Blog Archive

0

‘Massive’ investigation launched into shooting death of South Carolina postal worker

first_imgvmargineanu/iStock(ANDREWS, S.C.) — More than 70 federal, state and local authorities are now investigating the shooting death of United States Postal Service carrier Irene Pressley, who was shot to death in rural South Carolina.Pressley, 64, was “on route” delivering mail in Andrews, S.C., when she was shot and killed on Sept. 23. She had been with USPS for nearly 22 years.“We’re bringing the full force of law enforcement at all levels to bare in this massive investigation,” David M. McGinnis, inspector in charge of the Charlotte Division of the U.S. Postal Inspection Service, said during a press conference Friday. “Make no mistake; the perpetrators of this crime will face justice.”Neither the Williamsburg County Sheriff’s Office nor the U.S. Postal Inspector Service has announced a motive or a potential suspect.Without taking questions or elaborating on specifics, authorities repeatedly asked the public to share any information they may have about Pressley’s shooting.“In order for us to solve crimes, we can do a lot of technical things, but the one part that’s integral is from our community, you have to give us information to work with,” Williamsburg County Sheriff Stephen Gardner said during Friday’s press conference.Gardner said his deputies, along with assisting local agencies, are all on duty and pulling 12-hour shifts to bring this case to a close.“We wanted our citizens to know that they are safe,” he said.Authorities ask those with information about the case to contact the U.S. Postal Inspection Service at 1-877-876-2455 or call Crime Stoppers at 1-888-Crime-SC. The U.S. Postal Inspection Service said it’s offering a reward for information leading to an arrest.Copyright © 2019, ABC Radio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

0

Chicago children fight off carjacker who tried to steal family car

first_imgEvgen_Prozhyrko/iStock(CHICAGO) — A Chicago teenager said her survival instincts took over this week when she and her younger siblings fought off a carjacker who stole their family’s vehicle and allegedly threatened to shoot them if they refused to get out. “This dude just jumps in the car and he looks back and I realize it’s not my dad, so I go, ‘Who are you,’” 16-year-old Imama recalled in an interview with ABC’s Chicago station WLS-TV. “I was just scared for my life, I didn’t know what to do.” “And he starts driving really fast, going in like a zig-zag pattern,” Imama said. “I started yelling, I’m like ‘Who are you?’ And he goes, ‘Get out or I’m going to shoot you.’” The ordeal unfolded on Chicago’s north side at around 11:20 p.m. Sunday while Imama, her 10-year-old brother and their 5-year-old sister were waiting for their father to return from grabbing dinner. That’s when a male suspect allegedly jumped inside and sped off.“I was just scared for my life, I didn’t know what to do,” Imama said.“I was in panic mode, like, I wanted to cry but I knew I had to do something that can help,” she added. Imama and her brother, Hasnain, said they fought off the thief by pretending to comply with his demands. They said they attacked him from the backseat of the Toyota Highlander as soon as they saw a chance. “I said, ‘I’ll get out, fine,’ and then I started hitting him with the iPad,” Hasnain told WLS.“My phone was dead so I couldn’t call 911,” Imama added. “I see my dad’s phone in the passenger seat so I, like, try to strangle the dude from the back because I was right behind him.”She said she managed to dial 911 with her father’s phone while restraining the carjacker, who eventually jumped out of the vehicle and fled the scene. She said he got into a vehicle with multiple people inside. Police recovered the abandoned SUV a few blocks away from where it was stolen. Thankfully, the children were not injured and the Chicago Police Department said it has identified four suspects. The suspects — Steffy Lagunas, 19, Ralph Enriquez, 22, Kaily Lagunas, 19, and a 16-year-old boy — have each been charged with one misdemeanor count of criminal trespass to vehicles, according to the department.Copyright © 2019, ABC Audio. All rights reserved.last_img read more

