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Mayor says he wishes driver in fatal crash was under arrest

first_imgSpencer Platt/Getty Images(NEW YORK) — New York City Mayor Bill de Blasio said Wednesday the driver who fatally struck two children in Park Slope on Monday should never have been behind the wheel.Investigators believe the driver, 44-year-old Dorothy Bruns, suffered a seizure, NYPD Chief of Transportation Thomas Chan told reporters Wednesday.The mayor called it “deeply, deeply troubling” the woman still had a license, which has since been suspended.“Something is wrong with our laws that we need to fix,” de Blasio said. He promised to offer specifics next week.“I wish she was under arrest right now,” the mayor added.Chan declined to elaborate on Bruns’ medical condition, but one witness reported the driver was foaming at the mouth. Investigators are subpoenaing her medical records.“Any life lost in a traffic fatality is bad but our children are our most valuable treasures in our lives and to lose these two children, we know all New Yorkers feel for this particular family,” Chan said.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Flouting stress rules will land you in court

first_img Previous Article Next Article Employers that flout the Health and Safety Executive’s (HSE) stressmanagement standards being introduced next year are likely to face prosecutionunder existing health and safety law. Elizabeth Gyngell, head of health strategy at the HSE, announced the launchof the draft stress management standards pilot scheme. She confirmed that firmsbreaching the rules may be prosecuted under the Health and Safety at Work Act. A group of about 20 public and private sector employers have started to testthe standards, that eventually all employers will have to meet to prove theyare managing stress in the workplace responsibly. However, Gyngell, speaking exclusively to Personnel Today, reassuredemployers that the draft standards are not set in stone and said they can helpshape the final version of the standards by accessing them on the HSE’s websitefrom next month, and giving the safety body their feedback. She also emphasisedthat prosecution would only ever be a last resort. The six-month trial will be followed by the publication of a discussiondocument, in January next year, and a formal consultation period before thefirst standards are introduced later in 2004. The standards are based on the HSE’s seven causes of stress, identified inits guide Tackling Work-Related Stress that covers areas such as workloads,working hours and the support staff receive at work. Steve Clark, assistant head of HR at Sheffield City Council, which is one ofthe organisations piloting the standards, thinks the HSE’s draft standards arepractical and will not be too onerous for employers. “A lot of it is aboutgood management practice that most employers will be doing anyway,” hesaid. The new standards reflect the HSE’s increasing concern over stress at work,highlighted by figures which show the number of working days lost to stress,anxiety or depression in 2001 was 13.5 million. By Ben Willmottwww.hse.gov.uk Comments are closed. Flouting stress rules will land you in courtOn 22 Apr 2003 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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Latitudinal beaming of planetary radio emissions

first_imgThe Voyager missions have revealed that jovian kilometric radiation (emanating from Jupiter’s magnetosphere) is beamed away from the zenomagnetic equator. Results from GEOS 1 show that terrestrial non-thermal continuum or myriametric radiation is similarly beamed away from the geomagnetic equator. A mode-coupling mechanism is proposed such that measurements of the direction of propagation of the escaping O-mode radiations may allow the construction of the first high-resolution maps of the shapes of the equatorial plasmapause and Io torus.last_img read more

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The impact of wintertime sea ice anomalies on high surface heat flux events in the Iceland and Greenland Seas

first_imgThe gyres of the Iceland and Greenland Seas are regions of deep-water formation, driven by large ocean-to-atmosphere heat fluxes that have local maxima adjacent to the sea-ice edge. Recently these regions have experienced a dramatic loss of sea ice, including in winter, which begs the question have surface heat fluxes in the adjacent ocean gyres been affected? To address this a set of regional atmospheric climate model simulations has been run with prescribed sea ice and sea surface temperature fields. Three 20-year model experiments have been examined: Icemax, Icemed and Icemin, where the surface fields are set as the year with maximum, median and minimum sea-ice extents respectively. Under conditions of reduced sea-ice extent there is a 15% (19 W m−2) decrease in total wintertime heat fluxes in the Iceland Sea. In contrast, there is an 8% (9 W m−2) increase in heat fluxes in the Greenland Sea primarily due to higher local SSTs. These differences are manifest as changes in the magnitude of high heat flux events (such as cold air outbreaks). In the Iceland Sea, 76% of these events are lower in magnitude during reduced sea-ice conditions. In the Greenland Sea, 93% of these events are higher in magnitude during reduced sea-ice conditions as a result of higher SSTs coincident with retreating sea ice. So, in these experiments, the reduced wintertime sea-ice conditions force a different response in the two seas. In both gyres, large-scale atmospheric circulation patterns are key drivers of high heat flux events.last_img read more

