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US Air Force investigating intruder at Joint Base Andrews, home to Air Force One

first_imgMark Wilson/Getty ImagesBy MATT SEYLER and MORGAN WINSOR, ABC News(WASHINGTON) — The U.S. Air Force is investigating an incident of an intruder at Joint Base Andrews, a military facility in Maryland’s Prince George’s County that houses Air Force One, the aircraft that carries the president.“An unauthorized individual gained access to Joint Base Andrews. The incident is under investigation,” a Joint Base Andrews spokesperson told ABC News in a statement late Thursday. “The Air Force Office of Special Investigations (OSI) is lead on this investigation. Any requests for information related to the incident can be referred to OSI.”The OSI did not immediately respond to ABC News’ request for comment and additional details.It’s unclear when the incident occurred or whether the individual was able to reach any aircraft on the flight line.Joint Base Andrews is located about 14 miles southeast of Washington, D.C.U.S. President Joe Biden is expected to depart Joint Base Andrews on Friday evening en route to Wilmington, Delaware, according to a schedule released by the White House on Thursday night.“Technically, ‘Air Force One’ is used to designate any Air Force aircraft carrying the President, but it is now standard practice to use the term to refer to specific planes that are equipped to transport the Commander-in-Chief,” the White House states on its website. “Today, this name refers to one of two highly customized Boeing 747-200B series aircraft, which carry the tail codes 28000 and 29000. The Air Force designation for the aircraft is VC-25A.”Copyright © 2021, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

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Employers still fail at key skills

first_img Comments are closed. Employers who train their own staff do a better job overall than othertraining providers, according to the final report from the Training StandardsCouncil. Forty-six per cent of grades awarded to employers were “good” or”outstanding” and only 11 per cent were less than satisfactory. Thefigures compare with averages of 34 per cent and 18 per cent for other types ofprovider. Training and assessment in key skills, however, comes in for criticismacross the board. Evidence suggests that their neglect is a major factor inpoor completion rates of Modern Apprenticeship programmes. “Modern Apprenticeships will not fulfil their potential until keyskills become an integral part of the vocational learning process,” saidKeith Marshall, director of inspection (planning) for the TSC’s successor theAdult Learning Inspectorate. “Key skills cannot be taught effectively away from the workplace andout of context. All of the naturally occurring opportunities for extending andassessing them are lost. Distinct key skills assessment and record-keepingafter an NVQ level 3 is complete becomes a chore for everyone,” he said. Marshall points out that it is the job of Ali inspectors to highlightevidence that failure to integrate key skills is not serving the needs oflearners or employers. He added, “Many providers have successfully builtkey skills into the Modern Apprenticeship framework and there is much to belearnt from examples of good practice.” Nissan has done a lot of work matching up key skills to what apprentices do.But it is not always easy, said trainer Ian Green. “One of the difficulties is the language used in key skills. You haveto interpret it for your own industry and ask yourself, ‘How do we actually dothat?’ You must treat key skills as substantive so they aren’t just seen assomething apprentices have to do to get a tick in the box.” Key skills also have to be up to date with changes in the workplace and stayrelevant to employers’ needs, yet those setting the standards are oftendivorced from industry, Green said. According to Stuart Smith, apprentice training manager at engineering firmTRW, key skills should be scrapped as a requirement for craft apprentices. Hesaid, “It makes not a jot of difference to trainees’ ability to carry outthe skills we’re teaching them. We have a lad who’s struggling with key skillsat level 2. He’ll make a superb fitter, but he won’t get a certificate underthis system. It’s fine if you can integrate key skills, but if you can’t, youhave to teach them separately, which isolates them. And if they’re inherent inthe job, then why assess them?” By Elaine Essery Previous Article Next Article Employers still fail at key skillsOn 1 Sep 2001 in Personnel Today Related posts:No related photos.last_img read more

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The Antarctic ozone hole during 2008 and 2009

first_imgThe Antarctic ozone holes of 2008 and 2009 are reviewed from various perspectives, making use of a range of Australian data and analyses. In both years, ozone holes formed that were fairly typical of those observed since the late 1990s. The ozone hole of 2008 was somewhat larger than that of 2009. In 2009 the ozone hole developed more rapidly, but did not last as long as in 2008, particularlyin the lower stratosphere.last_img

