SC shocked over Madhya Pradesh disbursing ₹6500 to rape victims

first_imgIs rape worth ₹6,500?The Supreme Court on Thursday asked the Madhya Pradesh government while questioning the state whether it was doing a “charity” by giving this meagre amount to the victims of sexual assaults.The apex court said it was shocking that Madhya Pradesh, which was among the states which had received maximum funds from the Centre under the Nirbhaya fund scheme, was disbursing ₹6,000-6,500 only to each rape victim.The Nirbhaya Fund scheme was announced by the Centre in 2013 after the sensational December 16, 2012 gang-rape and murder case in Delhi to support the initiatives of governments and the NGOs working for women’s safety.A bench comprising Justices Madan B. Lokur and Deepak Gupta, while perusing the affidavit filed by Madhya Pradesh, said, “According to you (Madhya Pradesh) and your affidavit, on an average, you are paying ₹6,000 to a rape victim. Are you doing a charity? How can you do so… You value a rape at ₹6,500?”“For Madhya Pradesh, the figures are fantastic. There are 1,951 rape victims in Madhya Pradesh and you are giving them ₹6,000-₹6,500 each. Is that good, commendable? What is this,” the bench asked, adding, “this is total insensitiveness”.The bench termed it “shocking” that despite getting the maximum amount under the Nirbhaya Fund, the state had only spent around ₹1 crore on 1,951 rape victims.The Haryana government also faced the wrath of the top court today for not filing its affidavit giving details about Nirbhaya Fund.The court had last month directed all states and union territories (UTs) to file an affidavit indicating the amount received by them under the Nirbhaya Fund towards victim compensation, amount disbursed by them under the scheme and the number of victims of sexual assault. As many as 24 states and UTs are yet to file their affidavits.During the hearing, when Haryana’s counsel said they would file their affidavit, the bench observed, “If you have not filed affidavit, it is a very clear indication of what you feel for safety of women in your state”.“You take your time and tell the women in your state that you do not care for them,” the bench said while observing that 24 states and UTs have not yet filed their affidavit as per the court’s direction.When the counsel representing one of the petitioners told the bench that they have so far received only one affidavit filed on behalf of Sikkim, the bench asked, “Is this becoming a joke? If you are not interested in this case, tell us. On what basis you are saying that only one state has filed affidavit. You do not even see the office report?”The counsel for Meghalaya told the bench that they have disbursed around ₹30.55 lakh to 48 victims of sexual assault.In its order, the bench noted that despite all talks, discussions and intent expressed on gender justice, 24 states and UTs have not yet filed their affidavits.It asked these states and UTs to file their affidavits within four weeks, “if at all they were interested” in the welfare of women.Earlier, the Centre had told the apex court that it was finding it difficult to get the cooperation of states on the issue relating to disbursal of compensation to the victims of sexual assault under the Nirbhaya scheme.Six petitions were filed in the Supreme Court after the gangrape case in Delhi on December 16, 2012 raising concerns over the safety and security of women.All the petitions were tagged by the apex court and several directions have been issued from time to time in this regard.last_img read more

22 days ago​Liverpool loanee Wilson settling in well at Bournemouth

first_img​Liverpool loanee Wilson settling in well at Bournemouthby Ansser Sadiq22 days agoSend to a friendShare the loveLiverpool loanee Harry Wilson has no problems settling into life at Bournemouth on loan.The talented winger has been an impressive edition to Eddie Howe’s squad, adding three Premier League goals to his name in six appearances this season.He believes everyone at the club has helped to make him feel welcome, which has aided his acclimatisation.”I feel I have settled in well. The club have been great with that,” he told reporters.”The coaching staff and the players have really helped.”When I first moved here, I was in the hotel and that was near the beach, so I had a good few walks down there which was good.”I’ve got to know the area, so I am enjoying it.” About the authorAnsser SadiqShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