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Connells celebrates the ultimate company man: Chief Executive David Livesey

first_imgConnells is celebrating the 30th work anniversary of its Group Chief Executive David Livesey, highlighting his achievements and influence on the company and the wider industry.Livesey joined Connells to head up its fledgling mortgage division but went on to create or develop some of the most successful parts of the business, which is the only major player in the industry to have not joined go for a City listing nor embrace franchising or hybrid estate agency, except its brief but unhappy ownership of Hatched.The 61-year-old is also credited with diversifying Connells’ income stream, expanding the business via acquisition, launching its sales progression digital offering Mio and most famously its lucrative but sometimes controversial business connections to Zoopla.He was also part of the team that completed the management buy-out of Connells from Scottish Widows in 1996, assisted by Skipton Building Society, which took a majority shareholding.Challenging“Within a few days of joining Connells Group I knew that I had found the permanent home for my career, and it has been challenging, fulfilling and fun in equal measurement,” he says.“There aren’t many businesses nowadays where so many of the team have worked together for so long which tells you everything about this company.“We have the best people in the industry at Connells Group and I am most proud of the careers that we have helped create over the years, the great customer service that those colleagues have delivered and, as a result, the absolute, unchallenged, clear market leadership in our profession that we have achieved.”Connells Group Chairman Stephen Shipperley says: “He has a great instinct for innovating and initiating some of the things that we take for granted in the business, and indeed the property industry.“We congratulate David on his milestone anniversary and thank him for his continued commitment.”MIO connells David Livesey July 30, 2020Nigel LewisWhat’s your opinion? Cancel replyYou must be logged in to post a comment.Please note: This is a site for professional discussion. Comments will carry your full name and company.This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.Related articles BREAKING: Evictions paperwork must now include ‘breathing space’ scheme details30th April 2021 City dwellers most satisfied with where they live30th April 2021 Hong Kong remains most expensive city to rent with London in 4th place30th April 2021 Home » News » Agencies & People » Connells celebrates the ultimate company man: Chief Executive David Livesey previous nextAgencies & PeopleConnells celebrates the ultimate company man: Chief Executive David LiveseyCompany issues a celebration of its Chief Executive’s 30-year-career but omits his closure of hybrid agency Hatched and the OTM/Gascoigne Halman court case.Nigel Lewis30th July 202001,270 Viewslast_img read more

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Assistant Professor – Cardio/Thoracic

first_imgDivision: Surgery (80001020)Department: Surgery – Cardio/Thoracic Surgery (90002458)Employment Duration: Full-timeBaylor College of Medicine and Department Summary:Baylor ( www.bcm.edu ) isrecognized as one of the nation’s premier academic health sciencecenters and is known for excellence in education, research, andhealthcare and community service. Located in the heart of theworld’s largest medical center ( Texas MedicalCenter ), Baylor is affiliated with multiple educational,healthcare and research affiliates ( Baylor Affiliates).SummaryThe Division of Cardiothoracic Surgery in the Michael E. DeBakeyDepartment of Surgery at the Baylor College of Medicine (BCM) isseeking a cardiothoracic surgeon to join our Adult Cardiac Surgeryprogram at Baylor St. Luke’s Medical Center (BSLMC), also home tothe Texas Heart Institute (THI). Substantial resources will beavailable to a successfully recruited candidate to further grow anddevelop a nationally prominent clinical and research program inadult cardiac surgery. Ideal candidates will have completed anadvanced fellowship in cardiac surgery. Our program specializes inthe treatment of complex cardiac surgery patients through uniqueminimally invasive techniques for valve surgery, coronary arterybypass surgery, aortic surgery, as well as transcatheter andendovascular procedures. Specific interest in minimally invasive orarterial conduit bypass surgery desirable.Enthusiastic applicants seeking a perfect balance of excellence inpatient care and a wide range of opportunities for scholarlyactivities should upload the following for consideration:curriculum vitae and as a single document a: narrative descriptionof clinical, research and academics, as well as resident teachingexperience and a list of references uploaded to the ‘References’upload.Job Qualifications:Candidates should have a strong commitment to teachingcardiothoracic surgery residents and advanced fellows anddeveloping/participating in clinical/translational researchefforts. The candidate will also act as part of the larger adultcardiothoracic team at BSLMC/THI and Baylor College of Medicine.ABTS board certification or board eligibility is required and thecandidate must qualify for a full and unrestricted Texas medicallicense. An established track record in clinical research ispreferred.Baylor College of Medicine is an Equal Opportunity/AffirmativeAction/Equal Access Employer.889CA; CHlast_img read more

