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Image of the Day: GW Enjoys Fireworks in Yokosuka

first_img View post tag: News by topic View post tag: GW View post tag: Japan Fireworks erupt above the Yokosuka skyline during a New Year’s Eve celebration as seen from the flight deck of the Nimitz-class aircraft carrier USS George Washington (CVN 73).George Washington and its embarked air wing, Carrier Air Wing (CVW) 5, provide a combat-ready force that protects and defends the collective maritime interests of the U.S. and its allies and partners in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.[mappress mapid=”14835″] Authorities Image: U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 3rd Class Chris Cavagnaro View post tag: Image of the Day View post tag: Fireworks View post tag: Navy Image of the Day: GW Enjoys Fireworks in Yokosuka View post tag: asia Back to overview,Home naval-today Image of the Day: GW Enjoys Fireworks in Yokosuka View post tag: Enjoys View post tag: Naval January 5, 2015 View post tag: Yokosuka Share this articlelast_img read more

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US, Portugal, Spain Conclude Exercise MAFRE-15

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today US, Portugal, Spain Conclude Exercise MAFRE-15 View post tag: Portugal View post tag: US May 13, 2015 View post tag: Navy View post tag: News by topic Share this article View post tag: MAFRE-15center_img View post tag: Spain View post tag: europe US, Portugal, Spain Conclude Exercise MAFRE-15 Authorities From May 4-8, the Mine Countermeasures Force (FMCM), with its MCM Diving Unit, organized exercise MAFRE-15 off the coast of Cartagena with participation of the U.S. Navy’s EODMU-8 stationed in Rota Naval Base, the Portuguese Navy’s Destacamento de Mergulhadores Sapadores Num 1 and the Spanish Navy’s MCM Diving Unit.The Exercise was oriented towards underwater EOD (Explosive Ordnance Disposal) drills and IED (Improvised Explosive Devices) clearance.Three main aspects were envisioned:– Mine sequence (hunt, localization, identification and disposal) of bottom and tethered mines.– Pouncer and Lift Tow Beach operations. Hunting of an adrift tethered mine; disposal and laying of an intelligence-gathering device on a beach.– Mine clearance operations. Underwater improvised explosive devices in port.One of the main advantages of this type of trilateral exercises is the comparison and standardization of TTPs (Tactical Techniques and Procedures), as well as the interoperability of different units from several countries, thus enhancing the training level of participating units.[mappress mapid=”15963″]Image: Spanish Navy View post tag: Exerciselast_img read more

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Osborne ducks pasty question

first_imgWatch Chancellor George Osborne squirm as he is asked in parliament when was the last time he bought a pastyTo signal your displeasure, sign the online petition at: http://epetitions.direct.gov.uk/petitions/32044 or can visit our Facebook campaign page at http://www.facebook.com/saynotopietax.last_img

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LCD Soundsystem Announces 7-Night Run At Brooklyn Steel

first_imgLCD Soundsystem have just announced seven nights at the new Brooklyn Steel, starting THIS Friday! Only two months after the venue’s opening, which featured five shows from LCD Soundsystem, the Brooklyn Steel will once again host the electronic rock band on June 16, 17, 19, 20, 21, 23, and 24. The band used their initial stage presence to perform a few songs off their upcoming record, which fans will assumably hear more from across these upcoming shows.Frontman James Murphy‘s most recent update states: “we’re done with the record. like, totally done with the music and mixing. just some art stuff to finish, but it’s been mastered already and the lacquers are winging their way to the pressing plant (which is, i think, where they’ll make the mothers and stampers, etc.).” Read the full statement here.LCD Soundsystem has so far shared two songs from the forthcoming new album, “call the police” and “american dream.” Hear them both below:Do not miss LCD Soundsystem for another hometown throwdown. Tickets to the upcoming shows go on sale 6/15 at 10AM EST. All ticketing information can be found on the Brooklyn Steel website.last_img read more

