Blog Archive

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Guidelines will tackle violence

first_imgGuidelines will tackle violenceOn 10 Oct 2000 in Personnel Today Previous Article Next Article Comments are closed. Related posts:No related photos. The Government is stepping up its zero tolerance campaign to curb violence against front-line health workers. Health authorities and trusts are expected to use new guidance on tackling violence from the Department of Health. This includes advice on staff risk assessment and on providing adequate protection to employees working in the community. NHS organisations will also have to look at introducing crime prevention and safety appliances such as panic buttons, closed-circuit TV and two-way communications systems. According to the guidelines, employers should provide training for staff to help them pacify potentially violent situations or restrain violent patients. And they should provide support for staff who are victims of violence. Under current rules all violent incidents have to be reported, but the guidelines provide managers with advice on how to do this as well as information on how the criminal justice system works should they want to prosecute.Under the zero tolerance campaign the NHS has pledged to reduce violence against its staff by 30 per cent between 1999 and 2003.www.doh.gov.uklast_img read more

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Watch Prince Destroy Solo On Beatles Cover With Tom Petty, Steve Winwood, And More

first_imgUpdate 4/21/16: In the wake of Prince’s death, take a moment and watch one of the most jaw-dropping videos of his career. This sort of clip ultimately defines Prince’s abilities as a musician, coming from out of nowhere and performing an incredible guitar solo, then tossing his guitar nonchalantly in the air just seconds before the video ends. Prince is a true legend, and his music will not soon be forgotten. RIP.More than a decade ago, a bevy of musical legends joined forces on stage to help honor George Harrison’s induction into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame. In what could be considered one of the most remarkable Rock Hall induction ceremony performances of all time, Prince, Tom Petty, Steve Winwood, Jeff Lynne and George’s son Dhani Harrison took the stage in 2004 to perform an incredibly powerful rendition of The Beatles’ “While My Guitar Gently Weeps.” Prince’s solo is just out of this world, concluding with him mysteriously tossing his guitar into the air.Watch the groundbreaking performance below.last_img read more

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Watch Highlights From Dead & Company’s Summer Heater In Hartford [Videos/Gallery]

first_imgA full gallery of images can be seen below. After bringing out debuts and not repeating songs on each of their first four shows, Dead & Company has settled into a deep pocket groove on their summer tour. With a song collection that has surpassed the triple digit milestone, Dead & Company keep fans on their toes by offering up a variety of classic Grateful Dead originals, covers and so much more.The band came out firing at Hartford, CT’s XFINITY Theater last night, opening with “Hell In A Bucket” before bringing out some favorites like the John Mayer led “Cold Rain and Snow” and a cover of Bob Dylan’s “Queen Jane Approximately.” The set also featured Johnny Cash’s “Big River,” and some great tunes like “Row Jimmy,” “Mississippi Half-Step” and “Cumberland Blues.”Set two brought out more Grateful classics, as a pair of favorites “Estimated Prophet” and “Eyes of the World” opened things up. After some blues rock hit the venue with “Deal” and “Viola Lee Blues,” it was Mickey Hart and Bill Kreutzmann who shined during the “Drums” improv, before welcoming the band back to “Space” out. Finally they got back to work, closing out the show with “The Wheel,” “Black Peter,” and “U.S. Blues.” A “Touch Of Grey” encore closed out this fiery show.Full audio can be streamed here:Watch some highlights below.Cold Rain and Snow via Matt FrazierQueen Jane Approximately by Matt FrazierBig River via Matt FrazierRow Jimmy by Matt FrazierEyes Of The World by Matt FrazierCheck out the full setlist below, courtesy of setlist.fm.Additional photos from the show can be viewed below, courtesy of Chad Anderson Photography. Load remaining imageslast_img read more

