Germany beats Turkey for right to host Euro 2024

first_img0Shares0000German Football Association (DFB) president Reinhard Grindel (L) is congratulated by UEFA president Aleksander Ceferin after it was announced that Germany will host Euro 2024 © AFP / Fabrice COFFRININYON, Switzerland, Sep 27 – Germany on Thursday won the race to host the 2024 European Championship as UEFA backed a bid seen as safer than the rival Turkish proposal.UEFA President Aleksander Ceferin announced the winner following a campaign that saw politics and concerns over human rights in Turkey play a central role. “I’d like to thank the UEFA Executive for their incredible confidence and I feel the responsibility — we will do our utmost to live up to expectations,” said German Football Association (DFB) president Reinhard Grindel after the announcement.“We want to put on a huge football festival and show the world how hospitable we are,” said ex-Germany captain Philipp Lahm, who will head the organising committee.UEFA considered that the German bid already had everything in place to host a successful event — from stadiums to infrastructure and hotels.European football’s governing body has also said it wants to make as much money as possible from the 2024 tournament and Germany was considered the better financial bet.The win also offers a boost to German football after a disastrous 2018 World Cup, when the country failed to qualify for the last 16 — after winning the tournament in 2014.German foreign minister Heiko Maas said the 2024 tournament “will be an opportunity to show what we stand for in Germany: openness to the world and tolerance, freedom and respect.“Together, we have to make the European Championship a tournament for all Europeans,” he added in a statement.Turkey meanwhile had been desperate to host its first ever major sporting event but its bid was weakened by concerns over its faltering economy, lacking transport network and, perhaps most importantly, human rights.Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan loomed large over the campaign and Thursday’s defeat may be seen in part as a personal rebuke.His government’s unprecedented crackdown, including thousands of arrests, following a failed 2016 coup has raised worldwide concern.That unease was shared by UEFA, which noted in its evaluation report that the Turkish bid’s “lack of action plan in the area of human rights is a matter of concern.”0Shares0000(Visited 1 times, 1 visits today)last_img read more

