Blog Archive

0

Missing Iowa jogger’s brothers speak out, FBI joins search

first_imgPoweshiek County Sheriffs Office(BROOKLYN, Iowa) — It’s been one week since 20-year-old Mollie Tibbetts mysteriously vanished in her rural Iowa town.Tibbetts went for a jog the evening of July 18 in her rural town of Brooklyn, Iowa, and never returned. She was reported missing the next day.Her brother, Scott Tibbetts, said he believes his sister is “fighting her best to get back home.”“I think the best thing, personally, to hang onto hope is … she’s a better fighter than anyone I know. So whatever situation she’s in, it’s not like she’s going to sit there and give up,” Scott Tibbetts told ABC News Tuesday. “It’s been a whirlwind. We’ve gone from sad to worried to just anxious and clueless. Up at 5 in the morning looking for her in every field, every ditch, every creek.”Another brother, Scott Tibbetts, added, “She’s incredibly kind and sweet. She has her life all planned out better than a lot of people do. And she’s ready to go into the world.”Mitch Mortvedt, assistant director of field operations for the Iowa Division of Criminal Investigations, told ABC News his agency and the FBI are now involved in the investigation.“For a 20-year-old to go missing and completely kind of fall off the grid as far as social media, cellphone, banking activity, that kind of thing, it’s obviously a very suspicious and very serious matter,” Mortvedt said.“She was kind of a creature of habit,” Mortvedt said of the missing college student. “And about the same time every evening she’d go for a run during daylight hours — well before dusk or dark, and she was seen Wednesday evening on one of her normal routes.”In this close-knit farming community of about 1,500 people, everyone knows everyone, Poweshiek County Sheriff Thomas Kriegel told ABC News. But the rural area makes the search difficult.“We’re surrounded by farm ground — corn and soy beans. Right now the corn is probably eight, nine feet tall. The only way you can search it is basically walk down every other row,” he said. “It’s difficult. Even the planes flying over have a difficulty looking down in the corn rows.”“This is a small town, rural Iowa, middle of the heartland — this isn’t supposed to happen here.”The FBI brought in “a highly-trained search and rescue team and they are going back over some of the areas for any type of forensic evidence or information or details that may have been inadvertently missed initially,” Mortvedt said.Authorities are also conducting follow-up interviews, Mortvedt said, because “as you think about things you may remember something later on that you didn’t remember initially.”“A lot of people get caught up in the emotion,” he explained. “This is a small town, rural Iowa, middle of the heartland — this isn’t supposed to happen here. And so as it’s starting to sink in to people that this happened in their backyards, you know, some people are remembering additional information.”Laura Calderwood, Mollie Tibbetts’ mother, told ABC News Monday there are “no words to describe how you feel when you don’t know where or how your child is,” calling it “excruciating.”“As that date gets closer, it’s like closing in on me.”She said her daughter was looking forward to her upcoming sophomore year at the University of Iowa, and she and her boyfriend, 20-year-old Dalton Jack, were weeks away from a Caribbean getaway.“She and her boyfriend Dalton were getting ready to go to the Dominican Republic on Aug. 2 to attend Dalton’s brother’s wedding,” Calderwood said. “As that date gets closer, it’s like closing in on me, because I’m thinking about these two people that are getting married that were also really close to Mollie. [It’s] supposed to be the happiest day of their life.”Jack told ABC News Monday that he last saw his girlfriend on July 16. The next day, he went to Dubuque for his job at a construction company.He said his girlfriend stayed at his house alone and watched his dogs. Going for an evening run, he said, was her regular routine.“She probably has on her Fitbit because she never takes it off. She uses it for the sleep tracker and for all her runs,” he explained. “She probably has her cell hone, but it’s either off or dead and we’ve tried calling it obviously and it goes straight to voicemail.”The couple, who met in high school, has been together for more than two years.“She is kind, sweet, caring, she’ll do anything for everybody,” Jack said.Mollie Tibbetts’ boyfriend and brothers are not suspects, Sheriff Kriegel told ABC News Wednesday.Kriegel said investigators are receiving hundreds of tips per day. Anyone with information is urged to call the Poweshiek County Sheriff’s Office at 641-623-5679.Copyright © 2018, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

