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Age-old problems

first_imgThemix of cultures throughout the region, combined with the lack of technologicalinfrastructure make Africa and the Middle East difficult markets to enter, saysAlan HoskingBecauseemerging countries are generally lagging behind with regard to globalisationtrends and practices, most of them present their own unique set of HRchallenges. Generally accepted practices and thinking cannot be taken forgranted, and in order for companies to avoid serious financial loss or legalaction, it is important for them to familiarise themselves thoroughly withlocal legislation, customs and conditions in countries they propose entering.However,this has not hindered numerous multinationals such as Sweden’s Volvo or Korea’sHyundai from developing a presence in such regions. Two other multinationalsdominate their sectors on the African continent. McCann-Erickson has thelargest marketing communications network on the continent, with full serviceagencies in 23 African countries, where they are building over 30 internationalbrands such as Motorola and Coca Cola. The Ernst & Young Africa Group has anetwork of 27 offices covering 51 African countries, offering what they call an”on-the-ground” service. Their offices are staffed by 11,000professionals across the continent, over 400 of whom are based outside SouthAfrica.SouthAfrica is referred to as the economic powerhouse of Africa for good reason. Itsbusiness infrastructure is of a first-world standard, which has resulted inmost multinationals having a very strong presence in the country. South Africais, in many cases, used as an “African headquarters”. Since thedemise of apartheid legislation, more and more multinationals are appearing inthe South African market place. Ford has returned to the country after years ofabsence, and this trend continues.Labourlaws in developed countries are very different from those in Middle Eastern andAfrican countries. In the United Arab Emirates, no unions or strikes arepermitted, and foreign nationals risk deportation should they attempt to engagein any union activity or organise strikes. Workers are also forbidden by lawfrom collective bargaining. Saudi Arabian regulations also forbid unionactivities.Researchby international management consultants PricewaterhouseCoopers reveals that HRmanagers in the Middle East have been very slow to embrace new technology ande-business, and they have been reluctant to use modern IT and Internettechniques to improve operational efficiency.Inaddition, findings indicate that HR managers play a far less significant rolein their companies than their European counterparts, with administrativeactivities accounting for about 50% of their time. Local HR skills thereforetend to be more administrative than strategic and business-driven. However, thegap is narrowing.HRpeople in the Middle East are generally not regarded as having sufficientskills to fulfil the four key roles required in the region, namely that ofstrategic partner, administrative expert, employee champion and change agent.ADeloitte & Touche Middle East survey highlights employee retention as achallenge in Middle Eastern countries. The survey points out that to try andretain staff, HR managers have to take into account conditions in the externalmarket and in the workplace. It recommends that once a company has identifiedits most valuable people, proactive strategies should be put in place to retainthese resources. Other factors to emerge from the survey were shortages in thelabour market, which contributed to high turnover, uncertainties in theworkplace and organisational turmoil.Localcustoms can also affect the way businesses are able to operate. In Oman, forexample, non-Muslim workers are required to respect daytime fasting in themonth of Ramadan by not eating or drinking in public. Despite suchrequirements, however, Oman is considered very attractive to foreign workers asit has generally good living conditions.Africancountries present their own challenges for HR professionals. All have verydifferent labour laws and while some countries are attempting to becomeinvestor-friendly, others are making it more difficult for themselves toattract foreign investment due to restrictive labour and other laws, and badmismanagement at very senior levels.SouthAfrica has five legislative Acts that regulate employers. These are the BasicConditions of Employment Act, the Labour Relations Act, the Skills DevelopmentAct, the Skills Development Levies Act and the Employment Equity Act. Theyapply to all business activities operating in the country, whether foreign orlocal, and carry penalties for non-compliance.Onthe other hand, technological infrastructures in the business centres of SouthAfrica are generally world class, and HR has embraced the Internet as a meansof doing business, with some very active on-line recruitment firms such asCareerJunction and Jobfood gaining high prominence. More and more HR servicesare Web-based and HR practices are, in some cases, on a par with first-worldstandards and in certain specific disciplines quite possibly ahead.Immediatepast president of the Institute of People Management (IPM) in South Africa,Tiisetso Tsukudu, says there is an increasing pool of highly skilled people inAfrica who have received excellent training in the US, UK, Europe andelsewhere. They have brought their skills back with them on returning to theirhome countries and are now in top-paying jobs in the fields of telecoms,finance and mining, among others.Tsukudusays that ethics in business, on the other hand, is a huge challenge facing HRin Africa. In some countries, corruption has become so endemic that it isalmost an accepted way of doing business. In Nigeria, where years of lootinggovernment coffers has resulted in a lack of funds to pay workers, people inthe workplace are severely demoralised because they are owed salary arrears formany months. This general demotivation has permeated all levels of theworkplace, resulting in productivity problems.Anotherchallenge in the workplace in African countries concerns the impact of AIDS.Durban-based MD of Vizual Business Tools in South Africa, Dawid Swart, saysthat discussions with Malawian HR managers have revealed that a major portionof their working time is taken up arranging and attending the funerals ofemployees who have died of AIDS. Tsukudu agrees that HIV/AIDS is affectingpeople’s roles at work, pointing to a new phenomenon in the workplace known as”funeral fatigue”.AIDSis no longer affecting only the unskilled and the uninformed in central andnorthern Africa. Despite better education and training, many professionals inthese countries have also contracted HIV because of longstanding superstitionsand cultural beliefs. In South Africa, there is a high level of awareness ofthe impact of AIDS in the workplace and numerous consultancies with qualifiedmedical doctors provide specialised support for companies in the management ofAIDS among their workers. Risk managers and actuaries also provide financialplanning and projections to enable companies to plan strategically and minimisethe effect on the company.Diversitymanagement is also a challenge in Africa. With so many different cultures andcreeds, and with xenophobia being a very real problem in African countries, HRdirectors have to ensure that culture integration and the integration ofexpatriates is handled by experienced experts. A case in point is the workbeing done by UK-based Dr John Wenburg, president of Pecos River Aon Consultingfor British Airways in Africa. Wenburg says that BA has moved away from usingexpatriate managers to appointing managers from the country they are operatingin, and this has resulted in their having to deal with major diversity issues.Whileall people issues are complex, Middle Eastern and African countries presentadded complexities because of the dynamics that have been in existence therefor centuries. The challenge for HR therefore is not to attempt to eliminatethese complexities, but to manage them within certain parameters.Who’sgoing where?Africais fast-gaining interest from Western investors. For example:–Korea’s Huyundai and Sweden’s Volvo both operate from Botswana–Canadian-owned marine minerals corporation Afri-Can has a strong presence inNamibia–McCann-Erickson has agencies in 23 African countries–Ernst& Young Africa Group  has 27offices covering 51 African countriesFurtherinformationProbablythe most comprehensive Web site for business and other information on Africa isSouth Africa-based www.mbendi.co.za, which features a unique one-stopinformation, intelligence, research and advisory service called AfricanResource Network for companies and business people wanting to do business inAfrica. Otheruseful Web sites:PricewaterhouseCoopers:www.pwcglobal.comDeloitte& Touche: www.dttus.com Age-old problemsOn 1 Apr 2001 in Personnel Today Comments are closed. Previous Article Next Article Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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VIDEO: USS Abraham Lincoln Selected as Battle “E” Award Winner