Can someone tell me what a PBM does

first_imgRepresentatives from Cigna, CVS Caremark, UnitedHealthcare’s OptumRx, Humana and Prime Therapeutics, all PBMs, testified on the ins and outs of their little-understood industry, disputing the idea that they are simply “middlemen” taking their cut, but rather pharmacy experts looking for the most effective and cheapest drugs for their clients.Though they’ve been around for decades, the new attention on PBMs had senators playing catch-up, trying to sort out and demystify exactly what they are and what they do.”Despite this vast influence over what often amounts to life and death, many consumers have very little insight into the workings of PBMs,” Sen. Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), chairman of the Finance Committee, said in his opening statement.Sen. Ron Wyden (D-Ore.), the panel’s ranking member, called PBM negotiations “the most gnarled, confounding riddles,” before giving the packed committee room a lesson in “PBM 101.””What PBMs do to earn all those profits is a mystery,” Wyden said.Sen. John Cornyn (R-Texas) used his time to ask a series of five yes-or-no questions to the all-male panel.Related StoriesAMSBIO offers new, best-in-class CAR-T cell range for research and immunotherapySurvey: Slow adoption of new technology is impacting pharmacy servicesArtificial DNA can help release active ingredients from drugs in sequence”I’m trying to understand the basic features of the contracts between manufacturers and PBMs,” he said. “I need to establish basic facts about how it works.”Senators pressed the witnesses for answers about their relationships to manufacturers. Did PBMs ever persuade drug companies to set a higher list price so the PBM could have more flexibility to negotiate a rebate? They all answered no.Some lines of questioning were less fruitful than others.”Are there any other egregious anti-consumer practices in your industry you’d like to highlight?” Sen. Debbie Stabenow (D-Mich.) asked.The complete silence suggested there were not.Sen. Sherrod Brown (D-Ohio) brought up the Trump administration’s proposal to eliminate drug rebates as a means of negotiation. He also used his question as an opportunity to call attention to Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar’s past job as an Eli Lilly executive and to hint at how drug companies also were part of the problem.”So to recap, PBMs do not set drug prices,” Brown said. “The administration rule will not change that fact.” Then Brown got to the point that numerous surveys have shown is a primary health care concern among Americans: high drug prices. “Most importantly, absolutely nothing in the proposed rule would require Secretary Azar’s former employer or any other pharma company to lower their price for insulin or any other drug,” he said.”We should be focused on solutions that would lead to lower drug prices, like my legislation to allow Medicare to negotiate on behalf of all Part D drugs and to prohibit price gouging,” Brown added.The witnesses said the key to lowering drug prices was not increased public transparency around the process or having the government negotiate drug prices. Instead, they advocated more competition in the drug market, something that would affect their favorite foe — drug manufacturers — the most.”It sure looks to me like you all are taking deliberate actions to pad your bottom line at the expense of patients,” Grassley said. Reviewed by James Ives, M.Psych. (Editor)Apr 10 2019It was back-to-school day at the Senate Finance Committee hearing Tuesday morning. In the third of a series of hearings on rising drug prices, the senators seemed focused on getting an answer to one central question: What the heck is a pharmacy benefit manager?Pharmacy benefit managers, or PBMs, are the go-between companies that negotiate with drugmakers on which medicines will make insurance plans’ lists of covered drugs and how much insurers’ plans will pay for them. This amount often involves rebates paid by the drugmaker to the PBM, and those savings are generally not passed on to the customer at the pharmacy counter. But when a consumer uses his or her health coverage to fill a prescription, PBMs are involved in paying the claim and setting the amount the consumers owes.PBMs and drug manufacturers are prominent players in the drug-pricing pipeline and each group has been trying to blame the other for soaring prices. PBMs increasingly seem to be in the hot seat — specifically targeted in a public relations campaign by the Pharmaceutical Research and Manufacturers of America, the powerful and influential trade association of the drug industry.The hearing attracted so many people that some spectators were turned away. Well over a dozen reporters were on hand to cover the proceedings. This article was reprinted from khn.org with permission from the Henry J. Kaiser Family Foundation. Kaiser Health News, an editorially independent news service, is a program of the Kaiser Family Foundation, a nonpartisan health care policy research organization unaffiliated with Kaiser Permanente.last_img read more

New scam aims to trick you into giving up your cell phone

first_img Citation: New scam aims to trick you into giving up your cell phone account information (2019, April 3) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-04-scam-aims-cell-account.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Verizon cuts 10,000 workers through buyouts as part of restructuring (c)2019 USA TodayDistributed by Tribune Content Agency, LLC. Explore further If someone calls you pretending to be from your cell phone carrier and asks for a verification code, don’t give it to them. That was a lesson learned in Florida last month after two different scammers tried to buy phones at a Clearwater, Florida, Verizon store.The two scammers, Ah’jhzae Diamondric Artag Berry and Keith Ramsey, had apparently tricked two unsuspecting victims in an attempt to purchase new devices on the victims’ accounts.Both scammers were busted at the store after Verizon alerted local police to the irregularity. Clearwater police department tells USA TODAY that the victims were unrelated, however, the department is not sure if there is a link between the two cases.Ramsey was trying to buy two iPhone XS Max phones valued at $1,200 per device on March 26. Berry was trying to purchase a single phone that was valued at $1,250 or March 21, police told USA Today.Tim Downes, detective sergeant for the department’s economic crimes unit, says Ramsey’s scheme started with getting the victim’s email address and sending his target a false message impersonating Verizon saying that there was fraud on the account with a number to contact. “That’s a bad number, so basically if you respond to that email you are going to get the bad guy,” Downes says.If you call back, the fraudster says they will send you a personal identification number, or PIN code, that they will want you to tell them. By giving them the PIN over the phone the scammer exploits the password reset verification system that Verizon has put in place to confirm that you are you.Once they have that PIN, they can reset the password, make themselves a “master account user” on your account and otherwise do what they want, including forwarding calls or going into a store and buying devices as that primary user.They’d have to pay taxes and some fees in the store on a new device purchase but could otherwise leave you footing the majority of the bill while they sell the device for a profit.Luckily, in this case, the Verizon store noticed how quickly the account changed and notified the police allowing both suspects to be apprehended while they were in the store.”We recognize that the privacy and security of information is of paramount importance to our customers. Unfortunately, it’s a harsh reality that bad actors are always looking for ways to engage in fraud and identity theft,” Verizon spokesperson Steve Van Dinter said in a statement provided to USA TODAY.”As fraudsters gather more private information from the dark web and create more authentic looking fake identification, our teams at Verizon are always working to stop these criminals who impact about 7,000 customers every month.”If you suspect fraud, Verizon recommends contacting them directly at (800) 922-0204.While cell phone fraud has been going on for years, Downes says that this method, exploiting the security measures against the victim, is new.So how can you protect yourself? He recommends checking the companies you deal with and being aware of the ways they interact with you. Verizon, for example, would never ask for those identification PINs they text you to confirm your identity.When in doubt, you can and should reach out to the company directly instead of responding to “them” reaching out to you.”People are getting smarter and more sophisticated, and it’s going to be more difficult to prevent these things from happening,” in the future, Downes says.”Be careful with these emails that you get, and people should be monitoring all their accounts and their credit report just to make sure everything is the way it should be,” he adds.”That goes a long way in helping to stop and prevent these frauds from happening.”last_img read more

