Former Minister to Release New Book on Liberia’s Mining Sector

first_imgLiberian Geologist and former Minister of Lands Mines and Energy, Dr. Eugene Shannon. Renowned Liberian Geologist Dr. Eugene Shannon has disclosed that his long awaited book about the mining sector in Liberia will be release early next month.Dr. Shannon who is also the former Minister of the Ministry of Mines and Energy explained that the new book gives a description of the role the extractive industry plays in the economic sector of most developing countries.The book, titled: “Safeguarding the Environment in Mining Development Projects”, also describes the activities of transnational corporations (TNCs) in the mining sector.“Safeguarding the Environment in Mining Development Projects” explores topics ranging from the impacts on the economy, employment generation and mitigation measures to address externalities as a result of improper effluent disposal.Dr. Shannon, who is also a professor of geology at the University of Liberia, holds a Bachelor’s Degree (BSc) in geology and chemistry from Western Michigan University, Kalamozoo, Michigan, USA and the University of Liberia.Dr. Shannon also holds a Master’s Degree (MSc) in geochemistry and Clay mineralogy from Michigan State University and a Ph.D. in petrology and Geochemistry from Syracuse University, New York, USA.The book written by Dr. Shannon makes significant recommendations to both the Government of Liberia and investors.“It is equally important that any investor wishing to explore and eventually exploit mineral resources in developing countries should provide a management plan to the state authorities for approval before mining operation commences,” the book states.As an advice to the government, the book indicates that; “The activities of Transnational Corporations (TNC) have made major impacts on the economies and employment generation of most third world countries through technology transfer and mining ventures.”“First, mandatory environmental codes should be set by government so as to control the behavior of TNCs. Second, funding agencies such as the World Bank and other leading institutions should link environmental considerations as a condition to the disbursement of funds to the recipient and, thirdly, the developing countries in cooperation with the appropriate UN agency should develop a regional resource data bank on the environment, conduct periodic reviews of environmental legislations and assist government with an analysis of land use planning.Dr. Shannon’s Safeguarding Mining book also pointed to the House of Legislature indicating that: “The impact assessment must comply with legislation, setting standards for mining as they affect the environment. Such legislation must be specific and must address all relevant environmental issues including solid and liquid wastes disposal etc. amongst others.The book details the Environmental Management Plan which consists of a set of measures to be taken during implementation and operations for both pre-mining and mining operations to eliminate, offset or reduce adverse environmental impacts to acceptable levels.Dr. Shannon’s book is believed to have touched the nerves of several environmental issues including, waste, Health, meteorological, climate, costal and marine resources, mitigations and Cradle-to Grave Management Plan amongst others.Meanwhile, the book is expected to be sold for twenty three United States dollars and can also be purchased online at www.barnesandnoble.com, or www.amazon.com.Share this:Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window) – Advertisement –last_img read more

Plastic ban still high on EPA’s agenda

first_imgWith pollution taking its toll presently on the environment, resulting in more frequent flooding as a result of clogged drains and canals, the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) has reiterated the importance of having the ban on single-use plastics implemented sooner than later.In an interview with Guyana Times on World Environment Day, Executive Director of the agency, Dr Vincent Adams explained that the EPA has been in consultations with international agencies in this regard.“We’re still working on it in partnership with others too. Of course, you know we have been going to international meetings and conferences with the international communities under the United Nations etcetera but we are putting together a programme and a plan for it and again, all of that is going to be built into our entire strategic plan for the agency in terms of work,” he explained.According to him, the ban on single-use plastics is critical at this point as is a second look at what mercury is doing for the environment.He intends to have a microscopic view of what the effects of these and other contaminants are.When asked how soon can the ban implemented, the Director said he chooses to be “realistic”, saying “in a few years”.Adams reminded that consultations must be held with Guyanese before such a step is taken. He stated that “There are commitments and I don’t wanna say next year. I would like for it to be as soon as maybe next couple of years or so but we’ve got to be realistic here too. It’s not as simple as saying ‘okay you’re going to ban it.’ What are you going to put in place after you ban it and how it’s going to impact business, so there are all kinds of complexities but of course we are doing everything possible to make it happen as soon as possible.”Last April, the then Minister of State, Joseph Harmon at a post-Cabinet press conference announced Government’s position on ending of the use of plastic bags across Guyana.He explained that plastic is a problem across the world and Guyana, for its part, was not exempted from the consequences of this pollution.“Cabinet agreed that the matter had to be addressed if we were truly committed to the tenets of our Green State Development Strategy… It was further agreed that the Government would adopt and institute measures to minimise the use of plastic and propose appropriate legislation to give effect to these measures,” he had explained.According to Harmon, a Cabinet memorandum was prepared by the Environmental Protection Agency in this regard.Providing a timeline, Harmon was optimistic that the ban could be pulled off by the year 2021.“The intention is not going to be immediate, but they are basically going to get people, over time, to wean themselves off of plastics. There are six supermarkets that have indicated willingness to work with the EPA that they start to reduce… the use of plastic bags.”The implementation of this initiative comes at a time when Guyana happens to be one of the countries in the Caribbean that is mostly affected by plastic pollutants.In Guyana, plastic articles, specifically plastic bags, have been the reason for clogged drains, trenches and canals and have oftentimes resulted in flooding over the years. As though a precursor to banning plastic, the Government took a decision to place a ban on styrofoam back in 2016, after much contention.last_img read more