first_img View post tag: Abraham VIDEO: USS Abraham Lincoln Selected as Battle “E” Award Winner View post tag: A/S View post tag: usa Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS Abraham Lincoln (CVN 72) was named the Naval Air Force Pacific Battle Efficiency (Battle “E”) award winner Feb. 11, in a close competition among the aircraft carriers in the Pacific Fleet. “The Sailors and officers of this carrier continue to achieve and surpass the high standards of those who have preceded them. We are proud of the operational excellence and sound fiscal execution that you have displayed. You have my personal congratulations on a job well done,” Commander, Naval Air Forces (CNAF) Pacific, Vice Adm. David H. Buss wrote in a congratulatory award message.The Battle “E” competition is an evaluation of the ship’s abilities in logistics, material, engineering, damage control, navigation and command and control, as well as air, surface and subsurface warfare. Lincoln earned an “E” in all of the departmental categories. Once the Lincoln passed these evaluations, it had to demonstrate sustained superior performance, operational effectiveness and documented combat readiness to CNAF. The yearlong evaluation also included inspections and observing training.Capt. Karl O. Thomas, Lincoln’s commanding officer, said the Battle “E” topped off a highly successful 2012 for the crew.“It took the entire ship-air wing team working together, and tremendous support from the families during an around the world cruise and home port change,” Thomas said. “They are richly deserving of this recognition, and I couldn’t be more proud of each and every one of them.”At the beginning of 2012, Lincoln was already underway in the 7th Fleet on the first leg of her around-the-world cruise, which would culminate in a change of home port to Norfolk, Va. The ship finished the year having sailed more than 58,600 nautical miles through the 5th, 6th and 7th Fleets, completing 8,100 arrested landings with no Class A or B mishaps, flying more than 30,000 hours, with more than 2,400 directly supporting troops on the ground in combat.In addition to its Battle “E” accomplishments, while deployed in support of Operations Enduring Freedom, Lincoln Sailors qualified all of its eligible Sailors as Enlisted Surface Warfare Specialist (ESWS), and 77 percent to Enlisted Aviation Warfare Specialist (EAWS). In concert with Carrier Air Wing 2, Lincoln launched 2,411 operational missions in support of Operation Enduring Freedom during its around-the-world deployment. The ship also exceeded the Navy-wide average for promotion rate to Petty Officer and Chief Petty Officer by 18 percent.The following video gives a brief insight into USS Abe Lincoln’s everyday operations.[mappress]Naval Today Staff, February 14, 2013; Image: US Navy View post tag: Naval February 14, 2013 View post tag: Navy Training & Education View post tag: winner Share this article View post tag: News by topic View post tag: award View post tag: Battle View post tag: SELECTED View post tag: € Back to overview,Home naval-today VIDEO: USS Abraham Lincoln Selected as Battle “E” Award Winner View post tag: Lincoln View post tag: USSlast_img read more