Monkey Raspberries Created Speech

first_imgWhat was this evolutionist thinking when he proposed that human language evolved out of the lip smacking and buzzing sounds made by monkeys?W. Tecumseh Fitch didn’t get any ridicule at all on Science Daily for proposing that “Monkey Lip Smacks Provide New Insights Into the Evolution of Human Speech.”  Nor did he from PhysOrg, which dutifully reprinted the press release from University of Vienna that stated, “Intriguingly, chimpanzees also make communicative sounds with their lips, including both loud lip smacks and lip buzzes (‘raspberries‘).”  The monkey on Fitch’s shoulder in the accompanying photo appears to be knocking on his master’s head, wondering, “Anybody home?”Fitch’s theory is not a hoot, the press release assures us.  “Scientists have traditionally sought the evolutionary origins of human speech in primate vocalizations, such as monkey coos or chimpanzee hoots,” the article stated without describing whose tradition deserved respect.  “But unlike these primate calls, human speech is produced using rapid, controlled movements of the tongue, lips and jaw.”  Fitch did his grunt work using cineradiography to analyze the lip-smacking behavior of macaques.  He found that the lips move faster than they do when monkeys howl.  He did not explain, though, how non-vocal lip movements could be a precursor of language, since monkeys are still smacking and buzzing raspberries without having evolved more advanced oratory, despite having millions of years more time to evolve than their upright primate brethren presumably had.  Didn’t they at least evolve envy?In his paper published by Current Biology (31 May 2012, doi:10.1016/j.cub.2012.04.055) with three colleagues, Fitch recognized his hunch has some missing links:Yet, there are striking differences between the two modes of expression, the most obvious of which is that lip-smacking lacks a vocal component (though a quiet consonant-like bilabial plosive or /p/ sound is produced when the lips smack together). Thus, the capacity to produce vocalizations during rhythmic vocal tract movements seen in speech seems to be a human adaptation. How can lip-smacking be related to speech if there is no vocal component? … Our data only address the evolution of vocal tract movements (the filter component) involved in speech production.It also cannot be tested:Because most traits involved in speech—the vocal production apparatus and the brain—do not fossilize, we are left with only the comparative method for investigating the evolution of speech. By comparing the behavior and biology of extant primates with humans, we can deduce the behavioral capacities of extinct common ancestors.The press release agreed, ending, “the origin of the ‘singing’ component of speech, which requires voluntary control over the larynx, remains mysterious.”  Much more mysterious, yet unstated, would be how to evolve Shakespeare from lip-smacking.Update 6/7/2012: Nature reported on Fitch’s hypothesis, giving it no raspberries but a serving of whipped cream.Fitch did not do his job as a scientist.  He should have considered all the alternative hypotheses.  As usual, he ruled out intelligent design or creation from the get-go, but there are other evolutionary theories he could have tested without abandoning the Cult of the Bearded Buddha that requires all observations to be fit into the Grand Myth.He could have, for instance, tested the Raspberry Theory of Language that proposes language evolved from the other end of the digestive tract, another body part that produces buzzing sounds.  Over millions of years, it is just as imaginable that an unguided process would give monkeys voluntary control over the pitch, duration and modulation of emitted signals, independent of the larynx.  Another theory is the Hand-Under-the-Armpit Theory of Language.  This proposes that meaningful signals (also independently of the larynx) made by pumping the arm over the hand inserted into the armpit evolved into middle-school boys communicating with one another.Perhaps it’s good Fitch didn’t consider these alternatives.  We wouldn’t want to find his cineradiography going viral on YouTube.Fitch’s shallow reasoning is evident in that he completely ignored meaning (semantics).  Meaning is orthogonal to signal.  It’s conceivable that certain ordered lip-smacks or raspberries could be controlled to communicate S.O.S.  The meaning of S.O.S., however, has nothing to do with the signalling method.  The message could be communicated with flashlights, telegraph, knots on a rope, skywriting, eye blinks or any number of methods.  Suggesting that lip smacking led to language is like saying that flashlights created Morse Code.Fitch’s hypothesis is also self-refuting.  The language he employed in his paper, if considered seriously, has its roots in unguided processes of lip-smacking and the production of buzzing sounds by his ancestors’ lips.  His readers are justified, therefore, by responding in kind.Save this latest evolutionary tale for the day of Darwinism’s spectacular collapse, when intelligent people will hoot and holler at the credulity of Darwinists.  They may well communicate their disdain independent of the larynx, by rolling their eyes and circling their index fingers around their ear, unquestionably employing intelligent design to convey the purpose of their bodily signals. 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FIR against Kabir Kala Manch for provocative speeches

first_imgThe Pune Police have booked six members of the Kabir Kala Manch (KKM), a predominantly Dalit and working class troupe performing protest music, for allegedly making provocative speeches at the Elgaar Parishad held in Pune on December 31 to commemorate the Bhima-Koregaon battle.The police had earlier filed an FIR against Gujarat MLA Jignesh Mevani and student leader Umar Khalid.The FIR was lodged against KKM activists Sudhir Dhavale, Deepak Dhengle, Jyoti Jagtap, Deepak Sagar Gorkhe, Harshali Potdar and Ramesh Gaychor at the Vishrambaug police station under Sections 153 (a), 505 1 (b), 117 and 34 of the Indian Penal Code on Monday night, the police said. Complainant Tushar Ramesh Damgude (37) said in his complaint, “Throughout their presentation, which included songs, speeches and drama, the KKM members made remarks designed to incite trouble, such as repeatedly calling for the crushing of the ‘neo-Peshwai’ mentality … It is my view that [the KKM] is a front for the CPI (Maoist) and is misleading the Dalit community with their seditious acts.”In January last year, the Supreme Court had granted bail to KKM activists Sachin Mali, Sagar Gorkhe and Ramesh Ghaichor, who had been arrested by the Maharashtra ATS for purveying ‘objectionable’ literature and aiding and abetting Naxal activities.Santosh Shinde of the Sambhaji Brigade, which participated in the Elgar Parishad, said the administration is hounding people who had taken permission for the Parishad instead of investigating Sambhaji Bhide and Milind Ekbote, against whom an FIR was filed after violence in Bhima-Koregaon on January 1.Meanwhile, the Pune Rural Police have arrested 27 people from the Maratha and Dalit communities for the January 1 clashes at Bhima-Koregaon. Nine of them have been sent to police custody till January 11.last_img read more