0

Nanoplastics affect moulting and faecal pellet sinking in Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) juveniles

first_imgPlastic debris has been identified as a potential threat to Antarctic marine ecosystems, however, the impact of nanoplastics (<1 μm) is currently unexplored. Antarctic krill (Euphausia superba) is a keystone species of Southern Ocean pelagic ecosystems, which plays a central role in the Antarctic food webs and carbon (C) cycle. Krill has been shown to rapidly fragment microplastic beads through the digestive system, releasing nanoplastics with unknown toxicological effects. Here we exposed krill juveniles to carboxylic (COOH, anionic) and amino- (NH2, cationic) polystyrene nanoparticles (PS NPs) and we investigated lethal and sub-lethal endpoints after 48 h. The analysis of PS NP suspensions in Antarctic sea water (SW) media showed that PS-COOH formed large agglomerates (1043 ± 121 nm), while PS-NH2 kept their nominal size (56.8 ± 3 nm) during the exposure time. After 48 h, no mortality was found but increase in exuviae production (12.6 ± 1.3%) and reduced swimming activity were observed in juveniles exposed to PS-NH2. The microbial community composition in SW supports the release of krill moults upon PS NP exposure and stimulates further research on the pivotal role of krill in shaping Southern Ocean bacterial assemblages. The presence of fluorescent signal in krill faecal pellets (FPs) confirmed the waterborne ingestion and egestion of PS-COOH at 48 h of exposure. Changes in FP structure and properties were also associated to the incorporation of PS NPs regardless of their surface charge. The effects of PS NPs on krill FP properties were compared to Control 0 h as a reference for full FPs (plastic vs food) and Control 48 h as a reference for more empty-like FPs (plastic vs lack of food). Exposure to PS NPs led to a FP sinking rate comparable to Control 48 h, but significantly lower than Control 0 h (58.40 ± 23.60 m/d and 51.23 ± 28.60 m/d for PS-COOH and PS-NH2; 168.80 ± 74.58 m/d for Control 0 h). Considering the important role played by krill in the food web and C export in the Southern Ocean, the present study provides cues about the potential impact of nanoplastics on Antarctic pelagic ecosystems and their biogeochemical cycles.last_img read more

