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Three honored as HAA medalists

first_imgThe Harvard Alumni Association (HAA) has announced that James V. Baker ’68, M.B.A. ’71, William Thaddeus Coleman Jr., J.D. ’43, LL.D. ’96, and Georgene Botyos Herschbach, A.M. ’63, Ph.D. ’69, are the recipients of the 2013 Harvard Medal.First awarded in 1981, the Harvard Medal recognizes extraordinary service to Harvard University. The service can relate to many aspects of University life — from teaching, leadership, and innovation to fundraising, administration, and volunteerism. President Drew Faust will present the medals at the Annual Meeting of the Harvard Alumni Association on May 30, during Commencement’s Afternoon Program.2013 Harvard MedalistsJames V. Baker has been an active citizen of Harvard, serving both his local community in England as president of the Harvard Club of the United Kingdom, as well as the global alumni community as the HAA’s first international president. He has always maintained an eye toward strengthening Harvard’s relationship with international alumni.Baker’s commitment to the University has been consistent since his graduation from Harvard Business School (HBS). A recipient of the HAA Alumni Award in 2000, he has served in a number of different capacities, including as an alumni interviewer for both Harvard College and HBS, an HAA elected director, a vice chair of his class gift committee, chair of the Class of 1968 John Harvard Society Leadership Committee, and first marshal of his class.His work at the local level in the U.K. saw a revitalization of the Harvard Club’s programs and a significant increase in the club’s membership. His talents were then recruited by the HAA to serve as a regional director for Europe. As such, he organized a European Leadership Conference in London, bringing together 16 European clubs from 13 different countries. The success of the conference led to it becoming a regular event, with a different European club acting each year as host. The format has subsequently been used by clubs in South America and Asia.Following graduation from HBS, Baker worked for Goldman Sachs in London and Zurich, retiring as executive director of the equities division in 1996.He and his wife, Maggie, are the parents of Chris ’96 and Tanya.William Thaddeus Coleman Jr. has devoted his life to public service. He was the first African-American to serve as a clerk for a U.S. Supreme Court judge, Justice Felix Frankfurter. Coleman was a contributing author to the landmark 1954 case Brown v. Board of Education, working with Thurgood Marshall at the NAACP Legal Defense Fund and later becoming president of the fund. He was the second African-American to serve in a presidential cabinet, as the nation’s fourth secretary of transportation during the Ford administration. In 1995, he was a recipient of the Presidential Medal of Freedom. Most recently, he has served as a judge of the U.S. Court of Military Commission Review.Coleman was first in his class at Harvard Law School (HLS) and was an editor of the Harvard Law Review, and his call to service has extended to the University as well. He has served as an Overseer and has been a member of five Overseer visiting committees — Law School, Business School, Center for International Affairs, Institutional Policy, and Social Studies. He is a recipient of the HBS Distinguished Service Award, the Harvard Law School Association (HLSA) Award, and the Harvard Club of Washington, D.C., Public Service Award, and he has been an HLS Traphagen Speaker. He has also been a member of the HLS Dean’s Advisory Board since 1997.Coleman and his wife, Lovida, have three children, Lovida, William, and Hardin.Georgene Botyos Herschbach has made enduring contributions to the University and is among its most valued and selfless citizens. After serving as co-master of Currier House with her husband, Dudley, she embarked on a wide-ranging career at Harvard College, including: assistant dean and director of special programs, registrar of the Faculty of Arts and Sciences, associate dean of academic programs, and dean of administration. Exemplifying all that Harvard holds dear, she worked tirelessly in support of many initiatives to enhance the experience of undergraduates.Having earned her Ph.D. in chemistry, Herschbach brought astute analysis to shaping policy as well as advising students, mentoring fledgling administrators, and counseling senior colleagues. She collaborated with faculty in developing innovative interdisciplinary courses in the life and physical sciences, and was a co-founder of PRISE (Program for Research in Science and Engineering), a summer program in which undergraduates work with faculty on projects at the frontiers of science.Herschbach’s family life has also been deeply involved with Harvard. While a Harvard graduate student, she married Dudley Herschbach, Ph.D. ’58, and became the mother of two daughters, Lisa, Ph.D. ’97, and Brenda, ’88, A.M. ’88, J.D. ’98.  For this family, the sum of their years as Harvard students plus Georgene’s three decades in administration and Dudley’s four on the faculty, totals a full century.last_img read more