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Program creates virtual fitting room

first_imgHave you ever bought an item of clothing online that didn’t fit you? Notre Dame graduates John Rocha and Rick Tillilie definitely have, and now they’re doing something about it. Rocha and Tillilie created myFit, a program that uses Microsoft Kinect technology, a device mostly used for video game systems, to scan a person’s three-dimensional image into his or her computer and input it into a virtual fitting room. Rocha said his company’s idea could have a big impact on online retail sales. “Only 10 percent of clothing is sold online, and the reason is consumers lack confidence as to how clothes fit,” Rocha said. “It’s a huge problem for apparel companies in the United States.” Through myFit, online customers can test clothing on an avatar of themselves, and areas of the item are color-coded to indicate whether it is too loose, too tight or just right at those spots, Rocha said.   “First we’re creating body scanners for retail stores, and eventually we’re releasing an at-home version, as well,” he said. “Eventually you’ll be able to create a virtual avatar of yourself with your likeness that contains all of your key measurements to help you make informed buying decisions while shopping online.” Rocha said he and Tillilie came up with the idea for myFit while they were co-presidents of the Entrepreneurship Society at Notre Dame. “My junior year, I had family that worked at Gilt.com … the popular flash-sale site. They had really good deals, and on a college budget, it was the perfect way to do any kind of shopping for clothing that I needed,” Rocha said. “But shopping for jeans was a huge pain because the jeans I was buying would not fit me at all like I envisioned them … It was a situation where there had to be a better way.” Rocha said he and Tillilie presented the problem to members of the Entrepreneurship Society and developed the idea for myFit. They also met with computer science majors and engineers to figure out the technical aspects, Rocha said. Rocha said he, then a political science major, and Tillilie, then a finance major, signed up for the McClosky Business Plan Competition sponsored by the Gigot Center for Entrepreneurship and placed second. Rocha said the two won between $45,000 and $50,000 and a spot at the Plug and Play startup accelerator in Silicon Valley. “It’s a 10-week program where we get an office space, access to mentors and whatnot, and they just try to help us launch our start-up,” he said. “It’s a great opportunity for us to move to Silicon Valley, where we are right now, and to take advantage of the entrepreneurship contacts out here to allow us to move forward.” Rocha and Tillilie will present myFit to possible investors at the Plug and Play Start-up EXPO on September 13th. “Right now all of our time is devoted to the presentation that we give. All the start-ups that are featured there are allotted five minutes or so to pitch in front of 600 investors and tech entrepreneurs in the Silicon Valley area,” Rocha said. “From there, there’s a big trade show … with different booths where you can try technology … It should be our coming out party.” Tillilie said launching a startup post-graduation was an attractive career option for him. “Startups are sort of en vogue right now,” Tillilie said. “It’s pretty low risk coming right out of college because you have a degree and traditional paths to fall back on.” Rocha said Notre Dame students are especially qualified to launch their own startups. “The Notre Dame education makes you really well-rounded, really outgoing, which really helps you do well for this,” Rocha said. “Every day is different when you’re doing a startup, so it takes a really well-rounded person and Notre Dame really prepares you for that.” Tillilie said the Notre Dame network has been helpful in getting myFit off the ground. “There’s a huge amount of mentors and advisors out there that are all part of the Notre Dame alumni that are more than willing to help us out, from little things like advice to even funding opportunities and partnerships with major companies,” Tillilie said. “It’s a huge network that I think is really the best out there.”last_img read more

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Belle competes on “The Voice”