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Mephedrone: Oxford student drug use revealed

first_imgThe specialist also reported that, chemically, the substance is an amphetamine like controlled drugs such as Speed.“You’d say that it’s in the category of amphetamines,” he said.Students spoken to by Cherwell also had little idea about if or when the drug was due to be reclassified by the government, with most believing that a new legal status would be set at the end of this or next month.A rumour of an imminent change in the legal status prompted a spike in sales as users ‘stockpiled’ earlier in the year.But a Home Office spokesperson confirmed that the Advisory Council for the Misuse of Drugs (ACMD) to the government was not due to report their findings into Mephedrone until the spring. The government would then take time to reclassify the drug, meaning that it may remain widely available for the rest of the academic year.The spokesperson said that the Council were reviewing the drug as an urgent priority. A source within the ACMD confirmed that “[Mephedrone] is one of our most pressing concerns. We are also investigating use of anabolic steroid for cosmetic reasons.”And despite the drug’s currently uncontrolled status, Oxford University proctors have now said that any student found abusing the substance is liable to be disciplined. “It is an offence…for any member of the University to engage in action which is likely to cause injury or to impair safety. Even if a substance is legal, supplying it to others in the knowledge of documented adverse side-effects could fall under the above,” said a representative for the university.“We would strongly advise students against the practise [sic] of taking any substance that could cause potential risks to their health,” they said.All students spoken to as part of the investigation asked to remain anonymous.See Cherwell’s editorial on drug use in Oxford: http://www.cherwell.org/content/9586 Mephedrone, recently labelled in the national press as the “UK’s new favourite drug”, is widely taken by Oxford students who thave little idea of the associated side effects and health risks.A Cherwell investigation this week has shown that students at the University are not only use the drug recreationally, but also as a study aid.They investigation also found that student-users are ignorant of forthcoming changes in its legal status, with many students incorrectly believing the drug will be banned imminently.Mephedrone, also known as M-Kat, is widely available online. However, the compound is illegal to sell for human consumption, so the websites which sell it market the drug as a plant fertiliser. The substance costs around £10 for a gram, with discounts available for bulk orders, making mephedrone less than a quarter of the street price of cocaine.Students report the drug as causing a feeling of euphoria, increased self-confidence and conversational ability and, in some cases, sexual arousal. They also said that the drug helped them to stay awake and “lively” when going out.One leading Oxford pharmacologist, who asked to remain anonymous due to the sensitive nature of the issue, warned of the dangers of potential overdose on the drug.Many students use mephedrone because of its easy access and immediate effects. “It’s not as strong as cocaine or ecstasy,” said one undergraduate, “and it’s obviously much easier to get hold of. Iknow there must be risks about taking it, but not as much as others. It’s more of a sweetie-drug for me.”“It’s the smart person’s drug of choice, you take it, don’t drink, have a bit of a buzz, and then wake up feeling fine,” said another. “It’s legal which makes it seem a bit less bad, even though obviously it’s not legal for what we do with it…” The Home Office has confirmed to Cherwell that mephedrone is only legal when sold for purposes other than human consumption.One surprising finding of the survey was that a minority of students are taking the drug as a study aid, a use not reported on until now.“I had the idea for using it for an essay crisis because it kept me up all night at a club, and I didn’t feel bad in the morning,” said a student. “I only took only took a little bit in comparison to what I’d do on a night out, and it gave me a slight mood elevation – which you definitely don’t get from coffee.”“I’ve only done it once or twice as a last ditch resort,” he said, “‘because it’s quite a precarious solution”.Many emphasised the fact that the drug can be delivered to your door by post as an advantage. “You can buy it easily online – no lurking about on dark corners or cryptic text messages – you can buy it during labs!”“There’s something rather delicious about the postman handing over your fix by special delivery,” claimed one modern languages undergraduate.But one leading pharmacologist, who has led research into recreational drugs, told Cherwell that “with Mephedrone you’re taking an unknown dose, and one of the dangers with this is that someone will overdose.”When asked what he would tell students using the drug, he said, “don’t assume that just because it’s legal it’s safe”.He quoted a public health report which listed the possible negative side effects of use as “uncomfortable changes in body temperature (sweating and chills), heart palpitations, impaired short term memory, insomnia, tightened jaw muscles, grinding teeth, muscle twitching, dizziness, light headedness, vertigo,” as well as pain and swelling in the nose and throat if the substance is snorted.last_img read more