0

SLP Adjunct Clinical Supervisor – College of Education and Professional Studies

first_imgPosition Overview:Note: Adjunct positions at UCO are part-time teaching positions.This posting is to create a pool of interested applicants fromwhich the Department may draw as sections become open at any pointin the current academic year. This posting may or may not result inthe hiring of adjuncts. Adjunct Faculty – provides a qualitylearning experience for students on a semester basis. Adjunctfaculty reports to a dean or chair and performs instruction-relatedduties and responsibilities in a timely manner and in accordancewith the mission, policies and procedures of the college. Therelationship of the adjunct faculty member to the student is one ofteacher and facilitator of learning.College/Department Overview:The College of Education and Professional Studies currently has 100full-time and over 100 part-time faculty organized in sevendepartments. The college offers 23 undergraduate majors and 28graduate majors. All teacher education programs are CAEPaccredited. Other programs are recognized at the state and nationallevels with accreditations by the American College of SportsMedicine (ACSM), the American Dietetic Association (ADA), theAmerican Speech-Language Hearing Association (ASHA), the NationalAssociation for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC), theNational Council on Family Relations (NCFR), and the OklahomaEducational Quality and Accountability Commission (OEQA). UCO’sCollege of Education and Professional Studies has an enrollment ofnearly 4,800 students, about one-fourth of whom are graduatestudents. For further information see our website athttp://www.uco.edu/cepsDepartment Specific Essential Job Functions:SLP Adjunct Clinical Supervisors provide oversight ofspeech-language clinical service provision by student clinicians.The Clinical Supervisor will guide the student clinician inproviding evidence-based treatment, effective clinical practice,signing completed treatment documentation such as responserecording, semester and daily plans, reports, and summaries, aswell as, providing clinician feedback and evaluation.The SLP Adjunct Clinical Supervisor will instruct, counsel, andguide the student clinician in evidence-based treatment. TheSupervisor is responsible for meeting with assigned studentsthroughout the semester and maintaining office hours.QualificationsExperience Required:Possesses a master’s degree in Speech-Language Pathology orCommunication Sciences and Disorders. Must have a minimum oftwo-years of post CFY experience in SLP therapy provision andpossess a current ASHA certification of clinical competency (CCC)and an Oklahoma state license.Possesses excellent communication, problem-solving, andorganizational skills.Experience Preferred:Clinical mentoring or supervision experience.Knowledge/Skills/Abilities:SLP Adjunct Clinical Supervisor positions at UCO are part-time,clinical teaching/mentoring/supervising positions.Communication skills.Organization skills.Physical Demands:Repetitive movement of hands and fingers – typing and/or writing.Frequent standing, and/or sitting. Occasional walking, stooping,kneeling or crouching. Reach with hands and arms. Visuallyidentify, observe and assess. Ability to communicate withsupervisor/students/colleagues. Regular physical attendancerequired. The physical demands and work environment characteristicsdescribed here are representative of those that must be met by anemployee to successfully perform the essential functions of thisjob. Reasonable accommodations (in accordance with ADArequirements) may be made, upon request, to enable individuals withdisabilities to perform essential functions.last_img read more

0

AG Hill: No criminal charges for the late Dr. Ulrich Klopfer, regarding uncovered remains

first_img Google+ Pinterest Pinterest AG Hill: No criminal charges for the late Dr. Ulrich Klopfer, regarding uncovered remains WhatsApp Google+ Facebook Dr. Ulrich George Klopfer (Photo/ABC57) Though the name of Dr. Ulrich Klopfer may live on in infamy, he is dead and cannot be charged with improperly disposing of over 2,400 fetuses that were found on his properties.That conclusion came from Indiana Attorney General Curtis Hill, who ended his investigation.Klopfer ran clinics in South Bend, Fort Wayne and Gary, where he performed abortions since 1979.When he died in 2019, his family discovered over 2,000 fetuses in styrofoam coolers and in medical waste bags on his property, in a garage next to his home in Illinois.The fetuses, in various states of decay, had come from his practices in Indiana.Investigators were able to determine that the 2,411 fetuses were preserved from about 2000 to 2003. But, they still don’t know why. Previous articleHolcomb extends restrictions into late January, lifts pause on hospital elective proceduresNext articleWorking up a new two-year budget one of the challenges ahead for Hoosier lawmakers Jon ZimneyJon Zimney is the News and Programming Director for News/Talk 95.3 Michiana’s News Channel and host of the Fries With That podcast. Follow him on Twitter @jzimney. Twitter IndianaLocalNews Facebook By Jon Zimney – December 30, 2020 2 234 WhatsApp Twitterlast_img read more

0

Unilever and Coke veteran Joanna Allen to lead Graze

first_imgFormer Unilever beauty and personal care boss Joanna Allen has been named chief executive of snacking brand Graze.The appointment follows last year’s acquisition of Graze by Unilever which, at the time of the deal, said it planned to use Graze’s tech and e-commerce expertise for its wider portfolio.Allen was most recently global brand vice president of Rexona deodorant, which is known as Sure in the UK. She was previously global brand vice president for Unilever-owned Hellmann’s.Before joining Unilever in 2015, she worked for The Coca-Cola Company for nine years, where she held senior roles, including global brand director for Coca-Cola.Anthony Fletcher, who has led Graze for almost eight years after joining the business as marketing head in 2009, is leaving to business to pursue opportunities with start-ups and early-stage businesses.“Graze has achieved so much over the past 11 years,” he said. “But I truly believe that the best is yet to come as it continues to drive behind purpose, the role of technology in helping FMCG businesses serve their customer and consumers better, and with a great addition to the team in Joanna.”Unilever general manager Sebastian Munden thanked Fletcher for his “tremendous energy, knowledge and commitment”.“I completely understand that Anthony’s passion lies with start-ups and earlier-stage businesses, and I wish him luck as he pursues these opportunities in the future. I hope this may mean we can work together again.“He has left a fantastic business in the capable hands of Joanna Allen, whom I know will build on Anthony’s legacy of innovating, being purpose-led and using cutting-edge technology to get healthier snacks to consumers.”Graze was founded in the UK in 2008 by developers and logistics experts and now employs more than 500 people. Originally delivered direct to consumers, the brand expanded into retail in the UK in 2015 and in the US in 2016.last_img read more