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Did you miss these stories over the weekend?

first_imgIn Jersey City, even though downtown Grand Street is four lanes wide in some places, it’s still not safe enough for bicyclists, considering the large volume of cars traveling at high speed. At least, that’s according to members of Bike JC, who are among the local groups that have petitioned the city to make changes to the street as part of a bicycle safety initiative. Bike JC members say Grand Street epitomizes the dangers bicyclists face in the city, and why many ride on sidewalks instead of the street. Members of Bike JC appeared at the Dec.12 City Council caucus and again in greater numbers at the regular meeting on Dec. 14 to present ideas for a redesign of Grand Street that would emulate some of the “road diet” changes along Observer Highway in Hoboken. There, narrowed car lanes and dedicated bicycles lanes have been created to improve safety for bike riders, pedestrians and even drivers of cars and trucks. Click here for more.In Hoboken, nearly two months after a commuter train crashed into a platform at the Hoboken terminal, killing a young mother who had just dropped her daughter at day care, the events leading up to the accident remain a mystery. On Thursday, Sept. 29, around 8:45 a.m., a NJ Transit train from the suburbs failed to slow down as it entered the Erie Lackawanna Train Terminal near the Hoboken/Jersey City border, and crashed into the concrete platform at the end of the line. The collision injured more than 100 people and killed Fabiola De Kroon of Hoboken, 34, who was hit by debris outside the train. A spokesman for the National Transportation and Safety Board (NTSB) told the Reporter on Sept. 30 that the federal agency would not have a final report or answers for the public for at least a year after the crash. The agency has been investigating since then, and has released some preliminary findings that contradict the train engineer’s recollection of that morning. Click here for more. × In North Bergen, more than 500 children received gifts like dolls, bikes, tablets, guitars, drones and more at a party Saturday, Dec. 3 in the North Bergen Recreation Center. The money for the gifts and party came from the town budget, approximately $25,000, said Town Administrator Chris Pianese. Commissioner Hugo Cabrera said, “There are a lot of elves in the recreation department.” Those elves gave popular toys to kids ages 2 through 9, including Easy Bake Ovens, Nerf guns, sewing machines, and 125 Amazon Fire tablets. The kids also took pictures with Mr. and Mrs. Claus. Click here for more.last_img read more

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Winter Holiday Showcase coming to The Historic Landmark Loews Theater

first_imgThe Kennedy Dancers, Inc. Dear Editor: The Kennedy Dancers, Diane Dragone, Executive Director, Friends of the Loews Theater Inc., and New Jersey State Council on the Arts are excited to announce the Winter Holiday Showcase on Friday Dec. 15 at 7 p.m. at the Historic Landmark Loews Theater, 54 Journal Square Plaza, Jersey City.Ticket prices are $20 presale, $23 at the door. For tickets call (201) 659-2190, or mail checks payable to “The Kennedy Dancers” to The Kennedy Dancers studio, 79 Central Ave., Jersey City, New Jersey 07307. This special occasion is made possible with the help of Friends of Loews. This production is a fundraising event and ticket sales will defray the cost of the Kennedy Dancers many outreach programs.Winter Holiday Showcase is a celebration of different cultures and holidays, using Balletic, Modern, Theatrical, and Folk Dance styles to celebrate the December holidays of Christmas, Kwanzaa, Hanukah, and the Winter Solstice, and featuring glorious holiday music from traditional Christmas Carols to classical sounds such as Pachelbel’s Cannon in D Major, Handel’s Water Music, and even excerpts from the Nutcracker.The performance features the Kennedy Dancers Repertory Company (professional), The Kennedy Dancers Inner City Youth Pre-Professional Co., and guest companies Buggé Ballet, directed by Nicole Buggé , and Dance Designs, directed by Carol Baskinger. The Inner City Youth Pre-Professional Co. is a scholarship program for disadvantage teens who exhibit talent and the passion to be professional dancers.This collaboration will be an experience families will not want to miss, especially watching from inside this Jersey City Landmark. Come and support these iconic dance companies.last_img read more