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Residents Call for Changes at Intersection Where Fatality Occurred

first_imgIn June, Dr. John Albert urged City Council to make safety improvements to the intersection where his stepson was fatality struck on May 25. By Donald WittkowskiThe stepfather of a vacationer who was struck and killed while crossing the street over the Memorial Day weekend made an impassioned plea Thursday night for Ocean City to overhaul what he called an unusually dangerous intersection.“In the military, we call it the ‘kill zone,”’ Dr. John Albert told City Council while describing the intersection of Eighth Street and Bay Avenue.Albert’s stepson, Thomas F. Gibbons Jr., died after being struck May 25 while crossing the intersection with his wife, Stephanie, who was also hit by the same motorist. Stephanie Gibbons was taken to a hospital but survived her injuries.Gibbons, 47, an engineer from Lansdale, Pa., is also survived by two teenage daughters. He was a frequent Ocean City vacationer and was visiting over the Memorial Day weekend.“In the warmer months, Ocean City, N.J., was always his favorite destination; whether it was the boardwalk, beach or bay, Tom loved it all,” his obituary said.In a press release, police said the vehicle was going west on Eighth Street and turned left on Bay Avenue when it hit Gibbons and his wife.The driver was not immediately identified. An investigation is being conducted by the Police Department’s Traffic Safety Unit, the department’s Detective Bureau and the Fatal Accident Investigation Unit of the Cape May County Prosecutor’s Office.Some residents believe the intersection of Eighth Street and Bay Avenue should be rebuilt to protect pedestrians and bicyclists from motor vehicle traffic.Choking back tears, Albert appealed to the Council members and Mayor Jay Gillian to reconstruct the intersection of Eighth and Bay to prevent other tragedies from happening. He was joined by other members of the audience who stood up to state that they had narrowly avoided being struck at the same intersection in close calls over the years. They, too, called for changes at the intersection.“It’s extremely dangerous,” said Gregg Wolfe, a 30-year resident of Ocean City who was nearly hit by a car while riding his bike last summer at Eighth and Bay.Albert described a series of measures he believes the city should take to reconfigure the intersection, including new turning lanes and a crosswalk that would be controlled by traffic signals.He said he and his wife were also nearly struck at the same intersection last year.“That intersection is dangerous, and I’m going to prove it tonight. It needs to be changed,” Albert said, while displaying a diagram he had of the streets.While speaking to the Council members, he repeatedly urged the city not to waste any time in rebuilding the intersection to make it safer.“I’m not looking for sympathy. I’m looking for action,” he said.Members of Council say the city will do whatever is possible to heighten safety at the intersection.The Council members commended Albert for his remarks about the intersection. They also said he showed a “tremendous amount of courage” while speaking about his late stepson. They pledged that the city will do whatever it can to improve safety at the intersection.“It certainly puts things in perspective,” Councilman Bob Barr said, echoing the sentiments of the other members.Afterward, Albert huddled with Mayor Gillian in the hallway outside the Council chambers. The mayor assured him that the city would examine the intersection, but also told him that Bay Avenue is a county road.Speaking later with reporters, Gillian said city officials plan to contact the county to immediately begin discussing possible changes to create a safer intersection.“We’re going to start tomorrow,” he said.While expressing his sympathy over Gibbons’ death, Gillian said the accident reflected “a bigger issue” in which motorists should be more careful while sharing the streets with pedestrians and bicyclists.As the two men spoke, Albert told Gillian, “When you drive around these streets, it’s the Wild West out there.”Dr. John Albert, left, confers with Mayor Jay Gillian in a hallway outside the Council chambers.Albert lives in Fort Myers Beach, Fla., but owns a vacation condominium in Ocean City at Eighth Street and West Avenue, only one block from where his stepson was fatally hit.In an interview with reporters, Albert said the intersection of Eighth and Bay is deceptively tranquil. He believes there are myriad distractions, including the surrounding homes, parked cars and the nearby Route 52 Causeway bridge, that make the intersection particularly dangerous.Shadows that occur in fading sunlight also obscure the view of the intersection and heighten the hazards for both motorists and pedestrians, he said.“It looks like a pastoral, little setting. Let me tell you, it’s a kill zone,” he said.last_img read more