Red Cross website hacked in latest Singapore cyber attack

first_img Explore further Citation: Red Cross website hacked in latest Singapore cyber attack (2019, May 16) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-red-website-hacked-latest-singapore.html © 2019 AFP Singapore says American leaked 14,200 HIV records This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only. Singapore, one of the world’s most digitally advanced countries, has been the target of multiple high-profile hacks in recent times, including the theft last year of 1.5 million citizens’ health records.In the latest attack, Singapore Red Cross (SRC) said personal details, including names, blood types, and contact numbers of 4,297 potential blood donors were compromised after an unauthorised access to a section of its website on May 8.SRC reported the breach to the authorities on the same day and police have launched an investigation, a statement said. “SRC takes this incident seriously,” the organisation said, adding that “external consultants” are helping in the probe.Preliminary findings showed that a “weak administrator password” may have made the site vulnerable.SRC Secretary General Benjamin William said the organisation was contacting individuals affected by the breach.Last July, the city-state’s biggest ever data breach saw hackers gain access to a government database and make off with the records of 1.5 million Singaporeans including Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong.An official inquiry highlighted a litany of failings, including weaknesses in computer systems, and inadequate staff training and resources. Authorities believe a state was likely behind that attack.Singapore in January announced that confidential information of 14,200 people diagnosed with the virus that causes AIDS had been dumped online, with most of those affected foreigners.Authorities accused Mikhy Farrera Brochez, an HIV-positive American who was jailed in the city-state and deported in 2018, of leaking the data after obtaining it from his Singaporean doctor partner.In March, the Health Sciences Authority said the personal data of 800,000 people who have donated or registered to donate blood in Singapore since 1986 were improperly put online for more than two months.Cybersecurity experts have pointed out that health data is particularly vulnerable because it can be used to blackmail people in positions of power. Scott Robertson, vice president of Asia Pacific and Japan for cybersecurity firm Zscaler, said the Red Cross breach “underscores that cybersecurity is a business problem that has to be supported by technology”. The Singapore Red Cross said Thursday its website had been hacked and the personal data of more than 4,000 potential blood donors compromised in the latest cyber attack on the city-state.last_img read more

ExFacebook exec recommends Zuckerberg step down as CEO

first_img Zuckerberg to explain how Facebook gets ‘privacy focused’ © 2019 The Associated Press. All rights reserved. Facebook’s former security chief is disagreeing with calls to break up the social network. Instead, Alex Stamos believes the way to fix problems is for Mark Zuckerberg to step aside as CEO.Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes and other critics contend that government regulators should require Facebook to spin off popular services such as Instagram and WhatsApp.But Stamos believes that just creates “three companies that have the same fundamental problems.”Facebook has been grappling with such problems as privacy, fake news and hate speech.Zuckerberg remains the company’s controlling shareholder, making it unlikely he will be replaced without his consent.Stamos left Facebook last year as the company dealt with fallout from bogus information spread on its social network. He spoke this week at a technology conference in Toronto. Explore furthercenter_img In this March 29, 2018 file photo, the logo for social media giant Facebook, appears on screens at the Nasdaq MarketSite, in New York’s Times Square. Facebook’s former security chief is disagreeing with calls to break up the social network. Instead, Alex Stamos believes the way to fix problems is for Mark Zuckerberg to step aside as CEO. Facebook co-founder Chris Hughes and other critics contend that government regulators should require Facebook to spin off other popular services such as Instagram and WhatsApp. (AP Photo/Richard Drew, File) Citation: Ex-Facebook exec recommends Zuckerberg step down as CEO (2019, May 24) retrieved 17 July 2019 from https://phys.org/news/2019-05-ex-facebook-exec-zuckerberg-ceo.html This document is subject to copyright. Apart from any fair dealing for the purpose of private study or research, no part may be reproduced without the written permission. The content is provided for information purposes only.last_img read more