Why are the Gujjars agitated?

first_imgWhat are the grounds for this?The nine-day-long renewed agitation of Gujjars in Rajasthan earlier this month, seeking 5% reservation in government jobs and educational institutions, has again shifted focus on the community’s demand which has generated considerable political heat and disrupted public life several times since 2007. As many as 72 Gujjars have so far died in police firing during the quota agitation. Gujjars, who had initially demanded the Scheduled Tribe status in Rajasthan, point out that their main occupation is agriculture and animal husbandry and they have been left behind in educational and economic progress because they did not have the clout enjoyed by other influential communities. The caste structure among Hindus excluded them from the fruits of development, as they lived mostly in the remote areas of eastern Rajasthan districts. Though they were included in the Other Backward Class (OBC) list in 1994, the dominant Jat community has taken away the lion’s share of the quota.What is the status of quotas?At present, Rajasthan gives 21% reservation to OBCs, which covers 90 castes of both Hindu and Muslim communities. The Scheduled Castes get 16% reservation and the Scheduled Tribes 12%. This brings the total reservation to 49%, which is 1% less than the 50% ceiling mandated by the Supreme Court in the Indra Sawhney judgment. Gujjars, along with nomadic communities Banjara, Gadia-Lohar, Raika and Gadariya, were given 1% quota in the “most-backward” category, in addition to the OBC benefit, in 2010. The State government has tried thrice in the past to give 5% reservation to Gujjars as a ‘Special Backward Class,’ but the legislation was struck down every time by the Rajasthan High Court, which ruled that the quota had not only exceeded the 50% limit, but was also not supported by quantifiable data.What is the govt. stand?The newly elected Congress government passed a Bill in the Assembly during the Budget session on February 13, giving 5% reservation to Gujjars and four other nomadic communities as an ‘Extremely Backward Class’ and made a “recommendation” to the Centre that the legislation be included in the Ninth Schedule of the Constitution to protect it from being challenged in courts. This has resulted in the quota exceeding the 50% limit. The Bill, which amended an Act of 2017, made a mention of the Constitution Amendment Bill passed by the Union government to extend quota to the poor, which breached the 50% ceiling. The 10% reservation for the poor in the general category introduced by the Centre has also been implemented in Rajasthan, taking the total quota to 64%.Are Gujjars satisfied now? Gujjar Aarakshan Sangharh Samiti convener Kirori Singh Bainsla, who along with his supporters occupied the Delhi-Mumbai rail tracks in Sawai Madhopur district for nine days, lifted the blockade after the government gave a written assurance of legal steps to safeguard the quota. Col. Bainsla (retired) says Chief Minister Ashok Gehlot has promised the Gujjars that he will intervene if an issue arises later.What is in store? Though Gujjars have been granted the Extremely Backward Class status for the time being, the community expects the State government to effectively implement the special Deonarain scheme for their welfare, fill backlog of vacancies and consider withdrawal of criminal cases registered during the earlier agitations. The fate of reservation will depend on the courts taking a view on the new statute in the light of interpretation of the ceiling under exceptional circumstances.last_img read more