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Lecturer – Computer Science – (ADJ000233)

first_imgThe Department of Computer Science at the University of Houstonoffers a broad range of undergraduate and graduate level coursesand is seeking part-time Lecturers beginning in the Fall semesterof 2018 to teach courses in the following areas: Arts andAnimation, Programming, Software Design and Engineering, ComputerNetworks and Computer Organization and Architecture. Interested andqualified candidates are invited to apply to be considered forthese temporary, part-time positions. Lecturer appointments aremade on a semester basis.The University of Houston is an ADVANCE institution, one of aselect group of universities in receipt of NSF funds in support ofour commitment to increase diversity and the participation andadvancement of women in STEM.The University of Houston is an equal opportunity/affirmativeaction employer. Minorities, women, veterans, and persons withdisabilities are encouraged.Qualifications :Computer Science seeks outstanding candidates who hold a graduatedegree in Computer Science, Computer Engineering, or a closelyrelated field. Preference will be given to candidates who havesignificant industry experience related to Computer Science andhave innovative ideas for lecture and laboratory instruction. Aproven teaching record at the university level is highlydesirable.Notes to Applicant: Official transcripts are required for afaculty appointment and will be requested upon selection of finalcandidate. All positions at the University of Houston are securitysensitive and will require a criminal history check.last_img read more

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TRITCAK, ANGIE

first_img82, of Whiting, passed away on December 15, 2017 at Monmouth Medical Center. Her family was at her bedside throughout this transition. Angie Sorrentino was born and raised in Bayonne. She graduated from Our Lady of the Assumption School and Bayonne High School and later took secretarial courses at Hudson County Community College. She worked at Maidenform in Bayonne and then at Western Electric in Kearny. There she met her future husband, Edward Tritcak. They were married for 47 years and raised 3 sons. He predeceased her in 2008. Some of Angie’s other employers were Fotomat (in Bayonne and Jersey City) and the Harborside Club (in Jersey City). After living in Bayonne for 63 years, Angie moved to Whiting in 1998. Angie was a parishioner at Our Lady of the Assumption Church in Bayonne and later at St. Elizabeth Ann Seton Church in Whiting. Angie’s parents, Vincent and Jennie Sorrentino, and her brothers Andrew and Vincent Sorrentino had predeceased her. Survivors include her sons, David (Jamila), Scott (Anne) and Todd (Rosita) as well as 4 grandchildren: Daniel, Ross, Lauren and Angelica. A fifth grandchild is on the way. Also surviving are 3 nieces and 2 nephews. The family would like to thank the caring and expert staff at Monmouth Medical Center (South) as well as Father Marian of St. Mary of the Lake Church in Lakewood who kindly administered Last Rites. Funeral arrangements by DeGRAFF LAKEHURST Funeral Home, 119 Union Ave., Lakehurst, NJ.last_img read more

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L’Artisan plans larger premises

first_imgSpicers Bakery in Navan, Co Meath, Ireland, is to move its L’Artisan division to a new bakery at the end of January to meet increased demand.MD John Spicer founded the L’Artisan company three years ago to make and distribute artisan-style bread, confectionery and dessert products for caterers.The new bakery is on the large Mullaghboy industrial estate just outside Navan and will have 650 sq m of production space.L’Artisan currently employs around 25 people and is likely to add to those numbers.About half the staff are non-Irish, including 10 pastry bakers from France – French croissants are a speciality.The firm’s existing bakery in Navan is to be retained for traditional Irish breads.Spicers also has a retail outlet, Cooper’s Fine Foods, in the Navan shopping centre.last_img read more

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Briefs

first_imgn Starbucks’ US chairman and former chief executive, Howard Schultz will immediately replace chief executive Jim Donald. Starbucks said the leadership shuffle is part of a series of initiatives to help improve its performance.n What has been described as Britain’s first Polish supermarket has opened in Sunderland. The Polskie Food Company in Holmeside stocks a wide range of Polish bakery items and breads.n A new website, [http://www.foodanddrinkforum.co.uk], has been launched by The Food & Drink Forum. The aim is to help keep the industry up to date with support, training and development opportunities.n Bakers should consider capitalising on the growing trend for online shopping. Retail specialist, Actinic, found in a survey that respondents reported a 27% rise in the number of customers buying online at Christmas, compared to the same period in 2006. They also reported an increase in internet revenues of 46%.n Northern Foods announced on Friday 11 January, that its acquisition of a soup plant from Baxters Food Group would improve its production footprint in the UK.n Police have been investigating inapropriate, religious graffiti at Pentland Bakery in Herts. Pentland owner Mr Munir said the graffiti referred to Islam in an offensive way.last_img read more