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Ronkonkoma Man Killed by Rolling Car

first_imgSign up for our COVID-19 newsletter to stay up-to-date on the latest coronavirus news throughout New York A 30-year-old Ronkonkoma man died after a Dodge Charger rolled over him when he opened a storage trailer door to remove it in Stony Brook on Wednesday night.Suffolk County police said Jeremy Van Bemmelen opened the rear door of a storage trailer to remove the sports car, which was on an incline, when the vehicle rolled on top of him on Beacon Hill Drive at 9 p.m.The victim was pronounced dead at the scene. Homicide Squad detectives are continuing the investigation.last_img read more

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There’s more to life than football – Mikel

first_imgMikel has left the Turkish club after voicing his concerns over the coronavirus.“There is more to life than football,” the 32-year-old had said on Instagram.“I do not feel comfortable and don’t want to play football in this situation. Everyone should be home with their families and loved ones in this critical time.Turkish Super Lig games are still going ahead with Tabzonspor drawing 1-1 with Isatanbul Basaksehir on Sunday, while matchday 27 is still scheduled to go ahead this weekend.Mikel, who made 368 appearances for Chelsea between 2006 and 2017, said he did not feel comfortable with top-flight games in Turkey being played despite the worldwide coronavirus pandemic.All the major leagues in Europe have been suspended, while MLS has also shut down, while UEFA’s Champions League and Europa League have also been suspended, as well as Euro 2020 and the Copa America.Read Also:Mikel Obi quits Trabzonspor by mutual consentTrabzonspor confirmed in a statement that the Nigerian, who joined them last year and had a contract until May 2021, had left by mutual consent.FacebookTwitterWhatsAppEmail分享 Promoted ContentWhat Happens To Your Brain When You Play Too Much Video Games?The Very Last Bitcoin Will Be Mined Around 2140. Read More6 Ridiculous Health Myths That Are Actually True7 Universities In The World Where Education Costs Too MuchMost Popular Movies With Sylvester Stallone9 Facts You Should Know Before Getting A TattooThe Funniest Prankster Grandma And Her GrandsonWhy Go Veg? 7 Reasons To Do ThisBest & Worst Celebrity Endorsed Games Ever Made8 Best 1980s High Tech Gadgets7 Ways To Understand Your Girlfriend Better7 Truly Incredible Facts About Black Holes Loading… center_img Nigeria’s John Obi Mikel has sensationally revealed why he parted ways with the Turkish side, Trabzonspor, saying he cannot continue to risk his life for the sake of football.Advertisementlast_img read more

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NBA trade rumors: Anthony Davis news has fans working up Trade Machine deals