Canada Honoured to be Guest Country at MICA 2018 a Film and

first_imgAdvertisement OTTAWA, May 28, 2018 – In November 2017, during her bilateral trade mission to Mexico, the Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian Heritage, met her counterpart, Secretary of Culture María Cristina García Cepeda, to further strengthen the bilateral relationship and bolster Canadian culture’s contribution to economic and social prosperity. LEAVE A REPLY Cancel replyLog in to leave a comment Advertisement This special role at this year’s MICA will also give Canada a unique opportunity to showcase the benefits of coproducing with Canada to Latin American producers. This will be done through a series of networking events, including business-to-business meetings, and additional opportunities for two-way collaboration and trade.The event will also provide access to international business opportunities and commercial exchange worldwide between directors, producers, screenwriters and all professionals of the film industry.Quotes“The Government of Canada is helping Canada’s creative industries succeed abroad, which we know creates jobs and prosperity in every region of Canada. By creating new trade opportunities for the film, television and augmented reality/virtual reality sectors, we are setting the stage for Canadian creators and cultural entrepreneurs to take advantage of export opportunities to create growth that benefits people in both Canada and Mexico.”—The Honourable Mélanie Joly, Minister of Canadian HeritageQuick FactsCanada and Mexico are among each other’s largest two-way trading partners, and bilateral trade between the two countries—valued at over $40 billion in 2016—continues to grow annually.Mexico is the top exporter of creative goods in Latin America, exporting $5.4 billion in 2015. It is considered the geographic and language hub for the Latin American market as a whole.Canada and Mexico share a dynamic and prosperous relationship: as friends, as North American neighbours, and as strategic partners in the Americas and in the world. Over the years, our cooperation has expanded across a wide range of political, trade, social, environmental and security interests.The Canada–Mexico Partnership (“CMP”) is a key mechanism for bilateral cooperation. It serves as a catalyst for concerted action between governments, private sectors, and non-governmental partners to pursue common goals and mutually beneficial priorities.Related ProductsMinister Joly Champions Canada’s Creative Industries in MexicoAssociated LinksThe Canada–Mexico PartnershipMercado, Industria, Cine y AudivisualCanada–Mexico RelationsMICA Appoints Canada as First Guest of Honour Advertisementcenter_img Twitter Facebook As a direct result of these productive meetings and continued discussions under the Canada–Mexico Partnership (CMP), Minister Joly is delighted to accept the invitation extended from the Mexican Institute of Cinematography (IMCINE) and Secretary Cepeda to welcome Canada as the Guest Country of the third edition of Mercado, Industria, Cine y Audiovisual (MICA), a trade show taking place in Mexico City in June.Canada’s participation at MICA will reaffirm and enhance government-to-government relationships with Mexico, promote Canada as an important creative industries partner, and raise the profile of cultural trade between both countries. Canada’s presence at this event is guided by the Creative Export Strategy (CES), announced last September as part of Creative Canada, the Government of Canada’s vision for its creative industries. It aims to open and expand markets and opportunities for Canada’s creative entrepreneurs, helping them deliver their content to international audiences. Login/Register With:last_img read more

The One That Got Away Comes Back to Haunt the Canadiens

As I wrote Monday, over the past decade or so, the Montreal Canadiens and New York Rangers — who are playing in the NHL’s Eastern Conference finals — transformed themselves from a down-on-their-luck former champions to legitimate Stanley Cup contenders; both did this largely through shrewd drafting. One of Montreal’s most successful draft picks put on a fine show in Game 2 on Monday night, notching a goal and an assist.Unfortunately for Montreal, that player was defenseman Ryan McDonagh, and he was wearing a Rangers uniform in the Rangers’ 3-1 win (New York leads the series 2-0).In response to my article, a few FiveThirtyEight readers astutely pointed out that McDonagh ties together the parallel rebuilding stories of the Rangers and Canadiens. He was drafted 12th overall by the Canadiens in 2007, the top prize in a banner haul for Montreal that also included Max Pacioretty and P.K. Subban. Pacioretty and Subban, along with 2005 first-rounder Carey Price, are currently three of the Canadiens’ best players (according to the modified version of point shares I described Monday).In his four-year NHL career, McDonagh has produced 28.1 modified point shares, a number in line with Subban (34.6) and Pacioretty (23.4) at similar points in their careers.The fact that he hasn’t produced any of that value for the Canadiens, though, traces back to a major blunder in the summer of 2009, when Montreal traded McDonagh (as part of a package of several players) to the Rangers for center Scott Gomez.Two years prior, New York had signed Gomez to a rather ill-advised seven-year, $51.5 million contract, and the returns had been disappointing; his 14 modified point shares in 2007-08 and 2008-09 (combined) ranked 60th among NHL forwards over that span. Rangers general manager Glen Sather was anxious to rid himself of Gomez’s albatross deal, so the media’s contemporary view of the Gomez-to-Montreal trade was essentially that of a salary dump, billing the Rangers’ primary return as nondescript forward Chris Higgins. Some NHL insiders knew better, however: Yahoo’s excellent hockey blogger Greg Wyshynski wondered at the time how the Rangers managed to unload the Gomez millstone and pick up a promising prospect like McDonagh.As a Canadien, Gomez played decent hockey for one season (6.2 modified point shares), then rapidly declined. He went on a notable goalless streak of 370 consecutive days. His contract was bought out by Montreal during the 2011-12 season, and he’s bounced around as a journeyman the past few seasons. Meanwhile, McDonagh has blossomed in New York; only six other defensemen have produced more modified point shares over the past three seasons. McDonagh even became the subject of Norris Trophy talk late this season. On top of his offensive numbers, McDonagh often finds himself matching up against the opponent’s toughest forwards and is on the ice for a disproportionate number of face-offs in the Rangers’ zone, both marks of a defensive workhorse on the blue line.Without McDonagh, it’s unlikely the Rangers would be sitting where they are, with a 2-0 series lead on the cusp of a Stanley Cup Final berth. The Canadiens have their own pair of good defensemen in Subban and Andrei Markov, but they have to regret letting McDonagh slip away — especially on nights like Monday, when he made them pay for their mistake in a direct way. read more