0

Watch Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, Warren Haynes Perform At The White House

first_imgYou’re doing something right when you’re invited to play at the White House. As part of the “Red, White, and Blues” night, President Obama and PBS hosted performances from Troy “Trombone Shorty” Andrews, Jeff Beck, Gary Clark, Jr., Shemekia Copeland, Buddy Guy, Mick Jagger, B.B. King, Keb Mo, and more to celebrate 2012’s Black History Month. A stand-out performance from the night features Susan Tedeschi, Derek Trucks, and Warren Haynes doing a stunning rendition of “I’d Rather Go Blind” by Etta James, alongside the White House band featuring Booker T Jones, who acted as bandleader for the night’s series.The three musicians complement one another incredibly in this blues number, as Tedeschi and Haynes exchange vocal harmonies and Trucks showcases his effortless slide-guitar playing – smiles, and goosebumps, all around.Also, check out Trombone Shorty performing “St. James Infirmary” in The White House’s East Wing:last_img read more

0

Weekend Pick: Take a Dip at Riprap Hollow

first_imgIt has been sweltering this week in the Virginias. The kind of heat that always surprises you when you step out of your air conditioning and onto the street, even though you have only been in that house/store/gas station for five minutes. The kind of heat that hooks up with humidity to produce an atmosphere you can feel on your skin and carries a weight that slumps the shoulders. This is typical of peak summer in the mid-Atlantic, but that does not make it any easier to handle on a day-to-day basis, especially for the desk jockeys sweating it out over morning coffee following their commute. No time for gossip at the water cooler these days, just chugging.Summer heat has a way of making everyone feel claustrophobic, trapped by the walls of oppression with no escape. Well, this weekend is the time to fight back and head for the blue lines of the mountains. This weekend is the perfect time to hit your favorite Blue Ridge swimming hole.One of our favorites is off of Skyline Drive in Shenandoah National Park: Riprap Hollow. This is an excursion that combines all the best aspects of SNP. You can do this hike as an out and back or make it a 10-mile loop by linking up the Riprap Trail and the Wildcat Ridge Trail with the Appalachian Trail. After setting out from the Riprap Trail Parking area, you will be rewarded with stunning vistas from Calvary Rocks and Chimney Rocks before heading down from the ridge to the ice-cold stream flowing out of the mountains.Views, swimming holes, Appalachian Trail, waterfalls? Sounds like the perfect day to us.Directions to Riprap Hollow:Park at the Riprap Trail parking area, at milepost 90 along Skyline Drive. Take the A.T. for half a mile to the blue blazed Riprap Trail, then follow the trail for three miles as it drops in elevation. Here is a map (PDF) from Shenandoah National Park.View Larger Maplast_img read more