0

Upcoming Military Antennas Summit to Reveal New Technologies and Products of Military RF Systems

first_imgBack to overview,Home naval-today Upcoming Military Antennas Summit to Reveal New Technologies and Products of Military RF Systems View post tag: military February 7, 2011 View post tag: technologies View post tag: Antennas View post tag: RF View post tag: New View post tag: News by topic View post tag: Summit View post tag: Reveal View post tag: Products The Institute for Defense & Government Advancement (IDGA (News – Alert)), a non-partisan information-based organization, has revealed that…[mappress]Source:tmcnet, Feb. 7, 2011; View post tag: Systems Share this article View post tag: upcoming View post tag: usa Upcoming Military Antennas Summit to Reveal New Technologies and Products of Military RF Systemslast_img read more

0

Bags of fun

first_imgA girl can never have too many bags. They are the ultimate fashion fix – cheap, versatile, practical (well, sometimes) and they don’t require endless trying-on sessions. A good bag can transform an ordinary outfit into a fabulous one. Buy a bag in any of this season’s key colours – canary yellow, apple green, and coral pink – and you will have found a more subtle and forgiving way of wearing such shades. Firstly, the evening bag or clutch bag: must be small enough not to hinder dancing/mingling but big enough to hold the essentials for a night out. If you’re wearing a plain outfit, choose a bag that will add interest: go to Accessorize for a sparkly/beaded/ colourful clutch. If your outfit is interesting enough in itself, you can’t go wrong with a classic black or neutral bag. Think about splashing out on a vintage designer classic like a Chanel quilted handbag. For everyday uses, you need a carry-all bag. Being an Oxford student, you will need to make sure this can fit at least one book in it but a fun, novelty bag can easily disguise dull contents. For summer, a beach bag is the perfect size for student essentials and they come in all sorts of colours and prints so it’s easy to find one no one else will have. Gap is reliable for this sort of bag (see top left), but if you want to splash out, Irish designer Orla Kiely is the undisputed expert for good-sized and quirky bags (see bottom right). The model carry-all bag, though, has to be the Mulberry Roxy bag (see bottom left), but at £575 you may need to search long and hard for a highstreet alternative. There are two types of bag that fall under the ‘weekend bag’ category. The first type is the one you use every weekend for shopping and general use – it needs to be slightly bigger than the evening bag, but you can forget about having to fit in books – relief. Neutral colours like brown, cream and black are practical choices for this sort of bag. The second weekend bag is the type you use when/if you’re lucky enough to go on a Bridget Jones-esque weekend get-away. All the designers like Louis Vuitton, Burberry, Mulberry and so on have perfect weekend choices but equally, the much more affordable Designers at Debenhams range have come up with some impressive alternatives. Of course, if you’re a true bag addict, this season alone you’ll need (or is it want?) the pastel bag, the metallic bag, the brightly coloured bag, the print bag, the sporty bag, the glam bag, the list goes on. And if you want to be streets ahead, for autumn/winter the must-have bag is Gucci satin patchwork bag (waiting lists will already be huge), and the bowling bag is back big time. For now though, invest in a cheap and cheerful summer bag and you’ll be surprised how much it can brighten up your mood.ARCHIVE: 3rd week TT 2004last_img read more