The Football Hall Of Fame Has A Receiver Problem

Former Buffalo Bills wide receiver Andre Reed was inducted into the Pro Football Hall of Fame on Saturday, joining his longtime teammates Jim Kelly, Thurman Thomas and Bruce Smith in Canton. As a key contributor to the Bills’ four Super Bowl berths in the 1990s,1The lasting memory of Reed’s career for many NFL fans may be his performance in this game — eight catches, 136 yards and three touchdowns — when he helped Buffalo mount the biggest comeback in NFL history. Reed is a qualified candidate for the game’s greatest individual honor. But while he was good, he wasn’t nearly as good as several other receivers the Hall has ignored. It’s not Reed’s fault — it’s the Hall’s. Canton hasn’t figured out how to best judge the careers of modern wide receivers.Even in a sport where an individual player’s statistics are contaminated by the strengths and weaknesses of his teammates, his coaches and countless other considerations, wide receiver performance is a particularly tough nut to crack. Raw numbers rarely offer enough to help us properly distinguish between pass-catchers, especially across eras, and statisticians haven’t always agreed on how best to correct biases in the data.Take Reed’s career as an example. It’s a glossy one — at the time he retired, he ranked third all time in catches, fourth in receiving yards and sixth in touchdown receptions. But it’s also one that was entangled with the great ensemble of offensive talent, and one that was a beneficiary of the dawn of the NFL’s passing explosion. Moreover, some advanced stats show that Reed’s on-field influence wasn’t what it appeared to be — the evidence is surprisingly mixed with regard to his actual effect on team passing efficiency.In recent years, the Hall of Fame’s selection committee has reacted to its wide-receiver dilemma either by ignoring the position or by disregarding advanced stats when the committee does deign to induct those who played it. (Until Reed and Cris Carter were tapped in the last two elections, the Hall had only taken seven receivers since 2000, a number that included the controversial selection of Lynn Swann.) But Reed and Carter’s inductions signal that the WR logjam has become too much to ignore — and the tide of qualified receivers is only going to keep surging.2Marvin Harrison, Randy Moss and Torry Holt are either on the ballot or coming soon. It’s time to re-evaluate how we judge Reed and his contemporaries statistically.Wide receivers are products of their eras. When the NFL opened up the passing game in 1978, enacting new rules to make pass-blocking easier and to eliminate downfield defensive contact with receivers, league-wide passing output spiked almost instantly. As a consequence, the numbers that once automatically signified greatness quickly became devalued. For example, using a simple ratio of league passing yards per game in one season compared to another,3If the average passing yards per game in 2013 was 1.4 times as many as in 1960, I would multiply a 1960 player’s stats by 1.4 to “convert” to the equivalent in 2013. Reed’s 1,312-yard campaign in 1989 would have been the equivalent of a mere 883 yards a dozen years prior. What was, at the time, the 22nd-highest single-season yardage total ever becomes the 324th.To appreciate a receiver’s true(r) talent isn’t just about adjusting to his era, though, it’s also about adjusting to his team. The degree to which a receiver’s team throws the ball relative to the league norm has an effect on his stats. It’s a point that sounds laughably obvious, but somehow isn’t often considered when judging pass-catchers: Teams that run more plays through the air give their receivers more opportunities to put up eye-popping numbers.For Reed, this wasn’t a major factor; his Buffalo Bills and Washington Redskins threw about 3.5 percent less often than other teams in the league over the course of his career, which would only be enough to take 35 yards away from a 1,000-yard season. But it does matter for someone like Calvin Johnson, whose Detroit Lions have chucked the ball downfield 12 percent more often than average in a league that already generates 10 percent more aerial yards per game than the historical norm. How we treat this adjustment can make a huge difference in how a receiver is perceived statistically.I tried to solve this issue last August by developing a metric called True Receiving Yards (TRY) with Chase Stuart of FootballPerspective.com. (You can download the raw career TRY data, along with some other metrics I introduce later in this piece, on GitHub.) TRY attempts to boil down a receiver’s production4Including catches, raw yardage and touchdowns. into a single (yardage-like) number that adjusts for differences in schedule lengths, league-wide passing environments and team passing volumes.We initially scaled a player’s TRY in lockstep with the frequency with which his team passed relative to the league average. That downgraded Johnson’s 2012 production by 23 percent, because, despite him breaking the all-time single-season record for receiving yards that year, Detroit also broke the all-time record for pass attempts in a season.But it wasn’t as simple as that. Teams that pass heavily tend to do