0

Amendments proposed to Great Smoky Mountains and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians sochan agreement

first_imgA federal court has temporarily blocked a law passed in Arkansas earlier this year banning plant-based food from using the name “burgers” and other meat-related terminology like “sausages.” In recent years, plant-based meat substitutes have become a billion dollar industry, causing concern to traditional livestock industries. The lawsuit, filed by the state, claimed that labeling plant-based products with meat-related names would confuse consumers. United States District Judge Kristine G. Baker ruled in favor of the ACLU and Tofurky. In her ruling, Judge Baker stated that, “the state appears to believe that the simple use of the word ‘burger,’ ‘ham,’ or ‘sausage’ leaves the typical consumer confused, but such a position requires the assumption that a reasonable consumer will disregard all other words found on the label.” Grantees will be selected based on their potential to collect the most cans and bottles for recycling as well as other considerations such as creating new or expanding access to recycling in a community and providing access in environmentally sensitive areas. To learn more about the grant visit their toolkit. Veggie burgers can still be called “burgers” in Arkansas Great Smoky Mountains National Park is seeking public comment on amendments and additions to the agreement formed last year between the park and the Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians, allowing the Cherokee to harvest sochan from their ancestral lands that are within the park. Three amendments to improve the agreement are proposed. They would allow permitted tribal members the choice to gather a portion of the sochan leaf or whole sochan leaves; clarify text related to gathering activities near visitor centers, trailheads, campgrounds and picnic areas; and establish a sochan research area that would be off limits to gathering. Public comments will be collected through January 12.  Keep America Beautiful public recycling bin grants available The Coca-Cola Foundation and nonprofit organization Keep America Beautiful have announced that the application period for the 2020 Keep American Beautiful/Coca-Cola Public Spaces Recycling Bin Grant Program is open through December 31. In 2019, recycling bins were distributed to 31 organizations including government agencies, colleges and universities, and Native American tribal locations. Amendments proposed to Great Smoky Mountains and Eastern Band of Cherokee Indians sochan agreementlast_img read more