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Better Functioning Tech Makes for Less Stress at Work

first_imgOur Evolving Relationship with TechnologyTechnology helps us connect, learn, get work done and reimagine our daily lives. Yet as we rely more on technology, we become more sensitive to its performance highs and lows. As the pressure to perform increases, businesses who understand the impact tech has on people are at an advantage. Not only can they offer a better experience – they can help employees become more efficient and effective.At Dell, we use research to understand our customers’ needs and to drive innovations as those needs change. That’s why we embarked on our first ever neuroscience “Brain on Tech” study earlier this year. Our objective was to explore the intertwining relationship humans have with technology and how it affects our ability to work. We wanted to know the impact of technology performance on our overall well-being.Together with EMOTIV, the global leader in portable brain sensing technologies and consumer neuroscience, participants’ brain activity was monitored in real time (via EEG scanning headsets) while they worked and interacted with technology. This let us go far beyond the fill-in-the-bubble-survey, providing rich scientific results.<span style=”display: inline-block; width: 0px; overflow: hidden; line-height: 0;” data-mce-type=”bookmark” class=”mce_SELRES_start”></span>While at first glance the results of the study confirmed what we assumed – experiences with high functioning and reliable technology and non-responsive or failing technology directly impact productivity and how employees feel – the profound extent this correlation had was astounding.Using Technology to Supercharge Productivity and EfficiencyIn our new era, PCs are often the only physical connection an employee has to a company. It’s pretty incredible when you stop and think about it: this device is not only just for work, but also the gateway to engage with company culture and connect with customers and coworkers. And for many, IT is no longer just a cubicle over to help with system crashes or computer lockouts.“In our new era, PCs are often the only physical connection an employee has to a company.”ShareWhat does that mean for business owners, IT experts, HR leaders and employees? The Brain on Tech research revealed that it is more important than ever to provide employees with solid, functioning technology. From day one, a great experience with your work PC is vital and ensures optimum productivity. For example:Employees can achieve an astounding 37 percent more in a workday when using technology that is not only newer but supported with the correct software and services.For every hour worked, good tech can save employees 23 minutes per hour or fifteen hours in a 40-hour work week. (How is that for a benefit to the bottom line!)A bad technology experience impedes employee performance by more than 30 percent on average, regardless of a user’s perceived computer literacy.There are generational impacts. Younger Millennials and Gen Zers (those surveyed under the age of 26), were most impacted by a bad tech experience, performing twice as poorly as older participants in the study.Delivering the Best Technology Experiences Impact How Employees FeelChallenging technology can make today’s new work-life dynamic more stressful. Our research showed that well-functioning technology can positively impact feelings and relieve stress for employees, creating both emotional benefits as well a lasting impact on retention. For example:(Almost) everyone loves puppies. Receiving different technology that is enabled with the power and tools end-users need to be successful after dealing with technology that is flawed by common IT issues was equally as exciting as watching videos of puppies.The study measured excitement once participants received and used new, better functioning computers. The change of equipment induced more excitement than receiving a monetary reward upon completion of the experiment.How study participants rebounded from the stress of a bad tech experience became an important piece of data as it demonstrated the effect stress has over an extended period, like a 9 a.m. to 5 p.m. workday. The results show that it those experiencing these high stress moments take three times longer to relax and recover even when listening to relaxing music, when compared to those experiencing less stressful moments in the workday.Timely technology refreshes can also benefit stress levels. Employees that have bad technology experiences during their workday feel twice as stressed, which is almost 30% more stressful than being asked to sing a song in public.Keeping employees productive and happy is a top priority for companies today as they try to combat burnout, and businesses have the power to address this with great technology experiences. For example, make sure employees have the right technology set-up – including software and peripherals – or have the opportunity to customize their set-up to best fit their needs. Leverage solutions and services like PC as a Service (PCaaS) to help modernize the employee experience with subscription-based pricing and no upfront investment. Deliver easily managed and secure technology directly to the employee with minimal set-up required. And encourage workday flexibility. (For more suggestions, read here).In the “Work from Anywhere” world, people, productivity, health and well-being matter. The best investment any business can make to reduce stress and improve productivity is to provide reliable, seamless technology experiences to reduce friction and help employees achieve their work goals.The Experiment MethodologyIn early 2020, Dell and EMOTIV developed a custom experiment to measure the reactions of users of various ages and computer literacy levels as they completed cognitively challenging tasks under time using both good and bad PC technology. EMOTIV’s EPOC+ wireless Brainwear® headsets were used to collect participants’ brain data in a work environment. Levels of stress, focus, excitement and frustration were assessed in real-time leveraging EMOTIV’s proprietary machine learning algorithms.EMOTIV researchers studied adult users representative of a modern workforce, including mixed gender, ages, computer literacy and familiarity with computerized workplaces. Participants in a work environment were required to complete cognitively challenging tasks under time pressure with the prospect of a reward tied to the level of completion of the tasks.Two conditions were tested in a block design using similar task loads. In the “Bad Computer” experimental condition, users were provided with an unreliable laptop with planted bugs, while during condition “Good Computer,” users were provided with high-performing computers and screens which streamlined the user experience.EMOTIV also recorded brain activity during various baseline, rest and recovery control conditions and provided happy and stressful videos in order to benchmark responses against known experiences and to measure recovery times.***Research participants used identical Dell Latitude systems and accessories; “bad tech” users had bugs introduced which replicate the common system and software failures. These failures included insufficient bandwidth, memory, security failure, OS update failure. All research participants completed a series of including drafting and sending emails, creating documents and spreadsheets, connecting to wireless networks, changing passwords, configuring their SSO and attending virtual meetings.last_img read more