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Waitrose Orange Christmas Puds sell for £1k

first_imgWaitrose is expecting a scramble in the aisles after sending more of its Hidden Orange Christmas Pudding out to stores.The Heston Blumenthal creation has proved such a monster hit that it quickly sold out and has since been fetching exorbitant prices on eBay. Enterpreneurial shoppers have posted dozens of the puddings on the site, with many selling for about £50 in the last two days, although two have fetched £1,000 and many others have sold for hundreds of pounds. On Thursday, there were 178 puddings on the internet sale site.“We’ve made as many as we can, but cannot produce any more because the candied orange takes weeks to candy,” said a Waitrose spokeswoman. The surprise Christmas hit retails at £13.99 each and contains a whole orange inside, which is revealed when the pudding is cut open. The chain has sold “tens of thousands”, according to the spokeswoman, who added: “A few hundred have been sent out to stores. We expect them to sell out straight away – they certainly won’t last until Christmas.”Enterprising home bakers are also offering a recipe for the orange puddings on eBay for 99p.last_img read more

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General Mills invests in pudding brand Pots & Co

first_imgSource: Pots & CoPots & Co founder Julian Dyer in the London factory with the range of potted puddingsPosh pudding brand Pots & Co is set to expand its US offering after receiving an investment by General Mills-owned 301 Inc of up to £15m.The venture capital arm of General Mills is leading a multistage investment in Pots & Co as part of a growth strategy to expand its product range and distribution in the US. The move marks General Mills’ first investment in a UK company, it said.London-based Pots & Co will initially supply its range of potted puddings to a select number of stores on the West Coast and Rocky Mountain region. Its recently launched savoury Mezze style dips will follow.The investment is supported by increased retail distribution in the US. It will also enable the business to explore manufacturing capabilities across the pond as well as invest further into marketing and distributing the brand, it said.“We want to create one of the world’s leading food brands and we are thrilled that General Mills has invested in Pots & Co, enabling us to speed up the growth of our business and creating fabulous products for the American consumer,” said Julian Dyer, founder of Pots & Co.“We continue to focus on exceptional quality and taste, using only the finest natural ingredients to deliver top quality puddings and savoury food to supermarket aisles in both the UK and the US.”All products distributed in the US are currently hand made in Pots & Co’s London-based factory.Its UK-line up comprises a vanilla creme brulee pudding and baked lemon cheesecake, as well as a hot chocolate & salted caramel lava cake and hot maple & pecan lava cake.The pudding brand, which was founded in 2013, has grown rapidly. In 2014, it achieved sales of £2m, which increased to £14m in 2020, a 700% increase over six years.“As our first overseas investment and first investment in a UK company, we believe Pots & Co will deliver substantial growth with an increasing range of puddings and with its move into savoury products. We’re excited to partner as the brand expands its presence in the US market,” added John Haugen, founder and managing director of 301 Inc.last_img read more