first_imgOne Saint Mary’s student is finally living her dream of becoming a professional singer. Sophomore Sylvia Yacoub, from Muskegon, Mich., was featured this week on “The Voice”, a reality show for aspiring singers to compete and be coached by some of the music industry’s biggest names. Yacoub, who spent last year at the College, is currently taking a year away from school to compete on the show and further her career as a singer. Yacoub’s audition in front of coaches Adam Levine, CeeLo Green, Blake Shelton and Christina Aguilera aired on Tuesday night on NBC. Even though she only aired during this week’s auditions, Yacoub already has a huge fan base at home. “My hometown has been amazing. The support is so humbling to see that just me appearing on ‘The Voice’ has touched so many lives and inspired so many people to go after their dreams,” Yacoub said in a conference call. “Seeing someone from their town and school has really touched so many people in my town. It really means a lot to me.” When a competitor auditions, the coaches have their chairs turned with their back toward the singer for a blind audition. During Yacoub’s performance, Shelton, Green and Aguilera all turned their chairs in hopes of gaining her on their teams. In the end, however, Yacoub picked Aguilera as her coach. “I grew up listening to Christina a lot. She has been such a huge musical influence for me,” Yacoub said. “I tried not to be biased and I listened to all the arguments [of the coaches]. When dealing with nerves and music, I think she can help me the best with where I want to go as far as pop music. “It was probably one of the most exciting and tranquilizing moments of my life. I was so nervous to sing in front of her and when I realized she had turned around; it’s crazy that your idol your whole life had heard something in me.” As for self-promotion for the show, Yacoub has utilized social media to help her connect with her fans back home and at school. “It’s really cool to be able to get feedback from fans and see how many people you’ve actually reached and touched and have been inspired by you,” Yacoub said. “It’s really cool especially when you’re not airing yet.” While Yacoub had to wait until after her audition aired on NBC to share that she was Team Christina, she was still able to update her fans on when she would finally grace the television. “It’s really cool to keep in touch with them and keep them engaged,” Yacoub said. “Then they kind of feel more involved and hopefully they feel more connected with the audience, which is cool about ‘The Voice.’” Before Yacoub made it onto the next round of the show, she had auditioned for other reality shows a couple of years ago. “I wasn’t really doing them for right reasons two years ago,” Yacoub said. “I have a lot more maturity and my voice has grown since then. I am at the right place mentally and vocally and it felt right going into everything now.” Yacoub said she is really excited to have this experience with “The Voice” and hopes it will continue so she may meet her end goal of becoming a professional singer. “I honestly don’t think I would have had this experience two years ago,” she said. “This is such an amazing experience and I can’t believe I am here now.” “The Voice” airs on Mondays and Tuesday’s on NBC at 8 p.m. Contact Jillian Barwick at [email protected]last_img read more

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Saint Mary’s launches mental health initiative focusing on first-year experiences