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Long Live the Queens! Tony Nominee Brad Oscar to Host Pageant: The Musical Comedy Beauty Contest

first_img Like every beauty pageant you’ve seen before, Pageant features contestants desperately vying for a glittering tiara. With swimsuit, talent and evening gown competitions, the show includes both the thrill of victory and the agony of defeat. Unlike some beauty pageants you’ve seen before, the female contestants are all played by men and the audience gets to select the winner each night. View Comments For the first time in more than 20 years, Pageant: The Musical Comedy Beauty Contest is returning to the New York stage. Hosted by Tony nominee Brad Oscar (The Producers, Big Fish), the queens are back to benefit Broadway Cares/Equity Fights Aids. Directed by Matt Lentz, the audience interactive spectacle will run each Monday night in February at the Red Lacquer Club. Conceived by Robert Longbottom, Pageant is written by two-time Tony nominee Bill Russell (Side Show, The Last Smoker in America) and Frank Kelly with music by Albert Evans. Pageant features choreography by Shea Sullivan, music direction by Mark Hartman, costumes by Stephen Yearick, scenic design by Paul DePoo and lighting by Paul Miller. Joining Oscar onstage will be tiara-crazed beauties including Nick Cearley (The Skivvies), Frankie James Grande (Mamma Mia), Douglas Lyons (Beautiful), Alex Ringler (West Side Story), Marty Thomas (Xanadu) and Seth Tucker (My Kiki).last_img read more

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Tix Now On Sale for Martha Clarke and Alfred Uhry’s Angel Reapers

first_img Angel Reapers Related Shows Tickets are now available for Martha Clarke and Alfred Uhry’s Angel Reapers off-Broadway. The production is set to begin previews on February 2 and will play a limited engagement through March 13. Opening night is scheduled for February 22 in The Romulus Linney Courtyard Theatre at The Pershing Square Signature Center.Directed and choreographed by Clarke, the show will feature traditional Shaker songs and a mix of modern dance and actual Shaker movements. Angel Reapers follows the Shakers, an early American religious sect, which sought to connect with God through ecstatic ritual and strict celibacy. While the congregants strive desperately to maintain divine purity, the needs of the flesh threaten to take hold.The cast will include Sophie Bortolussi, Nicholas Bruder, Asli Bulbul, Lindsey Dietz Marchant, Ingrid Kapteyn, Rico Lebron, Gabrielle Malone, Sally Murphy, Matthew Oaks, Andrew Robinson and yon tande. View Comments Show Closed This production ended its run on March 20, 2016last_img read more