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Briscoe wins ‘Nobel Prize of water’

first_imgA Harvard professor who has made a career of tackling water insecurity challenges around the world will receive the Stockholm Water Prize, known informally as the “Nobel Prize of water.”John Briscoe, visiting professor of environmental engineering at the Harvard School of Engineering and Applied Sciences (SEAS), was selected by the Stockholm International Water Institute (SIWI) to receive the award. An expert in water policy and development issues, Briscoe also holds appointments on the faculty of the Harvard School of Public Health and the Harvard Kennedy School.King Carl XVI Gustaf of Sweden, the patron of the prize, will present the award at a ceremony in Stockholm on Sept. 4. A link to the Stockholm Water Prize announcement including the full text of the citation and video interview can be found here.The Stockholm Water Prize, awarded annually since 1991, will be given to Briscoe for his “unparalleled contributions to global and local management of water — contributions covering vast thematic, geographic, and institutional environments — that have improved the lives and livelihoods of millions of people worldwide.” Citing Briscoe’s expertise as a researcher, policymaker, and hands-on practitioner of water policy management, SIWI lauded him for “providing the world with tools for peaceful, productive, and equitable management of the Earth’s water resources.”Briscoe received a Ph.D. in environmental engineering from Harvard in 1976. His subsequent career has borne the hallmarks of the iconic Harvard Water Program, deeply rooted in his discipline but able to work across a wide range of other disciplines, bring questions from practice to researchers, and put the findings of research into practice. Over three decades, Briscoe has worked on water issues in many countries and at many levels, from the village to the global. A native of South Africa, he has lived in the United States, Bangladesh, India, and Brazil, and worked in dozens of countries around the world.After 20 years in leadership and management positions at the World Bank, Briscoe returned to Harvard in 2009 as Gordon McKay Professor of the Practice of Environmental Engineering in the School of Engineering and Applied Sciences, with joint appointments in the School of Public Health and Kennedy School of Government. A teacher of popular undergraduate and graduate courses on water, he has been nominated for major teaching and mentoring awards. Briscoe has led groups of students from across the University in collaborative research on water management in the Colorado, Indus, Mississippi, Murray-Darling, and São Francisco basins.The Stockholm Water Prize honors individuals and organizations whose work contributes broadly to the conservation and protection of water resources and to improved well-being of the planet’s inhabitants and ecosystems.last_img read more

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Students aiding the environment