0

Finalists demand predicted grades safety net

first_imgWhen asked about Cambridge’s proposal, Otter-Sharp noted, “there would be an extraordinary disparity between the treatment of disadvantaged STEM students and of disadvantaged humanities students if Oxford were to copy the exact specifics of Cambridge’s safety net”.  “Without question these are extraordinary times, that are having unprecedented impact on the way we live. There are a lot of unknowns for us all, but the University is working hard to alleviate some of the stress and uncertainty that our students are feeling, and will provide more information to our community about Trinity term teaching and exams in the next few days as the situation becomes clearer.” Unlike in Cambridge, where all students take exams in first and second year, humanities students in Oxford generally do not sit exams in second year.  This comes as Cambridge announced today that they will be cancelling exams for first and second years, and offering finalists their classification from their second year as a minimum assuming they pass finals.  Otter-Sharp added to this in correspondence with the Pro-Vice-Chancellor for Education, Martin Williams, saying, “The minimum grade utilises the large amount of information about aptitude and attainment that our tutors have gathered about us as well as any past assessed work in order to assign students a predicted grade that would be a guaranteed minimum mark regardless of exam performance.”  The letter, which was written by finalist Ferdinand Otter-Sharp, reads, “It is fairer to judge students on their performance while at Oxford rather than their ability to study effectively in hugely varied home environments while dealing with the extraordinary mental stress of being isolated during a global pandemic which will have hugely varied effects on students”. center_img An open letter signed by 1,600 finalists has asked the University to give finalists their predicted grade as a “guaranteed minimum” in light of disruption caused by COVID-19.  “This is not a proposal to completely cancel finals. Oxford students have been preparing hard for finals and are not the type to settle for a minimum grade. The proposal is to provide a safety net, to help those most disadvantaged by the current situation” Martin Williams has given a statement in response to the letter, saying, “I appreciate the considered and constructive tone of the Oxford Finalists letter, it is greatly appreciated at this time. As rightly noted in the content, the pandemic is having a huge effect on students, who have been forced into an academic limbo, through no fault of their own, and I sympathise.”  Image credit to Saiiko / Wikimedia Commons. License: CC-BY-SA-3.0.last_img read more

0

Dark Star Orchestra Closes Out Winter Tour With Fiery Performance At The Riverside Theater

first_imgLoad remaining images Last night Dark Star Orchestra ended their winter tour with an exclamation point at the Riverside Theater in Milwaukee by playing an original Grateful Dead setlist. The show had a little bit of everything- staples, rarer tunes, Jerry Garcia Band numbers, and of course, fan favorites. It was a great show that left Deadheads remembering days of yore.The first set opened with “Samson and Delilah.” Immediately, fans were questioning what show this was, what year it came from. A scorching “Althea” followed. “Passenger” was next, and many were thinking it must be an early 80s show. However, it was quite evident that it was an original set list when they played the next song, “Let Me Sing Your Blues Away.” The only song Grateful Dead song ever written by keyboardist Keith Godchaux, it was only performed a few times in 1973. Dark Star’s execution was excellent. Another rarely played song in the first set was “Easy to Slip” from Bob Weir’s 1978 solo record, Heaven Help The Fool. Guitarist/singer/Bob Weir-look-a-like Rob Eaton nailed the vocals. A long, jammed-out version of “Shakedown Street” closed the set and foreshadowed the jamming that would come in the second.What Deadhead wouldn’t be happy with a “Jack Straw” opener, followed by an incredible “Scarlet Begonias” into “Fire on the Mountain?” Dark Star Orchestra was covering these favorites with absolute precision, and they were having a great time doing it. One of the most poignant moments from the show occurred when they played “Shining Star.” Originally played by the Manhattans, the Jerry Garcia Band brought it into the realm of Deadheads. Last night Dark Star played it very well. The vocals by Jeff Mattson, Rob Eaton, and Lisa Mackey were superb. The drum beat in “Not Fade Away” thundered as the crowd clapped along. Sandwiched between the rocking song was a gentle and brilliant “Stella Blue.” The night ended fittingly with the “Music Never Stopped” encore.Ultimately, Dark Star Orchestra is a top-notch Grateful Dead experience. It is fun to see both old Deadheads who used to tour with the original GD dancing along with a new, younger generation of fans that never had the opportunity to see the Dead play. Dark Star is quite the tribute to the ultimate jamband, and they will continue to be so as long as they keep playing.Setlist: Dark Star Orchestra at Riverside Theater, Milwaukee, WI – 3/5/16Set I: Samson and Delilah, Althea, Passenger, Let Me Sing Your Blues Away, Ramble on Rose, Beat It On Down the Line, Strange Man, Dire Wolf, Easy to Slip, Shakedown StreetSet II: Jack Straw, Scarlet Begonias >Fire on the Mountain, Estimated Prophet, Shining Star, Drums > Space, Not Fade Away > Stella Blue > Not Fade AwayEncore: Music Never Stopped[All photos courtesy of Daniel Ojeda]last_img read more