0

CFCU launches mobile discount program called Community CA$H

first_img 3SHARESShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr,Andrew Bank Andrew Bank is Co-Founder of Larky, a mobile loyalty platform that drives acquisition, retention, wallet share, and interchange revenue. Andrew is responsible for client relationships, marketing, and thinking about how … Web: www.larky.com Details CFCU’s Marketing Manager, Rebekah Monroe, talks about the implementation process and member & staff responseLarky sat down to chat with Rebekah Monroe, Marketing Manager of Christian Financial Credit Union (CFCU), about the launch of Community CA$H, their branded version of Larky’s mobile discount platform. With assets of $323 million, CFCU has seven branches around Roseville, Michigan. CFCU rolled out its member loyalty program (including a mobile loyalty app and website) to its 40,000 members during the last week of November 2014.Q: Why did you feel that a member loyalty program was important for CFCU?A: Competition is fierce for our members’ wallet share. We knew that in order to gain and maintain top-of-wallet status with our membership, we needed to do something to build more loyalty in our credit and debit card products.Q: Why was CFCU interested in a mobile discount program like Larky?A: Our CEO, Patty Campbell, is a very forward thinking leader.  She sits on Filene’s Research Council, and she’s always pushing us to be on the forefront of innovation and technology. When she met the founders of Larky, Andrew Bank and Gregg Hammerman, Patty was intrigued.  Then when Larky became part of the Filene Impact Pilot for 2014, she knew CFCU needed to take the lead to be one of the first to launch the Larky platform.Q: What are your top goals for the program?A: We would like to increase share of wallet and drive interchange revenue. Supporting local businesses (by offering local discounts) is a great side effect of the program.Q: Did Community CA$H replace a rewards program CFCU already had in place?A: Our members are entitled to some benefits through the Invest in America program and CashBack rewards through our credit card product, but we’ve never had anything like Larky’s program.Q: Why did you feel it necessary to go beyond your existing credit card points-based rewards?A: Our members like the CashBack rewards, but Larky allowed us the opportunity to do something different than our competitors. We can’t offer the breadth of rewards that big credit card companies and banks can offer, since we’re a smaller, local institution. But this can help us stand out and give us a competitive edge. Plus, the feel of the program is local, just like us. We’ve maintained a mantra for several years that “we’re main street, not wall street.” This helps us reinforce this brand.(The image above is an ATM screen graphic promoting the member discount program.)Q: Who was involved in decision-making and implementation? A: We brought together a team from our marketing and payments areas.  We also included business development as we wanted our small business members to participate in the program by offering discounts and perks to our members. It also shows our support for our small business members, since we’re sending them new customers.Q: Was compliance approval an obstacle?A: No, not at all. Since the transactions in Community CA$H happen outside our institution, there is no information shared between us and the merchants.  Members are using our credit/debit cards for which they have already received the necessary disclosures. There is no member data that is stored by Larky, so we didn’t have to worry too much about compliance issues.Q: Where did the name Community CA$H come from?A: Our goal with the name was to reflect CFCU’s image, as a community supporter and advocate for small business, plus we wanted to add a little of Larky’s fun spirit to the program. The marketing team came up with some initial names, but none of them quite hit the mark, so we decided to ask all of our employees for ideas. In fact, we made it into a friendly competition, and a prize was awarded to the winner – we love “Community CA$H.”Q: How did you get staff buy in? And how did you make sure they knew how to use the program?A: We launched Community CA$H with our staff three weeks before we rolled it out to our members, so they were our test group.  First the Larky team came on-site to do a fun training session during a staff meeting. We also posted Community CA$H information on our intranet and added it to our new staff training process. During testing, our staff members found bugs, asked good questions, and made sure everything worked with participating merchants. Larky was great about fixing glitches and reworking things, so the program was easy and intuitive to use. The response was positive all along, which got the implementation team excited about rolling the program out to our members.We also provided a rewarding incentive to use the program with another staff contest.  When employees made a purchase at a local merchant in the Community CA$H program, they brought in their receipts as an “entry ticket.”  Each receipt entered them in a drawing to fully reimburse the amount of their purchase.(The image above is window sticker for participating merchants.)Q: Could you explain the launch process with your members?A: Sure. We promoted Community CA$H in all kinds of ways – including a video, signage in our branches, and in emails to our members.A local vendor helped us create an instructional video. Initially, that video was a pop-up that users had to read when they visited our website to get rates, log in to Online Banking, or just browse. The video is still on our homepage and on our YouTube channel.Our team also developed clever signage for our branches.  We developed large wall graphics that resemble the inside of the app and a large cardboard cutout that explains what the app is and how to download it. Of course, because our staff has been using the program, they are comfortable discussing Community CA$H too. We also included information about Community CA$H and a link to the video in e-mails to all of our members. (Here’s a peek at the video.)Q: What metrics are you watching to gauge the return on your investment?A: Well, we just launched the program right before Thanksgiving, as a way to say “thank you” to our members and help them save money during their holiday shopping, so it’s pretty early to try to measure usage. Right now we’re tracking downloads of the app, hits on the microsite page, and comments in the app store.  Later this year we’ll do a study of our members to see how Community CA$H impacted card usage and loyalty.Q: One last question – what would you call the Larky mascot? A monster, a Yeti, a Bumble, or something else entirely?A: Hah, we refer to him as “The Little Yellow Larky Guy!”last_img read more

0

Why you should buy a share in shared branching & ATM networks

first_imgA credit union can use any shared branch or ATM in a network to satisfy the service facility requirement for adding a select group, provided the credit union is an owner in the shared branching or ATM network.  Therefore, an ownership interest in shared branching and ATM networks allows you to extend the service area that you can add select groups within. The NCUA typically considers a service facility’s service area to extend somewhere between 25 and 30 miles. So if you are trying to add a group outside of that range from your own network you could potentially leverage a network you have an ownership stake in to add the group. Which would allow you to add select groups that would otherwise be outside the service area of your own service network. ShareShareSharePrintMailGooglePinterestDiggRedditStumbleuponDeliciousBufferTumblr If your credit union is actively, or wants to be, adding new select groups, you should buy an ownership interests in any shared branching or ATM networks you participate in that will allow you to. The reason this matters is because of the NCUA’s definition of a qualifying service facility for adding select groups. The NCUA’s definition is:center_img continue reading »last_img read more