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Three win international Rhodes

first_imgA Harvard senior and two recent alumnae — one the sister of a 2004 winner — have been named international Rhodes Scholars, and will join the six American Harvard students who will head to the University of Oxford next fall.The award, one of the most prestigious in academia, each year recognizes 83 scholars for their scholastic achievement, personal integrity, leadership potential, and physical vigor. Created more than a century ago by the will of British philanthropist Cecil Rhodes, the scholarships cover all costs for two or three years of study at Oxford.‘The power of educational opportunities’For Naseemah Mohamed ’12, the award has personal and national historical resonance, a chance both to replicate the success of her sister Shazrene, a Harvard graduate and now an astrophysicist, and “to give back to my country” — Zimbabwe, part of the former Rhodesia — “and continent and ultimately combat the legacy of Cecil John Rhodes himself.” Rhodes helped to establish the African colony that bore his name.“Winning the Rhodes for me is a testimony of the power of educational opportunities,” said Mohamed, whose scholarship application addressed colonialism’s legacy on Africa’s schools.“I believe that the classroom is the crucible of a nation’s future, and that it should be a microcosm of co-operative social engagement,” Mohamed wrote in her essay. She said that after completing her studies toward a doctorate in education at Oxford, she intends to work with international institutions such as UNESCO “to create robust education systems in developing countries.”The co-founder of the Center for African Cultural Excellence while at Harvard (where her work was recognized by winning the Harvard College Women’s Leadership Award, the Harvard Foundation Insignia Award, and the Michael C. Rockefeller Traveling Fellowship), Mohamed served as the president of the Harvard African Students Association. She also founded the Zilolonge Arts–Literacy Project, which pairs teachers and artists to aid arts-based learning at an impoverished school in Zimbabwe. She is currently working with a district officer from the Ministry of Education to expand the project.Mohamed credited the inspiration of Professors Doris Sommer and Evelyn Higginbotham of Harvard’s African and African American Studies Social Engagement Program. “I could not have gotten this far alone,” she said. “I am grateful for their incredible dedication and support.”‘Think broadly’Dalumuzi Mhlanga ’13 will use the scholarship to study toward a master’s degree in social anthropology. The founder of Lead Us Today, a nonprofit that provides leadership and entrepreneurial training to high school students in his native Zimbabwe, Mhlanga said his research will focus on the country’s informal economy and knowledge production process.“I am interested in learning how people produce economic knowledge in the informal sector and what kind of knowledge they produce, with what effect,” said Mhlanga, who concentrates on social studies with a focus in civic engagement and democracy in Africa. “I hope to use this research to learn how best the education system can be transformed in ways that equip many of the young students who graduate from high school and engage in legal, informal economic activity.“More broadly, I hope my work can add to the discourse on how the informal economy can be leveraged to bring about economic development in the Global South (developing countries).”At Harvard, Mhlanga served as assistant director of the Leadership Institute and vice president of the Youth Alliance for Leadership and Development in Africa. He was also appointed student representative to the Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) Committee on Public Service.At Oxford, he said, “I most look forward to interacting with other Rhodes scholars studying in different disciplines and from all over the world. I look forward to learning from others and challenging each other to think broadly [across disciplines and using varied skill sets]  about the problems we hope to address.”‘Incredibly fortunate’Madeleine Ballard ’11 is from Quebec and is currently working with Tiyatien Health to deliver maternal and child health care in a remote district of Liberia. She plans to pursue a master’s degree in evidence-based social intervention.“I feel so incredibly fortunate to have been selected,” she said. “There is an awe-inspiring tradition of Rhodes scholars accomplishing great things that advance and enrich our world. To be counted among such leaders, moral exemplars, and thinkers is a great honor.”Ballard’s interest in public health was fostered at Harvard, where she volunteered for the Harvard College Global Health and AIDS Coalition and the Harvard College Peer Health Exchange. Studying at Oxford, she said, will allow her to “put the fruits of academic study, on-the-ground experience, and deeply held convictions at the service of those who need them most.”“I believe that health is a human right and that ‘the greatest wealth is health,’ ” she wrote in her Rhodes application. “My academic study and lived experience have only made my conviction to work in solidarity with underserved communities grow stronger.“Regions like the one I work in in Liberia are plagued not only by lack of services, but by the prevailing notion that their people are too inaccessible, too difficult, and too expensive to treat. Only by pioneering and validating new possibilities in community health delivery can paradigms be changed and a new standard of dignified, accessible health care achieved.”last_img read more