0

Harvard in Southeast Asia

first_img 2Geraldine Acuna-Sunshine ’92, M.P.P. ’96 (from left), moderates a discussion between Harvard Professor of Genetics and Complex Diseases Tobias Walther and Mehra Family Professor of South Asian Studies Sunil Amrith during the Your Harvard Singapore program. 13Drew Faust delivers a public address at Ho Chi Minh City University of Social Sciences and Humanities (USSH) in Ho Chi Minh City. 6Orchids flourish at the Botanical Gardens in Singapore. 4Drew Faust (from left) greets Harvard Divinity School Dean David Hempton and Harvard T.H. Chan School for Public Health Dean Michelle Williams following the Your Harvard Singapore program. 7Drew Faust meets with Singapore Prime Minister Lee Hsien Loong in his office. Loong completed a master’s degree at Harvard Kennedy School in 1980. 5Visitors stroll along walkways that showcase plants and diverse vegetation from tropical highlands in the Cloud Forest of Gardens by the Bay in Singapore. 18In the Hanoi studio of veteran and artist Pham Luc in Hanoi, Dao Thi Lien (pictured) arranges his works for display during Drew Faust’s visit. 22Visitors travel from around the world to visit the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi. 17During a meeting of the Fulbright University Vietnam community in Ho Chi Minh City, Drew Faust (from left) speaks to President of FUV Dam Bich Thuy, Ambassador Ted Osius ’84, Consul General Mary Tarnowka, and Harvard Ash Center Senior Adviser for Mainland Southeast Asia Tommy Vallely. 14Audience members listen to Drew Faust, a historian of the American Civil War, speak at Ho Chi Minh City University of Social Sciences and Humanities, offering her audience an at-times personal view of the Vietnam War and how it affected her and others of her generation. 16Reporters ask questions following Drew Faust’s university speech where she closed her remarks by emphasizing the important role that historians can play in helping individuals and society negotiate a war’s aftermath. 12Students wear their new Harvard hats, a gift from Drew Faust. Faust and teacher Vo Thi Mong Trinh (left) stand in the background. 3A crowd of approximately 400 alumni attend the Your Harvard Singapore event. 1Harvard President Drew Faust meets with Asia Club leaders at a reception before the Your Harvard Singapore program. Harvard President Drew Faust traveled to Southeast Asia in March, stopping in Singapore and Vietnam to meet with national education leaders, with Harvard alumni, and with schoolchildren, to whom she spoke about the opportunities an education can bring. Faust also spoke about the aftermath of war in a speech at the University of the Social Sciences and Humanities in Ho Chi Minh City. 15Ben Wilkinson ’98 (from left), Drew Faust, and Professor Vo Van Sen, the rector at Ho Chi Minh City University of Social Sciences and Humanities, take questions at a press conference. 10Students at the Ap Bac Secondary School, Tan An Hamlet in Cai Lay, line up to meet Drew Faust. 11Drew Faust (from left) asks Trần Thị Ngọc Hân a question while teacher Vo Thi Mong Trinh looks on. Ben Wilkinson ’98 helps translate. 21Writer Bao Ninh meets with Drew Faust near the Vietnam Military History Museum in Hanoi. 19Drew Faust visits the Vietnamese Women’s Museum in Hanoi. 20Drew Faust (left) visits Vietnam Prime Minister Nguyen Xuan Phuc in Hanoi where they discuss Harvard’s role in the development of the Fulbright University of Vietnam. 9The Harvard delegation meets with Vietnam veterans including Le Cong Huan who accompanied the group on a tour of a museum in Ap Bac. 8At the Ap Bac battlefield in Cai Lay, Tien Giang Province, Vietnam, Drew Faust (left) and Ben Wilkinson ’98 lay a wreath at the public commemoration site.last_img read more