first_imgEditor’s Note: An earlier version of this article misstated the use of a wellness initiative survey and incorrectly listed Becky Lindstrom and Shay Schneider as faculty members.Saint Mary’s decided to make significant changes to how mental illness is addressed on campus. The College created two new administrative positions to address mental health concerns. With the help of new staff members Becky Lindstrom and Shay Jolly Schneider, the College launched a new wholeness framework designed to address the physical, mental and emotional needs of its students, particularly through restructuring the first-year experience. Lindstrom, a registered life coach, joined the faculty on a two-year contract to help address increasing concerns about wellness and health on campus.“I was brought in by Saint Mary’s late last year to help the school address the rise in stress and anxiety among students,” Lindstrom said. “The initial conversation was about creating a peer coaching cohort, so bringing in a life coach was the logical first step. Since the start, it has gotten so much bigger. There are so many other pieces involved.” Schneider, the new director of retention and first-year experience, said she knew she needed to reach out to new students to address anxieties and improve overall well-being. “I work closely with our first-year programming, whether that be through orientation programs, Belles Beginnings, preview days or the first-year experience course [otherwise known as Sophia Program in Liberal Learning] and the peer mentor program,” she said. “We saw that mental health was one of the main reasons that students were choosing to leave. We realized that the retention piece was not missing anything, but there was something we could do better.”This led Lindstrom and Schneider to combine forces to initiate campus-wide changes, starting with improving some aspects of the freshman experience and educating upperclassmen on how to provide appropriate support and resources. “When [Lindstrom] was brought in, we talked about launching this peer coaching program which we are working on,” Schneider said. “We are looking to recruit members during the fall semester with a formal launch in the spring.”  Lindstrom and Schneider also looked at the first-year program and decided to make some new changes.“In the past, we’ve gotten feedback from first-year students and peer mentors that they felt there was a lack of connection between the two groups,” Schneider said. “Peer mentors didn’t feel like they were having the best opportunities to build relationships with their first years and vice versa. We saw this as an opportunity to reboot our peer mentor program and bring some fresh energy into that.” As new ideas began to develop, Lindstrom created a new wholeness framework to integrate into the SPLL course. “The framework is essentially the idea that if you’re going to educate the whole student, you have to help them help themselves by taking care of physical health, mental wellness and faith and spirituality,” Lindstrom said. “You also need to have the emotional resilience to be able to be aware of what you need to feel fulfilled. So we are trying to build that idea of inherent self-worth in addition to self-awareness and fulfillment.”She said the framework stresses the values of identity and community in the hopes that it will give students resources to succeed.“The framework is truly about developing the person and what it means to be a Saint Mary’s woman,” Schneider said. “We don’t want anyone to feel like they’re just checking off boxes through a program. It’s something that will ultimately help you to help yourself.”  While the programs are specifically geared towards freshmen, many upperclassmen have also been provided with the framework. Lindstrom and Schneider said they hope upperclassmen involvement will help the program spread to the populations they can’t reach. “The focus was to start with the incoming freshmen hoping that this year, these students will become sophomores — who will then eventually become juniors — and within four years, this will be something that’s known around campus,” Lindstrom said. “While we won’t be doing anything for the sophomores, juniors and seniors directly, we’re hoping that within that leadership community of upperclassmen, this program will spread organically.” Peer mentors working with freshmen have noticed a positive change in the restructuring of the first-year program.“I think the wellness program is so helpful, I wish I had it when I was a freshman,” senior peer mentor Liz Ferry said. “It helps us to frame the conversation, not only how to be a good student, but also how to be a good person and how to focus on your mental health, academics and spiritual well-being. That is all part of your experience at Saint Mary’s.”Junior, peer mentor Carin Kaminski thinks the new framework provides practical activities to help overall well-being.“This year we have some new ways to help freshman deal with stress,” Kaminski said. “We introduced this self-planning goal program called WOOP. Also, we have different weeks dedicated to self-awareness, community, how to handle stress and how to get involved on campus.” Kaminski also thinks it puts the freshmen in a better position to utilize the resources the College has to offer. “I think these freshmen know a lot more than what we did,” she said. “I am telling them everything from the bus schedule to all that our academic offices, counseling and health and wellness center have to offer. I just think we’re giving them all the resources that we possibly know, and because of this, they are a lot more prepared than we were.” While many of the program activities are just being introduced, first years are taking the program seriously.“Right now in my SPLL class we’re discussing the basics of college — time management, stress and how to manage it all,” first year Abby Brown said. “When we’re discussing all of this, I take it seriously.”The College hopes the new wellness initiative will have significant short and long-term impacts for the school. Lindstrom said she hopes her presence at the College will ultimately allow this project to grow. “Short term goals have to be simple and effective,” she said. “We hope to show results for the students so that it gives them the momentum to keep doing it. In the long term, I hope the students will take ownership so that when they graduate, it won’t just be about how to be Saint Mary’s students. It will help them live their lives.”For Schenider, creating a better future for Saint Mary’s students is a personal goal. “As an alum, I think about the things I wish that I had as a first year student,” she said. “It’s not that Saint Mary’s is missing anything, it’s that we’ve seen a concern and given this initiative structure. I’m just really grateful for the opportunity to be part of setting the groundwork and hopefully leaving this legacy of what could truly be a student experience unlike any other.” Tags: first-year experience, Mental health, wholeness frameworklast_img read more

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Iberdrola makes big buy into Poland’s developing offshore wind market

first_imgIberdrola makes big buy into Poland’s developing offshore wind market FacebookTwitterLinkedInEmailPrint分享ReNews.biz:Iberdrola is to enter the Polish offshore wind market with an agreement to acquire a 50% stake in developer Sea Wind, which has a seven-project pipeline in early stages of development of up to 7300MW.The Spanish energy company said the deal allows it to further enhance its strategy of geographical diversification in markets with favourable investment conditions, such as the A-credit-rated Poland.The move also allows the company to position itself in the initial stage of development of the country’s offshore wind market, with significant growth potential in the coming decades.Iberdrola said the transaction also promotes the creation of an offshore wind hub in the Baltic Sea which would act as the epicenter of offshore services and local content for the company’s projects in Germany, Poland and Sweden.Both companies previously worked together in the development of the Baltic Eagle project off the German coast.Iberdrola said the alliance with Sea Wind is in-line with its strategy to consolidate as the world’s largest renewable energy company and builds on previous transactions carried out in recent years in the offshore wind business.More: Iberdrola to enter Polish offshore wind marketlast_img read more