so for a reason. Namely, because they have a skilled quarterback and/or receivers. And so when Chase and I looked into it further, it became apparent that a 5 percent increase in team passing frequency didn’t necessarily lead to a 5 percent increase in individual receiving output. Instead, we found that it was more like a 2.5 percent increase — for any given increase in team passing volume, a player only saw half that increase in production.Our difficulty in pinning down the real effect of something so simple underscores just how ambiguous receiving stats can be. Complicating matters, receivers — unlike players at just about any other position — are competing with their own teammates for touches during a game, in real time. That makes them more like basketball players, and we know that a guy like Carmelo Anthony, who uses a lot of his team’s possessions, appears to exert an influence that goes beyond his personal stats. Having a receiver who commands extra attention seems like an obvious benefit to a team — but it’s difficult to prove that’s true.Not that it’s stopped statisticians from trying. The most commonly cited advanced receiving statistics are generated by Football Outsiders, whose Defense-adjusted Value Over Average (DVOA) metric tracks a team’s passing success on plays where a given player was targeted by the quarterback as the intended receiver. Measuring performance on a per-opportunity basis is rooted in the traditions of baseball’s sabermetrics, where discrete events can easily be identified as opportunities for specific players. But football is much more fluid than baseball, so we run into a curious phenomenon: By getting an opportunity — even an unsuccessful one — a receiver could be demonstrating a positive in-game influence, if not simply by stretching the defense and opening up opportunities for teammates.Some of this phenomenon also is rooted in Bayes’ theorem. Since coaches and quarterbacks both have strong incentives to funnel targets to their most talented receivers, the very act of being targeted for a pass is evidence of a player’s quality as an offensive threat. Because of this, looking at per-target metrics like catch rate and DVOA may miss the bigger picture of a player’s full on-field value. Those metrics aren’t taking into account how a receiver is shaping the game even when he’s not directly involved in a successful play.And then there’s the matter of adjusting for the quality of a receiver’s teammates, and quantifying how much his conventional numbers truly lead to better team outcomes. A year ago, I took a very rudimentary step in that direction by computing With Or Without You (WOWY) scores for historical receivers. Essentially, WOWY measures whether all of the quarterbacks who played with a given receiver were more efficient5According to Adjusted Net Yards Per Attempt (ANY/A) versus the league average. over their collective careers6After adjusting for aging effects. with him or without him. This is, in some ways, a more pertinent question to ask about a receiver — forget individual yardage, is he associated with a more efficient passing offense? But that question isn’t perfect either: It requires using an entire team’s passing-efficiency data, which can be noisy from season to season.Regardless, most of the usual suspects come out looking good by WOWY. For instance, Randy Moss, whose statistical sway over his quarterbacks was legendary, boasts a +1.1 WOWY,7Meaning the average True Receiving Yard gained in Moss’s career came on a pass from a QB whose ANY/A was 1.1 higher with Moss than without him. which ranks second only to Rod Smith’s8Whose influence on John Elway’s numbers was also very notable. among players with 10,000 career True Receiving Yards. And Tim Brown (the long-time Oakland Raiders receiver whom the committee did not select despite better individual receiving statistics than Reed) also ranks among the top WOWY receivers ever at +0.7.Reed’s WOWY, however, comes out tied for second-worst among players with 10,000 lifetime TRY. Despite his impressive raw (and adjusted) receiving numbers, he wasn’t associated with better play from his quarterbacks when they were throwing to him. How much of this merits a serious indictment of Reed as a player isn’t completely clear, but the Hall of Fame isn’t even having that discussion using new metrics.(Brown’s resume, on the other hand, was more impressive by every standard that doesn’t involve the postseason. And while 71 percent of Reed’s career yardage came on passes from Hall of Famer Jim Kelly, Brown put up his superior numbers with an aging Rich Gannon, Jeff Hostetler, Jeff George, Jay Schroeder and Vince Evans at quarterback.)Certainly the challenge of interpreting receiving data, especially across different eras of the game’s history, presents a daunting task to those seeking to fairly analyze Hall of Fame candidates. But the solution to the Hall’s wide receiver logjam isn’t to ignore the data entirely. It’s to dream up inventive ways of answering the pertinent questions about a player’s qualifications. Advanced analytics attempt to answer fundamental questions about a player’s actual on-field influence. Last I checked, that’s what’s supposed to put a player in the Hall of Fame. read more