0

Faculty present research concerning infections, stress levels

first_imgMembers of the Saint Mary’s community gathered for a faculty colloquium in Madeleva Hall on Friday to hear professors present their recently-completed research. Mary Welle, associate professor of nursing science, and Reena Lamichhane Khadka, assistant professor of biology, presented their research concerning healthcare-acquired infections. Alissa Russell, assistant professor of psychology, also presented her research concerning college students’ self-regulatory skills, daily stress and negative affect.Welle and Lamichhane Khadka began the colloquium with their presentation “Hospital-Issued Slipper Socks: An Overlooked Route of Infection Transmission?” The idea began, Welle said, when she found herself admitted into the hospital for surgery. “I had surgery, and I was in the hospital, and I did not want to get an infection,” Welle said. “I knew I was going to have to get up and walk, because that’s very therapeutic, but I also knew I was going to have those silly slipper socks on that prevent falls.”Welle said she worried about catching an infection from using her socks constantly.“One of the basic lessons of nursing is if anything falls to the floor it’s considered contaminated so they throw it back in the dirty linen,” she said. “I knew the slipper socks would be touching the floor and then I would probably get back in bed with those slipper socks.”Welle approached Lamichhane Khadka, who is experienced in doing research on healthcare acquired infections (HCAIs), infections that patients get from the hospital environment while receiving treatment for medical or surgical conditions, to help with the study. Four nursing and three biology students also aided in carrying out their research, Welle said. Welle said a previous study showed that slipper socks do pick up pathogens from the floor, but no research had been done as to whether the pathogens are transferred from the socks to the bed, so that’s what the pair focused on in its study.The goals of the study were to find out what kinds of bacteria are present in the orthopedic wards of two midwestern hospitals, whether there any potentially pathogenic bacteria present, how resistant the bacteria are to antibiotics and to examine the spread of the pathogens from the floor to the bed via the slipper socks, Lamichhane Khadka said. “A very high number of Staphylococcus species, which is a common gram positive bacteria species, was found,”  Lamichhane-Khadka said. “Of that species, 9 percent were Aureus in Hospital 1. This includes the infamous MRSA bacterium.” According to the CDC, MRSA is a highly contagious infection that can result in rashes, headaches, fever, chest pain and/or shortness of breath. MRSA is resistant to many antibiotics and is therefore difficult to treat. Results from the gram negative bacterial pathogens, were more diverse in both hospitals. Gram negative bacteria are usually of intestinal origin, Lamichhane-Khadka said, but they can also cause infections in other parts of the body, potentially resulting in catheter-associated urinary tract infections and pneumonia. The study found that citrobacter, salmonella, klebsiella and pseudomonas were gram negative bacteria found that were of particular concern. According to Welle, these results have significant implications for healthcare facilities, workers and patients. “Everyone wears those socks in the hospital, and most patients get up and touch the floor,” Welle said. “We have to think about the hands of those workers. We are taking those socks on and off to test neurovascular status and then proceed with care to the patient without washing hands. We need to think about lower surgical sights and incisions, which are ankle, foot and knee surgeries, that are coming in contact with the sheet from slipper socks.” Welle said simple practice changes can make a huge difference in the spread of infections. The socks are about 60 cents per pair, so Welle said she suggests that healthcare facilities provide patients with two pairs of socks, one dedicated to the floor and one dedicated to the bed. “It’s going to take teamwork to change,” Welle said. “Research has shown the next person in a room after an infectious patient can acquire the same infection. So, we have to think about the people who clean the rooms too.” Russel then began her presentation about the correlation between self-regulatory skills and daily stress.As a developmental psychologist, Russell said she focuses her studies on how people change over time. Specifically in this study, she is focussing on the interactions and variability of the global and general experience of college women compared to their daily lived experience.“You may be unsurprised to find out college students are finding greater difficulty in regulating their emotions,” Russel said. “They are overwhelmed and anxious. Especially college women.”Although teens at the age of 18 are legally considered to be adults, Russell said she and other theorists have argued that college students are not adults. “College … students are in their own stage of life called ‘emerging adulthood,’” she said. “Students move away from home without continual supervision, but college isn’t real life, it’s a period of transition.”Russell says individuals in this stage do not meet the milestones of adulthood such as marriage, having children and monetary independence. In addition, their prefrontal cortex is not fully developed, meaning their evaluation of risks, rewards and delayed gratification is not the same of that of an adult from a neurological standpoint. The prefrontal cortex is fully developed in those who are aged in their mid 20s, she said.“Students also do not consider themselves to be adults yet,” Russell said. “They are exploring a variety of goals, their love life and a career. They are increasingly acquiring these skills.” Russell said self-regulation, the ability to align thoughts and actions with values, can help ease a college student’s transition to adulthood. This idea is supported by research that has demonstrated that self regulation strategies, emotion regulation and constructive thinking reduce depression, anxiety and stress the first year of college, she said.“How you react to daily stress has a lot of implications for well being,” Russel said. “Some people react more and therefore have more negative affect. Identifying strategies that can promote a better response is important.”Not enough work has been done to say which strategies are useful and which ones are not, she said.Russell’s study included 90 students from Saint Mary’s College. She evaluated three ways in which the students said they self-regulated. The first is goal commitment, which means a student has the persistent mindset of ‘Where there’s a will, there’s a way.’ The second is positive reappraisal, which means a student has a positive mindset and makes an effort to look at the bright side of things. The third is lowering aspirations, which means the student reevaluates goals and possibly drops a goal that he or she considers to be unimportant.Her study was performed in the form of a survey, she said. Students took the survey three times a day for a week long span. The survey asked students to answer how much stress they feel in the moment. Unlike previous studies, Russell wanted to evaluate student’s variability in their answers.“Two people can have an average of three,” she said. “However, that doesn’t describe their entire experience. One person’s answers may vary far beyond a score of three, whereas another person may consistently score a three on the survey.”Her results show that stress was a powerful predictor of concurrent negative affect, meaning regulation strategies did not predict anything beyond that. However, the regulation strategies did predict variability, she said. Those with lowering aspirations strategies had significantly more variability than those with goal commitment strategies. She said this means those students had more perseverance and, as a result, had more stable stress levels. Based on the marginally significant results concerning the interaction between strategies and higher or lower negative affect, Russell said she is unsure of the relationship between positive reappraisal strategies and current stress on negative affect. “The results tell us that how stressed college women feel is very predictive of negative emotion,” Russell said. “Therefore, changing the way they perceive stress can change the way stress affects them. In her future work, Russell said she hopes to diversify and broaden her sample so it includes males, other age groups and different types of weeks. “My study looked at a college student’s typical week,” Russel said. “Variability may change during vacation or finals week.”Tags: faculty colloquium, negative affect, nursing science, psychology, self-regulation, stress levelslast_img read more