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Colombian Army trains Paraguayan soldiers to fight terrorism, drug trafficking

first_imgBy Dialogo August 26, 2014 The Colombian Army has provided training to 75 Paraguayan soldiers to prepare them in their ongoing fight against terrorists and international drug trafficking organizations. The cooperative training program is part of Paraguay’s ongoing effort to improve the professionalism of its security forces. The School of Professional Soldiers of the Colombian Army (ESPRO) trained Paraguayan soldiers at the National Training Center of the National Army ( CENAE) at the Military Fort of Tolemaida according to a CENAE statement. The Colombian soldiers provided three months of training in tactics, fighting terrorism, combating narco-traffickers, and providing humanitarian assistance. The three-month training program concluded Aug. 15. The program included physical fitness drills, shooting practice, patrol exercises, and training in jungle survival skills. The Paraguayan soldiers were greeted by Col. Raul Ortiz, chief of staff and deputy commander of CENAE . Ortiz urged the Paraguayan soldiers to take advantage of the opportunity to “train and prepare to fight illegal armed groups with an Army which has attained worldwide recognition for achieving operational successes in fighting illegal armed organizations.” The cooperative training program was proposed by the government of Colombia through its ambassador in Asuncion, Edgar Augusto Cely Nuñez, who contacted the commander of Paraguay’s Armed Forces, Major General Jorge Francisco Ramírez Gómez, according to news reports. Colombia has “always supported” the Paraguayan military, Ramírez Gómez told Last Time. The Colombian government paid for the expenses incurred by the Paraguayan soldiers. Fighting the EPP The training provided by the Colombian Army will help the Paraguayan soldiers confront the Paraguayan People’s Army (EPP), a terrorist organization which allegedly protects drug traffickers, smuggles cigarettes, and launders drug money, said Gustavo Duncan, a security analyst at the University of Andes in Colombia. Because it attacks police and military forces, commits kidnappings, and claims responsibility for terrorist attacks, the Paraguayan government has classified the EPP as a terrorist organization. For example, in August, 2013, EPP operatives kidnapped security guards at a ranch in Tacuatí and attacked police officers who responded to the scene. The attack killed five people, including one police officer. In 2009, the EPP claimed responsibility for an explosion at the Palace of Justice. Paraguayan authorities also suspect the EPP is involved in drug trafficking. In August, 2013, Paraguay’s National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD) confiscated about 1,800 kilograms of cocaine on several ranches in the northern part of the country. The cocaine had been shipped from Bolivia, authorities said. “We strongly suspect the EPP is offering protection to drug traffickers,” Alejo Vera, a prosecutor with the Public Ministry, said at the time. Drug traffickers cultivate about 48,000 tons of marijuana annually. Drug traffickers transport about 80 percent of that to Brazil. Authorities suspect the EPP is protecting drug traffickers who are transporting marijuana to Brazil, Vera said. Authorities suspect the EPP has formed alliances with regional drug trafficking groups which transport drugs to other South American countries. The EPP has launched attacks against Paraguayan security forces for more than a decade. The EPP operates primarily in the towns of Tacuatí , Ita Paso, Tacuatí Poty , Kurusu Iron, Fortuna, Arrochar, Tuyá Paso, Azotey Hoirqueta, Hugua Paso Barreto and Rhea. Officials estimate that since about 2004, the EPP has obtained $5 million (USD) from kidnappings for ransom and extortion which EPP operatives refer to as the “collection” of “revolutionary taxes,” Total News reported on May 20. The Joint Task Force (FTC), comprised of Paraguayan police and military forces, is confronting the EPP in the northern region of the country, including parts of the department of Concepción. Other organized crime groups In addition to the EPP, it is likely that Mexican and Colombian transnational criminal organizations, such as the Sinaloa Cartel and Clan de los Úsuga, respectively, are increasing their operations in Paraguay, according to security analyst Duncan. While most of the drug trafficking in Paraguay involves the cultivation and shipment of marijuana, drug traffickers also use Paraguay as a transshipment point for cocaine coming from Bolivia, Peru and Colombia. Drug traffickers transport as much as 40 tons of cocaine a year through Paraguay, according to a 2011 United Nations report. Most of those drugs are eventually transported to markets in Europe, Africa, the Middle East, and the United States. Organized crime groups produce about 48,000 tons of drugs every year in