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Michael Esper on Playing Tom in London’s Glass Menagerie & More

first_imgMichael Esper in ‘The Glass Menagerie'(Photo: Johan Persson) View Comments Broadway actor Michael Esper has made a sizable impression on the London stage of late, moving from his acclaimed performance opposite Michael C. Hall in the U.K. stage debut of the David Bowie-scored Lazarus to his current run as Tom, opposite Cherry Jones’s Amanda, in The Glass Menagerie at the Duke of York’s Theatre. With a list of credits that further includes Nicky Silver’s play The Lyons, the Green Day musical American Idiot and the Sting musical The Last Ship, the immensely charming Esper took time early one recent evening to talk about the excitement of being a theatrical expat.What’s it been like doing two shows back to back in London?Totally insane! I went home for about a month between doing The Glass Menagerie last summer [in Edinburgh] and starting Lazarus here in order to see people and get my affairs in order and then I darted back [to London]. All told, and not including Edinburgh, this will have been a seven-month stint.How did that come about?Honestly, it wasn’t really intentional at all. Lazarus came up first and I knew I wanted to be part of that and didn’t want to let it go, having done it in New York, and then The Glass Menagerie came up as part of the Edinburgh International Festival, so I did that and while that was happening, the word came that we might be moving to London and Sonia [Friedman, producer] and Cherry [Jones, star] and everybody managed to time it out so that I would be able to take part in it on the West End. I’m bursting with gratitude about how it has all gone.Was there a period when Lazarus and The Glass Menagerie overlapped?Yes, I was rehearsing Menagerie during the day for a week and a half while we were still doing Lazarus: it was wild! It certainly felt pretty psychologically nuts to be working on both those shows at the same time, but it always feels good to be thoroughly used up creatively.Had you seen John Tiffany’s production of Tennessee Williams’s classic when it was on Broadway with Zachary Quinto as Tom? I did see it, and it was totally stunning—so stunning and so moving. Even though it’s a play I had known so well since I was a kid, something about the production felt very fresh to me, and I was experiencing things in the play as an audience member that I had never experienced before, no matter times I had read or seen it. There were so many things that surprised me, and I was moved in places where I was never moved before. What were your thoughts on stepping into the production, first for Edinburgh and now London?Very strange, not least because I’d never had that experience before. I had trepidation not in terms of not wanting to do it but maybe anxiety is a better way to put it. But luckily, I had this incredible team of people on both sides of the line [onstage and off] who somehow magically allowed me both to find my way into the role myself and also to brilliantly guide me. There’s something also about the play that is so porous that the experience of seeing it wasn’t the obstacle that it might have been with a different type of show. What are your feelings about Tom, who, of course, narrates the action and is seen by many as a surrogate version of Tennessee Williams himself? I think he is a haunted, hunted person. Tennessee describes him as someone not without pity but who is forced to act the way that he does in order to escape from the trap that is that home. The speech he gives at the end comes from someone who cannot escape the memory of the family he has left behind and, thinking outside the play, knowing what we know about Rose [Williams’ sister] adds weight to it, as well. Is it a cathartic role to inhabit?It is very beautiful and rejuvenating in a strange way, but a lot of good writing is like that. Really excellent writing can ask a lot of you, but it also gives back: it returns the investment. The tricky thing for me, I’ve found, has to do with the lyricism of the text. The fact is, those words will speak themselves but it can be so easy to just say the beautiful thing and lose sight of the action and intention behind the thought. How does it feel that your director on the musical The Last Ship, Joe Mantello, is currently playing Tom in the new Broadway Glass Menagerie, with Sally Field? I’ll tell you, I love Joe so much and loved working with him as a director and he’s also a fucking astonishing actor—a real artist. I got to have this experience with him where we got together over the summer to talk about this part together, which is something you just never get to do as an actor where you’re normally working in isolation. So, to get to talk to another actor who’s working on the same material, especially one I admire as much as I admire Joe, was something else. He’s going to be so remarkable in that part, I just know. I wouldn’t miss it for the world.What about your musical theater resume, which embraces an astonishing array of rock and pop legends from David Bowie and Sting through to Green Day?None of that was part of any plan on my part: I mean, I’m always happy to work on anything. But I think I’m more suited towards music that is written in that style and so it’s much harder for me to imagine doing a more traditional musical; I don’t know if I could do it. Also, I write music and play music and have a little sister, Shannon, who is in an amazing band called The Echo Friendly. I’m a songwriter, but there’s a big difference between being a songwriter and being able to write a musical. How would you contrast working with Bowie and with Sting? They’re very different people. They are—or in Bowie’s case were—exceptionally kind and supportive and wonderful to work with in different ways, but Sting, I would say, was much more hands on, whereas Bowie would sort of watch us and would say supportive things without being in the center of it in quite the same way. Sting was much more involved in that he, of course, stepped into the show for a period and that process also involved several workshops, so it was a much longer developmental period. Was it difficult performing Lazarus here in London given that the production inevitably had a commemorative feel?It just felt incredibly charged, especially the night before we closed. There was something about that Saturday night that just felt like—I’m not sure how to talk about it, really. I know that was a show and an experience that will be with me forever.What are your plans once Menagerie finishes at the end of April?I’m going to go home to New York and see my family and friends and take a little while to recoup and catch up and then start hustling up work—and protesting.Has it felt odd to be out of the U.S. during so tumultuous a period?I thought maybe that would be a good thing, but I’ve felt such a deep need to be around my community and to take action that it has felt hard to be away. But in the last few weeks, I feel as if there’s been a strong sense of alarm and action [in the U.K.] as well. I’ve found the activism here to be very comforting.last_img read more