0

Pests in Schools

first_imgGeorgia has strict regulations and rules when it comes to managing pests at schools. The University of Georgia Structural Pest Management Program (SPM) offers a biannual workshop on integrated pest management (IPM) for pest control operators who have school contracts in Georgia, Alabama, South Carolina and Tennessee. The program will host the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop on Thursday, Aug. 23.Registration is open until Wednesday, Aug. 22 for the workshop that begins at 9 a.m. at the Student Learning Center on the UGA Griffin campus. The workshop ends at 3 p.m.The workshop will start with presentations from UGA entomologists and Georgia Department of Agriculture representatives. Attendees will receive hands-on training through insect identification practice in the SPM insect identification laboratory and regulatory requirements review at the Georgia Structural Pest Control Training Center.Georgia pest control operators will receive five Household Pest Control (HPC) credits. Alabama operators will receive 10 HPC; Household Pest Control/Branch Supervisor (HPB); or Industrial, Institutional, Household Pest Control/Custodial (IIHC) points. South Carolina operators will receive one Core and four Category 7A credits. Tennessee operators will receive five C07, C08, C10 or C12 credits.To register for the fall 2018 School IPM Workshop, submit an application online at www.gabugs.uga.edu/workshops.html. The registration fee is $75 and includes the lectures, active learning and lunch. For more information, visit www.gabugs.uga.edu or call UGA entomologist Dan Suiter at 770-233-6114.UGA-Griffin is located at 1109 Experiment Street, Griffin, Georgia, 30223.last_img read more