Paraguay according to the National Anti-Drug Secretariat (SENAD). The vast majority of the drugs cultivated in Paraguay are marijuana. Organized crime groups cultivate smaller amounts of cocaine. There are about 5,000 to 8,000 hectares of marijuana fields in the country. Each hectare produces about 3,000 kilos of marijuana. In addition to improving the training of its Armed Forces, the Paraguayan government is working to increase the number of soldiers in the military. Currently there are more than 4,300 soldiers in the Paraguayan Armed Forces. The Defense Ministry is launching a campaign in 2014 to encourage young people to join the military. The Defense Ministry hopes to recruit 400 new soldiers by the end of the year. Modernizing the Paraguayan Armed Forces On May 8, the Armed Forces presented to President Horacio Cartes a plan to modernize the military’s equipment, including its weapons and vehicles. The plan covers the Army, Navy, and Air Force. The proposal calls for an expenditure of about $600 million. It calls for the acquisition of fighter jets, helicopters, armored vehicles, artillery ships, radar and new technology. The modernization program will help Paraguayan security forces secure border regions and fight drug traffickers. “There isn’t a single radar to alert (security forces) about a violation of our airspace,” Maj. Gen. Ramírez, the commander of the country’s Armed Forces, told Defensa.com. “Drug trafficking has taken advantage of this weakness for some time.” Useful training Training in Colombia will be helpful to Paraguayan soldiers, Duncan said. Colombian security forces have fought successfully against violent terrorist groups, such as the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC), and drug trafficking organizations, such as Los Rastrojos. Colombian security forces are among the best in the world when it comes to training, the security analyst said. In 2013, Colombian security forces trained 7,679 police agents and Armed Forces members from countries in Central America, South America, and the Caribbean. The Colombian security forces provided training in how to conduct patrols and criminal investigations; the best ways to gather intelligence; fighting drug trafficking, extortion, and kidnapping; and the protection of human rights. Interesting information but the analysis is weak. It doesn’t cover the main focus: the complicity by actions or omissions of successive Paraguayan governments (from 2003 to 2014: Duarte Frutos, Lugo, Franco and now Cartes) with the Group of Enemies and Exterminators of the Paraguayan People, one of the most incompetent manifestations of narco-terrorism in the hemisphere. I hope to God that they come and do their job and apply what they learned in Colombia because lately, the EPP is giving us a hard time here in Paraguay. Just as with the Paraguayan football selection, they chose their coaches poorly. In Colombia, the guerrilla has been going on for 66 years and they are still fighting. They are one of the largest drug producers. The Colombian cartels have expanded no only within the Colombian territory but to other countries. If they couldn’t fix these evils, they obviously don’t know the methods to confront them. So, there’s very little they can teach us in that regard. BEING THAT PARAGUAY….IS A SMALL COUNTRY IT CAN’T LEVERAGETHIS CIRCUMSTANCE TO MOVE FORWARD…THERE’S MUCH TO BE DONE AND MUCH TO LEARNTHAT THE SUPPORT RECEIVED BY FOREIGN ENTITIES…SHOULD BE USED FOR THE GOOD OF THE COUNTRYMANY HAVE TRAVELED AND THE RESULTS HAVE BEEN FEW… Excellent article!! The only way to fight against terrorist groups and other delinquent organizations is by training the soldiers to face them or destroy them some other way. In Paraguay “there’s only one radar to alert (the security forces) on any violation to our air space” said General Ramirez. This tell us that we are completely unprotected from all kinds of marginals. Thanks, Colombia, for the support. WHILE WE ARE TRAINING FOREIGNERS, YOU SHOULD PROTECT US MORE FROM FELONS BECAUSE YOU KNOW WHERE THEY ARE AND ARE JUST PLAYING DUMB. It’d be good if that existed in all countries. It is important to strengthen ties and mutual cooperation with satellite intelligence. May Jehovah bless you The Colombian army and navy are the best here and wherever to chase criminals. Sun sweat and blood is what I always gave to my Colombian homeland. Long live Colombia, God is great and powerful Colombia has 450,000 military troops and they’re put in checkmate by 6,700 narcoterrorists…come to your own conclusion on their effectiveness… It’s part of globalizationIt would be good to have Chilaver train our national team goalies, but in his own way Hey, I am 15 years old my teacher told me to read the news about the political structure of governments. I don’t know if this is a good one but what’s going on with our country. Why do there have to be good and bad people when we all want the same thing ✌✌last_img read more