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News story: Qualifications perception survey – latest results released

first_imgOfqual has today (4 April 2019) published Wave 17 of the annual qualifications perceptions survey. This information, published annually as Official Statistics, was carried out by the research organisation YouGov on our behalf. These regular survey outputs allow us to understand changes and variations of levels of understanding about qualifications among learners, parents, business groups, teachers, headteachers and the general public.Some highlights from this year’s survey:GCSEs, AS and A levels Overall confidence in GCSEs, AS and A levels was similar to wave 16 (conducted in late 2017). Seven in ten (71%) stakeholders agreed that GCSEs ‘are a trusted qualification’, comparable with waves 16 and 15 (conducted in late 2016). The proportion who said that ‘GCSE standards are maintained year on year’ was unchanged from the previous two waves (40%). 8 in 10 (81%) stakeholders said that AS and A levels ‘are a trusted qualification’, the same as in wave 16. Half of respondents (49%) said that ‘AS and A level standards are maintained year on year’, consistent with the previous two waves. Overall, levels of agreement that GCSE, AS and A level ‘marking is accurate’ were consistent with waves 16 and 15. GCSE 9 to 1 grading There has been an increase year-on-year since wave 14 (conducted in early 2016) in the proportion of stakeholders overall who correctly identified that 9 is the best grade GCSE students can get. In particular in this wave, the proportion of parents who correctly identified that 9 is the best grade rose to 85%, from 73% in wave 16. Seven in ten (69%) employers also correctly identified that grade 9 was the best grade, compared with 64% in wave 16. We asked about the 9-9 to 1-1 grading scale for the new GCSE combined science for the first time this wave. Nearly nine in ten (88%) headteachers said they were aware of the new scale. We are pleased to see improvement in the proportion of teachers reporting knowledge of the system for reviews of marking, moderation and appeals for GCSEs, AS and A levels, and also in those reporting that the system is fair. We believe these outcomes reflect the important changes to our rules that we introduced in summer 2017, and our collective work with exam boards to engage and inform schools and colleges. We also welcome the further improvement seen in levels of understanding of the new 9 to 1 GCSE grading scale among parents and employers. We focused our communication effort over the past year on raising awareness in schools and colleges of the 9-9 to 1-1 grading scale for the new GCSE combined science. Today’s results indicate good progress had been made by the time this survey was conducted in late 2018, and we are doing more on this front ahead of this year’s exams. Other results in this wave show general stability in levels of trust, perceived marking accuracy, and maintenance of standards across GCSEs, AS and A levels. We recognise the importance of public confidence in these qualifications. To that end, we are delivering a broad range of communications this year, including work to reduce incidents of malpractice in exams, to support students in their exam preparation, and to explain further how we maintain standards in these qualifications. Applied Generals Questions about Applied Generals were asked for just the second time in wave 17. Outcomes were consistent with wave 16. Review of marking, moderation and appeals Overall, two thirds (64%) of respondents knew that there was a review of marking, moderation and appeals system for GCSEs, AS and A levels, up from 42% in wave 16. More than nine in ten (94%) headteachers and eight in ten (83%) teachers knew, up from 78% and 58% in wave 16 respectively. There were also increases in the proportions of teachers who said the systems for GCSEs and A levels were fair. The proportion who said the system for GCSEs was fair rose to 50% in wave 17, from 38% in wave 16. The proportion who said the system for A levels was fair rose to 49%, from 39%. Special consideration, reasonable adjustments and malpractice Three quarters (77%) of teachers and headteachers said they had ‘adequate information’ about arrangements for students eligible for special consideration. Nearly seven in ten (67%) said they had ‘adequate information’ about reasonable adjustments. Both outturns were consistent with wave 16. The vast majority (86%) of teachers and headteachers said they had ‘adequate information’ about what constitutes malpractice for GCSEs, AS and A levels, and to whom they should report such incidents (88%). Both outturns were consistent with wave 16. Commenting on today’s release, Dr Michelle Meadows, Deputy Chief Regulator, said:last_img read more