first_imgClimate change knows no borders. As temperatures and seas rise, ecosystems change, and extreme weather patterns affect communities around the globe, insights that help identify solutions to these challenges are being had in every corner of the world.Five undergraduate women from Harvard College spoke with the Gazette about how they spent the summer researching climate and ecological stresses in other countries and nearby. Each student exemplifies how, whether in the lab or in the field, members of the Harvard community are embracing multidisciplinary efforts to generate ways to address climate change and sustainable development.Tackling fisheries management in coastal MadagascarSabrina Devereaux ’18Environmental science and public policy concentrator, with a secondary in governmentDevereaux spent the summer exploring small-scale fisheries management in rural communities on the large island of Madagascar, off southeast Africa. She cites rising populations, evolving fishing techniques, and declining fishery numbers as stresses that have caused local governments to push for increased regulations on fishing. Devereaux sought to generate a better understanding of the new fishing rules and how they can result in problems for local fishermen, based on the way they are structured and implemented.Sabrina Devereaux ’18 (second from the right) interviews a local fisher, as children from the village look on, as part of her research project to identify issues within small-scale fisheries management in coastal Madagascar. Photo courtesy of Sabrina DevereauxShe hoped her research would fill information gaps and help explain why sustainable management is effectively executed in some villages but not in others. In preparation for her trip, Devereaux studied Malagasy with Harvard’s African Language Program, and while in Madagascar she conducted surveys with more than 90 fishermen in five coastal villages, with the help of an assistant.“Fisheries management fascinated me for the same reasons many other students and researchers seek to avoid it. Its issues are a combination of ecology, biology, law, politics, human geography, and economics. I applied to Harvard because it was one of the few schools in the country willing to take such an interdisciplinary approach to teaching environmental science. Concentrating in environmental science and public policy has allowed me to take courses in each of these disciplines, giving me the confidence to research a topic as multifaceted as fisheries.”Her experience:“My vision for the future of this project has been shaped by my interactions with local stakeholders. I’ll never forget speaking with one particular fisherman. He asked my assistant and me questions about the goals and implications of my research, and what I hoped to accomplish with their answers. He turned to me and spoke about how I was not the first person to do research in that village. Foreigners periodically came through the region to ask questions on various topics. But the results, he said, rarely came back to the village. He told me that the questions I asked were good, and that he gave me honest answers. He hoped, in return, that my research would help the village. His words have stayed with me, and will inspire every minute I invest in writing my final report.”Research funded by the Harvard University Center for the Environment Undergraduate Summer Research Fund, Planetary Health Alliance, and Harvard College Research Program.Developing a global database of clean energy projects in SwitzerlandMarissa Saenger ’19Electrical engineering concentratorSurrounded by the majestic peaks, clear water, and natural beauty of Switzerland, Saenger spent three months conducting research on decentralized, renewable energy systems. These systems employ energy produced closer to where it will be used than energy generated and distributed via a central plant. Working with ETH Zurich’s group for sustainability and technology, she reviewed the literature on strategies and applications for renewable energy generation, and developed and analyzed a global database of clean-energy projects.While researching renewable energy this summer in Switzerland, Marissa Saenger ’19 also found time to climb and cycle some of Europe’s most famous mountain passes, all on her 3-gear commuting bike. Photo courtesy of Marissa SaengerThe renewable projects Saenger researched ranged in scale from powering a single building to an entire island, and utilized a broad range of technologies for energy generation, conversion, and storage. She found that variations in terminology for these energy systems make it hard for the academic community to consolidate information and collaborate. Understanding these roadblocks and demonstrating the need to streamline information was one reason her internship was created.Her experience:“This research is important to me because it can ultimately be used to derive policy implications for how energy production can be further decarbonized using decentralized renewable resources. Decarbonizing energy production worldwide is critical to address climate change, and policy drivers for increased renewable energy use are proving very important to accomplishing this on a larger scale. My research experiences this summer helped me to envision more clearly what I want to do in the future, and provided a basis for further research or academic pursuits in the field of clean energy and climate innovation. I also had the opportunity to work with many bright people in my field of interest, from whom I have learned a lot and whom I am glad to have met.”Research funded by the ThinkSwiss Scholarship and the Harvard Office for Career Services.Quantifying sea ice loss in the Antarctic OceanMaya Chung ’19Earth and planetary sciences concentrator with a secondary in applied mathematicsPredicting future climate patterns based on observations in the vast and difficult-to-observe Antarctic Ocean may seem like a daunting first research project, but Chung was up for the challenge. She spent her summer working on the Southern Ocean Carbon and Climate Observations and Modeling project at the Scripps Institution of Oceanography at the University of California, San Diego, to help increase understanding of how the Antarctic responds to climate change.She was tasked with quantifying the amount of ice leaving the Ross Sea, which contains the largest ice shelf in Antarctica. She found that the location and strength of a recurring low-pressure weather system in West Antarctica called the Amundsen Sea Low directly correlated with the amount of sea ice lost there.Maya Chung ’19 used MatLab, a programming language, to analyze and visualize the amount of ice leaving the Ross Sea in Antarctica and the correlation of a low-pressure weather system. Photo courtesy of Maya ChungThough the Ross Ice Shelf is one of the only places in Antarctica where ice cover is increasing, likely due to the strong winds of the Amundsen Sea Low, researchers say the increased sea ice causes Antarctic sea ice to melt in the southeast Pacific Ocean. This addition of fresh water changes the characteristics of water masses that form in the region, which then travel slowly around the Earth, affecting weather and climate globally. Although strong winds alone cannot predict the amount of ice leaving a given area — ocean currents and ice thickness are also factors — this research suggests that the variability of the recurring pressure system may help explain how changes in the Ross Ice Shelf affect global ocean circulation and climate.Her experience:“This was my first major research experience, and I found it exciting to work independently and communicate my results to my peers. This experience also taught me that I am extremely fortunate to have access to Harvard’s faculty and resources. I hope to either continue sea ice research in relation to paleoclimatology or to pursue more interdisciplinary research, with a focus on climate’s impact on humans.”Research funded by the National Science Foundation, Summer Undergraduate Research Fellowship, Research Experiences for Undergraduates.Capturing carbon in the Harvard ForestMolly Leavens ’19Environmental science and public policy concentrator                                            Leavens is “stressed out about climate change,” but instead of spending her summer worrying, she channeled her energy into a climate research project at the Harvard Forest in rural Petersham, Mass. Leavens spent her time in the forest measuring trees, stumps, and logs to research regrowth rates of harvested and unharvested areas, to help understand how wood-generated heat and energy affects the amount of carbon in the atmosphere.Molly Leavens ’19 protects herself from sun and insects during a day in the Harvard Forest studying carbon capture. Photo courtesy of Molly LeavensThrough her measurements, Leavens was able to calculate how much carbon each area of the forest contained and how that amount is changing over time. Although this is only one piece of the wood-generated-energy puzzle, she found that wood energy can be sustainable when the wood is harvested from specific forest types and under specific management regimes. For example, in areas with only 25 percent of the trees removed, the remaining trees have less competition to grow and can recapture the removed carbon quickly.Her experience:“I am grateful for the opportunity to learn about and engage with my passion for sustainability this summer, and the Harvard Forest has certainly left a bigger impact on me than I left on it. I intend to continue the data analysis for this research throughout the upcoming academic year. I also hope these regrowth rates can supplement the growing literature body on wood-generated heat and energy and help citizens and policymakers better understand its climate-change implications. My work is one tiny step toward reshaping New England’s future energy supply and has equipped me with analytical skills I cannot wait to apply to even more environmental issues.”Funded by the Harvard Forest Summer Research Program in Ecology.What can microbes tell us about climate change?Amy Li ’20Environmental science and public policy concentrator and undergraduate resource efficiency program representative with the Office for SustainabilityLi spent her summer tackling an unfamiliar topic in an unfamiliar place. Working at the Hawaii Natural Energy Institute at the University of Hawaii at Manoa, she collaborated with a lab that is researching methane cycling in the context of climate change.She was tasked with examining the makeup of microbes, particularly whether they were methane consumers or producers, and how that makeup shifts when levels of the gas — one of the most potent greenhouse gases and a major contributor to global warming — are elevated. To accomplish this, she created a shallow water-column environment of rich sediment and brackish water, and diffused methane into the sediment bottom. Through periodic collection of samples and DNA sequencing, she found a shift in the microbial community and observed that the strong methane flux may have removed all the oxygen from the environment and depleted the methane consumers.Amy Li ’20 explores the Hoʻomaluhia Botanical Garden in O’ahu, Hawai’i during her summer internship with the Hawai’i Natural Energy Institute. Photo courtesy of Amy LiAs environmental destabilization from climate change continues to increase, there is a rising risk that deposits of frozen methane inside deep ocean sediments may melt, releasing huge quantities of methane into the atmosphere and water column. She hopes that her work examining these microbial communities and their response to such drastic methane fluxes will provide insights and spur further analysis.Her experience:“It was amazing to see how much could be accomplished over a summer. Throughout my experience, I encountered unexpected road bumps, which challenged me to rely on my creative side and be resourceful, reminding me that research often is not as straightforward as we may expect or hope. I also learned the power of forming long-lasting relationships with mentors, of collaboration, and of escaping one’s comfort zone.“Working on this project in Hawaii increased my awareness of the fragility of the Earth we inhabit. Living on a tiny island in the middle of a seemingly endless ocean is extremely humbling. The local community’s attitude toward environmentalism was also quite inspiring — solar panels adorning roofs, wind farms on the North Shore, and much respect for the ’aina (land). Every weekend was either spent at the beach or hiking or both, which left me that much closer to the natural environment and with an even greater appreciation for our planet.”Funded by the National Science Foundation, Research Experiences for Undergraduates.last_img read more