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Bolivian Army and National Police Eradicate Large Amounts of Illegal Coca

first_imgSince January 1, the Bolivian Army and National Police have eradicated 960 hectares of illegal coca crops that would have been used to make cocaine, Felipe Cáceres, Bolivia’s Vice Minister of Social Defense and Controlled Substances, said on March 25. Since January 1, the Bolivian Army and National Police have eradicated 960 hectares of illegal coca crops that would have been used to make cocaine, Felipe Cáceres, Bolivia’s Vice Minister of Social Defense and Controlled Substances, said on March 25. The Colombian National Army’s Infantry Battalion No. 47’s General Francisco de Paula Vélez Unit destroyed two cocaine laboratories belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and two others operated by Clan Úsuga. In Bolivia, farmers working on behalf of drug trafficking organizations cultivated 23,000 hectares to grow coca in 2013, the smallest number of hectares used for such purposes since 2002, according to the International Narcotics Control Board. Bolivia grows limited amounts of legal coca, which is used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. In Bolivia, farmers working on behalf of drug trafficking organizations cultivated 23,000 hectares to grow coca in 2013, the smallest number of hectares used for such purposes since 2002, according to the International Narcotics Control Board. Bolivia grows limited amounts of legal coca, which is used in teas, medicine, and during Andean religious rites. The Colombian National Army’s Infantry Battalion No. 47’s General Francisco de Paula Vélez Unit destroyed two cocaine laboratories belonging to the Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia (FARC) and two others operated by Clan Úsuga. Colombian National Army destroys 4 cocaine-producing laboratories The Army didn’t immediately report the names of the three suspects they captured during the raids. Three of the laboratories were in the Department of Chocó, while the other was in the Department of Antioquia. Soldiers and police concentrated their eradication efforts in the tropical regions of Yungas and Cochabamba; they’re also searching for illegal coca plantations in natural parks and ecological reserves nationwide to prevent the country’s resources from being exploited by narcotraffickers. The unit, which is part of the Army’s Seventeenth Brigade, collectively seized 88 kilograms of chopped coca leaves, 390 gallons of gasoline and 171 kilograms of urea among other supplies and equipment. Each laboratory could produce more than 80 kilograms of cocaine monthly; thus the raids dealt a severe financial blow to the FARC and Clan Úsuga, as each kilogram of cocaine was worth about $80 million Colombian pesos (about $31,551 dollars). Colombian National Army destroys 4 cocaine-producing laboratories By Dialogo March 31, 2015 Soldiers and police concentrated their eradication efforts in the tropical regions of Yungas and Cochabamba; they’re also searching for illegal coca plantations in natural parks and ecological reserves nationwide to prevent the country’s resources from being exploited by narcotraffickers. The unit, which is part of the Army’s Seventeenth Brigade, collectively seized 88 kilograms of chopped coca leaves, 390 gallons of gasoline and 171 kilograms of urea among other supplies and equipment. Each laboratory could produce more than 80 kilograms of cocaine monthly; thus the raids dealt a severe financial blow to the FARC and Clan Úsuga, as each kilogram of cocaine was worth about $80 million Colombian pesos (about $31,551 dollars). The Army didn’t immediately report the names of the three suspects they captured during the raids. Three of the laboratories were in the Department of Chocó, while the other was in the Department of Antioquia.last_img read more

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Why your smartphone costs more than you realize

first_imgMany smartphone apps, including budgeting and price comparison tools, can help you save money. But data plans exact a steeper monthly cost than most simple cellphone plans, and in-app purchases lead to overspending. Here are eight hidden costs associated with smartphones and tips on how to reduce them:1. The data plan. The monthly fee you pay for access to the Internet and streaming capabilities costs anywhere from $15 a month to as high as $80 or more, depending on your usage needs. If you use more data than your plan allows, you’ll be charged “overage” fees on top of that monthly fee. To keep costs down, assess what you need from your data plan during a month of typical use, and choose the cheaper plan that will still keep you from going over the data limit – and racking up those extra fees.2. Apps. Apps are what make smartphones so invaluable to busy people: You can shop, check your bank account, play games, track what friends are up to and follow social media accounts through apps. They can also come with a price, though: Many apps cost money to download, and others allow for in-app purchases. You could end up spending more money through apps just because it’s so easy. continue reading » 25SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblrlast_img read more