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COVID vaccine race leaders likely won’t be only ones to reap huge payday

first_img The Daily Gazette Sign up for daily emails to get the latest Harvard news. Pfizer and Moderna appear to be the clear leaders in the race for a COVID-19 vaccine. Pfizer has already begun distribution, and Moderna’s entry is on the brink of FDA approval, which would put the two at least weeks ahead of their rivals. But will this head start translate to market share and additional profits? The Gazette spoke with Aaron Kesselheim, professor of medicine at Harvard Medical School and at Brigham and Women’s Hospital, where he leads the Program on Regulation, Therapeutics, and Law. Kesselheim said it wasn’t clear how much of a competitive advantage the lead will yield, but the potential for vaccine companies to make money is real.Q&AAaron KesselheimGAZETTE: We’ve been hearing “Pfizer,” “Pfizer,” “Pfizer” for the last couple of weeks, with a little bit of “Moderna” thrown in there. How important, from a business standpoint, do you expect it to be for a vaccine maker to be first out the gate?KESSELHEIM: I don’t think it’s a very big advantage because part of U.S. taxpayers’ massive investment in the development of these vaccines was advanced market commitments in which the government guaranteed purchase of the vaccine at a certain price. Getting anything out of the gate, of course, is a big deal for public health, but whether one particular manufacturer is a week or a month ahead of another is not, because they’re not selling them on the market. They’re just fulfilling orders that have already been sold.GAZETTE: So is it better to think of the vaccine not like a new product coming to market where there’s a big splash and you need to get people to buy it, but rather more like a government purchase, like buying a rocket for NASA or a new tank?KESSELHEIM: I agree with that. Obviously, still, there’s going to be a big push to make sure the vaccine is distributed appropriately and that people feel motivated to take it. But the initial purchase of the vaccine is already taken care of.GAZETTE: How hard is it for a pharmaceutical company to make money on vaccines? With a good vaccine, you give somebody a shot once and then they’re not your customer anymore. When I think about a product, a good vaccine has the opposite characteristics from something like a statin that you take every morning and will probably for decades.KESSELHEIM: Actually, the No. 1 product that brings in sales for Pfizer is a pneumonia vaccine. It made Pfizer $5.8 billion in international revenue in 2019. There was a lot of public investment early in the development of pneumonia vaccines, and Pfizer’s has been on the market for many years. So the reality is that companies can make a lot of money off of vaccines. Certainly, Pfizer and other companies made a lot of money on brand-name statins for a long time, but at some point, statins went generic and now are extremely cheap. Vaccines don’t really go generic, in part because they are more complex products and require more specialized manufacturing facilities, so a pharmaceutical company can expect revenues for many, many years selling a successful vaccine.GAZETTE: Does that dynamic hold true with all vaccines? What about the difference between something like a pneumonia vaccine, which is not given universally, versus a childhood vaccine, like measles, that everyone gets when they’re a kid? Or won’t it make a difference, from a business standpoint?KESSELHEIM: The prospect for profitmaking on the coronavirus vaccines is through the roof. You can see that in how the financial markets have responded to companies like Moderna or Pfizer when they issued press releases about their vaccines for coronavirus in development. That was guaranteed when the government invested billions of taxpayer dollars in the development of these products without requiring reasonable prices or any royalties from the profits for the products after they were sold. I read somebody suggested that Pfizer and Moderna could make $32 billion off coronavirus vaccines in 2021 alone. So I think the companies are poised to make substantial profits off of these products.GAZETTE: Initially, those profits will come from these pre-purchase agreements. But after that, do you expect the regular health insurance, health care financing system to take over?KESSELHEIM: I expect that, after the virus becomes more like an endemic virus, hopefully by late 2021, as a result of the vaccine and public health measures under the Biden administration, that the coronavirus vaccine will be available much more like other vaccines, like the influenza vaccine and pneumonia vaccine or shingles vaccine and become part of the normal market in which vaccines are sold for high prices by their manufacturers. Most of those vaccine prices are absorbed by private insurance companies or public insurers like Medicaid. Most people don’t pay a lot out-of-pocket for