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Increasing the Itch – Study Says Climate Change Brings More Poison Ivy with Greater Potency

first_imgThis summer I realized there’s something out there in the world I hate more than cauliflower and rush hour traffic-poison ivy. The leaves of three just won’t let me be. Despite never having a reaction in the past, this year I’ve had four outbreaks of blistering rashes, including one on my face. I used to frolic through the woods with carefree grace, but now my trail runs are filled with tip-toeing and wearing knee-high socks. I’ve been so plagued that Calamine is calling me with stock options. Am I just on a run of bad luck, or is poison ivy growth on the rise?Unfortunately, the latter is true, and poison ivy growth is only going to get worse as we keep polluting the atmosphere with cars and coal-burning smokestacks. Rising amounts of carbon dioxide a greenhouse gas that is considered one of the leading causes of global warming have been proven to dramatically increase the growth of the allergenic plant and help it spread its itchy wrath.Last year Duke University completed a six-year study that found elevated levels of carbon dioxide increased the growth of poison ivy. Scientists used pipes to pump carbon dioxide into an experimental forest near Chapel Hill, N.C. At carbon dioxide levels expected by the year 2050, poison ivy in the forest grew at a 70 percent higher annual rate than it does today.The study also showed that high-carbon dioxide plants produce a more potent form of urushiol-the oil agent that causes an allergic skin reaction in 80 percent of people that come in contact with the pesky plant. Urushiol is the plant’s defense mechanism against irritants in the atmosphere.“Elevated carbon dioxide levels promote the growth of poison ivy,” says Dr.William Schlesinger, a retired Duke professor who helped lead the study. “The changes that human beings are making in the world’s atmosphere are having some real human health consequences. We need to make a change globally, so we don’t see more cases of extreme dermatitis and emergency room visits.”Poison ivy is widespread and can grow in many forms: as a vine, ground cover, or upright. It changes colors by season, but it is always able to release urushiol. Widespread in the Southeast, it is one of the most problematic plants in the country-annually causing 350,000 reported cases of some kind of dermatitis.In the Blue Ridge, it can be often confused with the nonpoisonous Virginia creeper, which has leaves with a similar tear-drop shape but usually has five leaves on a stem.One common myth is that you can spread the rash to others or other parts of your body once it has surfaced on the skin. It’s only the urushiol oil that can spread and cause more irritation, but it can stick to shoes, pets, and garden tools. Poison ivy is also receptive to light, so areas that have been logged or thinned are likely to see more poison ivy growth.last_img read more