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Exclusive! Alex Timbers Talks Moulin Rouge! Development

first_img As previously announced, freaked out over and constantly dreamcast in the Broadway.com offices, Moulin Rouge! is officially getting the Great White Way treatment! Based on Baz Luhrmann’s resplendent 2001 film starring Ewan McGregor and Nicole Kidman, the in-the-works tuner already boasts Alex Timbers at the helm and Tony winner John Logan as its scribe. And apparently, we’re not the only ones caught up in the fandom.Hailed director Timbers, known for his work on cult fave Bloody Bloody Andrew Jackson, Peter and the Starcatcher, Rocky and this season’s Oh, Hello, exclusively told Broadway.com: “I’m really excited that John Logan is writing the book because he is fabulous writer. I’ve been a big fan of his movies and The Last Ship and so to get to work with him—it’s really an awesome moment.”In case you didn’t know (and if you don’t, go watch this instant!), Moulin Rouge! is set in the Montmartre Quarter of Paris, France and tells the story of a young poet/writer, Christian, who falls in love with the star of the Moulin Rouge, cabaret actress and courtesan Satine.As for the timeline for Moulin Rouge!’s highly-anticipated Broadway bow, Timbers told us: “We’re still in the early stages.”Come what may, we know this production is going to be spectacular, spectacular! Alex Timbers(Photo: Bruce Glikas) View Commentslast_img read more