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24-Year-Old Dies From COVID-19 Complications In Cattaraugus County

first_imgShare:Click to share on Facebook (Opens in new window)Click to share on Twitter (Opens in new window)Click to email this to a friend (Opens in new window) CDC Stock Image.LITTLE VALLEY – A 24-year-old man has died from COVID-19 complications in Cattaraugus County.The Health Department says this is the 33rd death related to the virus.They say the man experienced a cardiac event and was unable to overcome his illness despite aggressive medical treatment.Additionally, the county reported 25 new cases of the virus on Saturday, with 580 active. There are 32 people hospitalized with the virus in the county.The seven-day average percent positivity rate is 8.2%, down from 8.9% on Friday.There are now 1,732 cases total, with 1,119 that have recovered.last_img read more

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MHI Vestas to install largest turbines to date at Scottish floating offshore wind farm

first_imgMHI Vestas to install largest turbines to date at Scottish floating offshore wind farm FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Offshore Wind Journal:Turbine OEM MHI Vestas has confirmed it will supply five V164-9.5 MW turbines for the Kincardine floating offshore windfarm in Scotland.The deal means the Kincardine windfarm will be the first floating project in the world to feature wind turbines over 9 MW.MHI Vestas chief executive Philippe Kavafyan said, “Bringing our technology and experience to Kincardine in Scotland confirms our long-term commitment to commercial-scale, floating offshore wind projects.”As floating offshore wind accelerates toward its full potential, MHI Vestas anticipates substantial learnings from Kincardine, enabling the turbine supplier to better understand installation and commissioning techniques, main component interactions, and power production.Kincardine, located 15 km southeast of Aberdeen Bay, will feature the five V164-9.5 MW turbines in addition to a single V80-2.0 MW turbine that has already installed. The six-turbine project will feature Windfloat semi-submersible foundations and be in water depth of 60-80 m.More: MHI Vestas confirms Scottish floating windfarm deallast_img read more

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Australia’s booming utility-scale battery market expected to add 500MWh in 2020

first_imgAustralia’s booming utility-scale battery market expected to add 500MWh in 2020 FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享Renew Economy:Australia’s grid-scale battery market had a record year in 2019 and is expected to sail past 500MWh in 2020 and add at least double the amount of new energy storage capacity as the nation’s residential sector.The latest annual Australia Battery Market report from SunWiz says a total of just over 143MWh of commercial and grid-scale batteries was installed in 2019, eclipsing the 69MWh installed in 2018.Not only did this number combine with residential installs to deliver a whole-of-market record for 2019, but it was a record for non-residential scale deployment, with four projects combined delivering as much capacity as the Hornsdale Power Reserve – South Australia’s Big Battery.“This was a record year for battery installation,” said SunWiz managing director and report author Warwick Johnston. “The residential capacity decreased, but this was offset by an increase in non-residential battery capacity to reach a new record year.”And while the cumulative tally for Australian battery installations for 2015-2019 puts residential storage well ahead of non-residential at 738MWh and 361MWh respectively, this trend is expected to be flipped in 2020. According to the report…SunWiz expects “at least 500MWh of non-residential storage to come online in 2020, dwarfing the 143MWh record commissioned in 2019.Renew Economy notes there are a number of projects that did not make the SunWiz list that have a chance to come online this year, or next, including the 600MW Victoria Big Battery (no MWh details yet) proposed by Neoen and Mondo Power.[Sophie Vorrath]More: Australia’s big battery market set to add “at least” 500MWh in 2020last_img read more