Womens soccer Ohio State picks up pair of victories over weekend

In the 52nd minute, OSU senior forward Nichelle Prince was fed a ball through Purdue’s defense to face off 1-on-1 with the goalkeeper, ultimately resulting in a score for the Olympian.  This upped the Buckeye’s lead to 3-0.  Two minutes later in the 54th, Prince’s shot again found the back of the net, making it a 4-0 lead.  Strong defense continued throughout the game, but ultimately could not be perfect, as Purdue senior midfielder Milaro Gianna snapped the shutout, scoring Purdue’s only goal of the day.OSU prevailed with a 4-1 victory in the end. The Buckeyes hit the road Thursday, first traveling to College Park, Maryland to face off against the 4-9-1 (1-5-0 Big Ten play) Terrapins.  OSU began with a powerful and quick attack, where senior forward Lindsay Agnew scored the first goal in the first minute to propel the Buckeyes to the lead.  Less than a minute later, junior midfielder Emma Firenze netted her first goal of the season, doubling the Buckeyes’ lead to 2-0. Quick goal-scoring was a common theme on the weekend, as the Buckeyes had a fiery start again versus the Boilermakers, with a goal in the eighth minute by Edwards.  This marked her third goal within the two weekend matches.  Near the end of the first half, senior midfielder Nicole Miyashiro assisted a goal by redshirt senior forward Morgan Wolcott to put the Buckeyes up 2-0. OSU’s shots doubled that of Purdue’s at the end of the first half, with 10 shots to five.   The Buckeyes improved to 9-4-2 on the season (3-2-2 Big Ten play), recording a total of eight goals in two games while maintaining strong defensive play, only conceding one goal.  OSU’s next game is against the Indiana Hoosiers at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at 7 p.m. Thursday. OSU senior defender Nicole Miyashiro battles a Northwestern defender for the ball on Oct. 1, 2016 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Credit: Aaron Tomich | Lantern reporterA week of practice that constantly emphasized finishing offensive attacks led to a frenzy of goal-scoring this weekend for the Ohio State women’s soccer team.   OSU entered the second half versus Maryland having nine shots against 5.  Agnew created multiple scoring opportunities, including two crosses connecting with junior forward Sammy Edwards, both resulting in goals.  This put the Buckeyes up 4-0 after 58 minutes.  The Buckeye defense held strong, closing the game with a shutout over Maryland, earning the team’s eighth win on the season. Sunday, OSU made its way to West Lafayette, Indiana, to play the 3-10-1 (1-6-0 Big Ten play) Purdue Boilermakers.   read more