0

Trail Mix – Greyhounds

first_imgGreyhounds is a band with nearly twenty years of history that I am just now discovering.That’s a shame, as these guys rock.With roots that date back to 1999 and a slew of records behind them – the latest, Cheyenne Valley Drive, is out now  – Andrew Trube and Anthony Farrell have been crafting vintage soul rock together for nearly two decades. Though they hopped on board with J.J Grey & MOFRO for the better part of one of those decades, Greyhounds was always a priority. Songs were written and shows were played. In 2016, the duo went all in, making Greyhounds their singular focus.The music world is better for it.It was only fitting that Trube and Farrell, along with drummer Ed Miles, ended up in Memphis, at Sam Phillips Recording, to lay down the tracks for Cheyenne Valley Drive. The songs are bluesy and soulfully gritty, and there is no doubt that the history of one of our most musical cities seeped into the sessions while they were recording.I recently caught up with guitarist Andrew Trube to chat about the new record, recording in a studio steeped in history, and his guitar rig.BRO – Did you tune in to any ghosts of sessions past during your time at Sam Phillips Recording?AT – It was hard not to. When you walk into the building, you are immediately struck by the energy. You can feel the past, but you also feel a rejuvenation. A bunch of great records are going to come out of there right now.BRO – You cut the record in three days. How did that urgency influence your sessions?AT – We pulled in the energy from the ghosts and did it how they did it. We set up some mics, rolled the tape, and hit it. Knowing the tunes helped, too. We picked a few from the catalog that we have had since 1999.BRO – I really dig the guitar tone on “No Other Woman.” Are you a gear junkie and can you tell me about your rig?AT – It’s pretty basic. I have a Fender Vibrolux from 1965 and a Silvertone hollow body from the sixties that I’ve been playing for the past twentyish years. They talk real good together. No pick. I just let my fingers do the talking. I try not to overthink my rig. Plug and play. I do appreciate gear, but most of it is out of my budget.BRO – Speaking of “No Other Woman,” we are featuring it on this month’s Trail Mix. I normally ask about the story behind the song, but I want to ask you about shooting the video for it instead, as it looked like a lot of fun.AT – We hope folks dig it. The video shoot was great. We did it in one day. We made my buddy Bobby Perkins dress in a James Bond tux and ride around town on a white horse spreading love like a country Cupid.BRO – I know you have your ear turned towards old Memphis sounds. Favorite record recorded at Sun Studios that I should check out?AT – So many incredible things were recorded at Sun. You really can’t go wrong. Some things that I dig that were recorded there are The Yardbirds’ “Train Kept A Rollin’,” “Saigon” by John Prine, and Sam the Sham & The Pharoahs’ “Wooly Bully,” just to name a few.The Greyhounds have a couple dates this weekend in Colorado before taking much of the month of July off. Our friends out in the Rockies can catch the band in Crested Butte on Friday, June 29, and in Denver, June 30, on Saturday.For more information on Greyhounds, their tour schedule, or how you can find a copy of Cheyenne Valley Drive, please cruise over to their website.And be sure to check out the video for “No Other Woman,” along with checking the tune out on Trail Mix, where it is snuggled up with other great tracks from The Slocan Ramblers, Twisted Pine, Christine Cavazos, and more!last_img read more