those vaccines, but rather the prices for the vaccines are built into the cost of insurance through people’s premiums.GAZETTE: When the government bought 100 million doses of Pfizer and the same of Moderna, did it do that to spur them to engage in expensive R&D without the risk of losing that investment?KESSELHEIM: The “expensive R&D” is not exactly right in this circumstance. The clinical trials certainly cost a lot of money, but the technology of the mRNA vaccine had already been developed and discovered, largely with public funding. BioNTech, the company that Pfizer partnered with that had the technology for an mRNA vaccine available, got large amounts of funding from the German government. So there certainly has been a lot of private investment in research and development in the last nine months, but that was dwarfed by the public investment leading up to that time and that has also occurred during the pandemic. Furthermore, the private investment was done with extremely limited risk, because of arrangements like advanced market commitments on the back end.GAZETTE: Do you expect the government to keep purchasing vaccines until all Americans are vaccinated or do you expect them to run through what they’ve already done and then it’ll go to the insurance companies?KESSELHEIM: I don’t know that that’s known yet. There are basically two different mechanisms through which vaccines — outside of a pandemic — are made available to Americans. There’s private insurance through which vaccines — like the pneumonia vaccine or the shingles vaccine — are made available. Then there’s the mechanism through which routine childhood vaccines are made available, which is usually because the government serves as the main purchaser and then distributes them.I don’t know in which direction coronavirus vaccines are going to move. I think that’ll depend on a lot of things we don’t know right now, such as how long coronavirus vaccine immunity lasts and whether, after people’s initial one to two doses, they’ll need additional vaccinations.Another pathway would be for the government to continue to be involved in setting the market for those products. And in that case, I would hope that the price that the government pays is a fair price that covers the cost of development and provides reasonable additional profit, but not the same kind of monopoly prices characteristic of the pneumonia vaccine or shingles vaccine.GAZETTE: How does this play out internationally? This must be the biggest market in history, since we’re talking about everyone. Do you see it being similar to the pattern here in the U.S. or is it dramatically different?KESSELHEIM: It is a little bit different because a lot of other countries have public health systems with drug and vaccine purchasing systems in place that are organized at the government level. In addition, large international organizations like Gavi (formerly, the Global Alliance for Vaccines and Immunization) and CEPI (Coalition for Epidemic Preparedness Innovation) have been organized to help facilitate vaccine purchases for low-income countries in South America or Africa or Asia. Coronavirus vaccine purchasing will go through those organizations, and I think it will be better organized, with a lot more pressure to ensure a fair price, than in the United States, because we don’t have those systems in place.GAZETTE: Will that also ensure that there are multiple players in the international market, that it’s not like a Coca-Cola that can come in and undercut its rivals for a little while and gain market share? KESSELHEIM: I think that it depends on the extent to which this technology is scalable and manufacturers around the world are able to use the technology. If it is the case that the technology is portable, then I would expect to see other countries start to develop their own manufacturing facilities for these products.GAZETTE: Is this something new? It seems like over the last several decades, innovation in pharmaceuticals of all kinds have come from the U.S. and other industrialized nations. Are we at a point where technology has simplified things to the point that pharmaceutical innovation is spreading more equally around the world?KESSELHEIM: I certainly hope that happens, because that will make important new treatments and vaccines more readily available to people around the world who need them. A lot of innovation has come from high-income nations in recent years. And I think one of the big challenges that we’ve had as an international society is ensuring that poor people have appropriate access to the same life-saving treatments that we have in higher-income countries. Reducing such disparities has been a big goal of the World Health Organization and groups like that. So, if the coronavirus vaccine helps move that process forward, if that is one positive that comes out of this, then that would certainly be a silver lining to this horrible pandemic.Interview was edited for clarity and length.last_img read more