OSU studentathletes prove blood is thicker than pool water

Ohio State synchronized swimmer Meghan Kinney didn’t think it was serious when she experienced pain in her knee. Doctors told her otherwise. “I had been training on national team in California for six months and I noticed this pain in my knee,” Kinney said. “I was expecting to hear maybe I needed surgery … instead they sat me down and told me they found a tumor.” Osteosarcoma, or cancer of the bone, was causing the knee pain that Kinney had believed to be nothing more than a tear in her meniscus. “I felt like my life was in jeopardy,” Kinney said. Kinney was diagnosed Oct. 5 and left the synchronized swimming team to recover from her chemotherapy treatments and the surgery to remove the tumor in her knee. “It was complete shock. It was one of those moments they always say, ‘You never thought this could happen to you,’ it was exactly like that,” Kinney said. “I just felt right away nothing else mattered.” Doctors removed the tumor from her knee, and followed up with full body scans to make sure there were no other tumors. They did not find any. After the removal, Kinney has no cancer in her body, but is going through extensive chemotherapy to make sure the cancer never comes back. “The only cancerous tumor they found was in my knee,” Kinney said. “I am getting eight more months of chemo to prevent anything in the future, because if it came about in the first place it could come back in a while.” When word got around to other OSU athletes, the rowing team took charge to help raise money for her. The effort became known as Team Meghan and has been a collective effort of multiple teams across campus to raise money for Kinney. “I think it’s just really cool to see the Buckeye family, especially in athletics, just coming together to support one of their fellow Buckeyes,” said Monica Finnigan, a senior synchronized swimmer. “Some people don’t even know Meghan. Nobody on the rowing team knew Meghan before they started this fundraiser.” Those involved in the effort, which has been going on for nearly two months, set the goal to raise $10,000. The money will be used to help Kinney with medical expenses throughout her fight with osteosarcoma. “I want to do this,” said freshman synchronized swimmer Julia Gaylard. “It’s not something that we just needed a few people to do this. I want to help her family and help her because she’s a Buckeye and one of us.” Team Meghan has raised nearly $4,500 for Kinney from selling wristbands, including $1,925 that was raised during the men’s hockey games on Feb. 18 and 19. The wristbands, which are teal and have “Support TeamMeghan.com” written on them, have no set price. Whatever the amount of the donation, the supporter receives a wristband in return. “We can talk about how Buckeyes are there for each other, but it’s happening. It’s so powerful to see. And the other teams have been huge in helping. It’s so meaningful,” said Katherine Greene, a junior synchronized swimmer. “It’s been so incredible to see that.” Kinney’s teammates said she has impacted the team and holds a place in their hearts, and helping to raise money and support her in her fight with cancer was something that they were more than happy to do. “Meghan is so dear to my heart, that I wouldn’t do this for just anybody. The fact that she is such a close friend, I feel very privileged to be able to help her,” Greene said. “I just feel so happy to do this for her. I really feel so blessed.” Other teams involved in Team Meghan, whether through donating money or volunteering time, are fencing, men’s swimming and diving, men’s hockey, men’s track, women’s volleyball and men’s golf. Kinney said she is grateful that so many people, most of whom did not know her before Team Meghan, are willing to help her. “It means the world to me,” Kinney said. “The rowing team started selling these bands, before I knew it the whole team was involved in this fundraising effort for me.” Kinney said the hardest part for her has been not having control in her own life because of the cancer. “I feel like something’s been taken away from me,” she said. Kinney has hopes to return to the pool when she recovers from the surgery, which also included a knee replacement, and her treatment. “Swimming, it’s my passion, it’s my second home, being in the water,” Kinney said. “As soon as I can I’ll be back in the water.” read more

Eriksen named Junior members Player of the Season at Spurs

first_imgChristian Eriksen has been awarded the One Hotspur Junior members’ Player of the Season award for his excellent displays over Tottenham’s campaignThe Danish midfielder was presented with the award by One Hotspur Junior member Luke Canning at the club’s final game of the season with Spurs’ winning a nine-goal thriller against Leicester City in what was their last home league match at Wembley, before they move to their new stadium.“What a season it has been at Wembley! Hope you all enjoyed the season as much as we did. And thank you for voting me Junior members club player of the year,” Eriksen wrote on Instagram.The former Ajax star has scored 10 goals and made 10 assists in his 37 Premier League appearances for Spurs this season.Jan Vertonghen was named the club’s Player of the Year, while Victor Wanyama won Goal of the Season for his thunderbolt in the 2-2 draw at Liverpool earlier this year.last_img read more