first_imgAnthony Davis won’t sign a contract extension with the Pelicans and has requested a trade, according to Klutch Sports Group agent Rich Paul, who told ESPN that Davis “wanted to be honest and clear with his intentions.”Where will Davis head next? If we take Paul’s words, the agent said Davis “wants to be traded to a team that allows him a chance to win consistently and compete for a championship.” But why listen to agents when you can listen to NBA fans who have played with ESPN’s Trade Machine? (Please ignore the fact that Boston can’t trade for Davis right now. Never let rules get in the way of a good deal.)Give Luka a good teammate on the MavsI know it ain t gonna happen but who says no #AnthonyDavis #nba pic.twitter.com/xf30mf3vyp— Mike&cheese (@Mikecheese5) January 28, 2019Sporting News’ Sean Deveney recently wrote about how Luka Doncic can change the Mavs’ fortunes in free agency. Why not start a little earlier and execute a trade for Davis right now?AD + Blake Griffin on the PistonsHey @detnewsRodBeard does this follow your trade machine rules? #WhoSaysNo pic.twitter.com/kuLKcQtFHP— Andrew Ritter (@BigPlaySlay) January 28, 2019I mean, it is a legal trade. MORE: Pelicans’ patience with Davis is bad news for LakersThe Trade Machine, per the website, “will let you know if your trade works based on the NBA’s trade rules.” The fun part about this is just because a trade is legally allowed to work doesn’t mean it’s a fair deal for anybody involved.So let’s take a look at what fans have come up with using the service so far…Absolute mayhemWhen Woj breaks this news, just know you heard it here first pic.twitter.com/le2as5qIiB— Ty🎚 (@Jazz7thMan) January 28, 2019I had to stare at this trade scenario for several minutes before I could fully comprehend what was happening. There are so many moving parts. There are 41 players in total being moved, including 13 from the Lakers alone. It’s truly remarkable.LeBron + Kyrie back togetherGet on the phone @cavsdan pic.twitter.com/WyvHWCnA05— Sports Nation Ohio (@SN_Ohio) January 28, 2019People think Kyrie Irving is going to join LeBron on the Lakers, but they didn’t think about the ultimate galaxy brain move. Get them back to Cleveland. This whole Los Angeles thing hasn’t been working out for LeBron.Anthony Davis to the Kings?who says no? pic.twitter.com/s0qHOF1Vnc— Riley McAtee (@Riley_McAtee) January 28, 2019Parting with Kosta Koufos will be tough, but Davis might just be enough incentive to get Sacramento to make this deal. Knicks don’t need Zion with ADFolks, I have fixed the Knicks. Feel free to also give New Orleans every unprotected pick from now until the end of time. pic.twitter.com/YedkPMrvnU— Yaya Dubin (@JADubin5) January 28, 2019So many players involved. It’s wonderful. We need more trades that involve four teams and 10 players in the NBA.How the Lakers get Anthony DavisThis was the last Anthony Davis trade I drummed up after spending an hour on the trade machine at 6am. #ADTrade #NBA pic.twitter.com/P6lC62T7Q8— Ryan Herlache (@ryan_herlache) January 28, 2019The Lakers are moving on from EIGHT players in this deal, but they still get AD and Bradley Beal — the new “Big Three.”Or, they could just part with five players and only get Davis.Here’s the trade Magic Johnson should offer, and I assume he will. Lonzo, Ingram, Kuzma, Zubac & Lance (for cap purposes) + 2 unprotected 1sts for Anthony Davis pic.twitter.com/2hbKznjxc6— nick wright (@getnickwright) January 28, 201976ers move Jimmy Butler to get ADYOUR ‘I HOPE JIMMY BUTLER LIKES CRAWFISH’ 2019 PHILADELPHIA 76ERS:PG—Ben SimmonsSG—J.J. RedickSF—Jrue HolidayPF—Anthony DavisC—Joel Embiid pic.twitter.com/QrMeUjXYy9— maurice (@tallmaurice) January 28, 2019ESPN’s Jackie MacMullan recently said on Zach Lowe’s podcast that she thinks Butler is “on thin ice” in Philadelphia, so this works out for both teams. Philly can move on from Butler, and the Pelicans can move on from Davis.Make. This. Happen.Or, if you prefer a version in which Philly for some reason parts with Ben Simmons…Ok for real who says no? pic.twitter.com/MMpWai0NMh— Gregory McKelvey (@GregoryMcKelvey) January 28, 2019MORE: Why Celtics face early disadvantage in chase for DavisAnthony Davis to the … Heat?Anthony Davis to the Heat pic.twitter.com/JbAM47qDqS— Class of 2019 (@LilShortCuz) January 28, 2019Why not? Send AD to the WizardsI’m just saying it works. Anthony Davis to the #Wizards pic.twitter.com/RGMPrMUo2r— Mastahcheff (@Mastahcheff) January 28, 2019You get two players who have Jr. in their name in this deal. What a steal. Celtics add Anthony DavisPelicans throw in a pick or two, who says no? pic.twitter.com/wNDKUX60U1— ً (@GorntoCG) January 28, 2019The Celtics keep Kyrie Irving and Gordon Hayward in this deal. Send the proposal, Danny Ainge.last_img read more

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Springboks slip up Down Under

first_img7 September 2009The Springboks’ bid to wrap up their third Tri-Nations title came up short in Brisbane on Saturday when a fired-up Wallaby team beat the world champions 21-6.The hosts managed to play more of the game in South Africa’s half and showed some dominance at scrum time, although their efforts were aided by referee Wayne Barnes, who had the Boks scratching their heads as he blew up both props, Beast Mtawarira and John Smit.Make no mistake, the Australians deserved to win as they managed to apply pressure throughout and were ultimately rewarded with the test’s only two tries. But Barnes’ lack of policing at ruck time was well exploited by the Wallabies. They managed to disrupt South African ball with tactics that many other referees would have blown up.‘No excuses’However, a grim looking Springbok captain John Smit said after the contest: “There are no excuses. Excuses are for losers, so we have no excuses.“We’ll have to do the job against the All Blacks in Hamilton next week. We’ve got one more chance, one game, and we have to make the most of our opportunity.”While South Africa enjoyed the better of the lineouts, Smit suggested that the Boks expected more of themselves at the set piece: “We won all our lineout ball,” he said, “but by our standards we need to be winning at least half of theirs.”Wallaby skipper George Smith, after four Tri-Nations losses in succession, was thrilled to be on the winning side again. “I’m far happier with our effort,” he said.‘Fantastic’“We put a lot of work in, not only this week but throughout the Tri-Nations, and to get the reward now is fantastic.”Smith continued: “Well done to the Springboks for resisting us so well for the majority of the match, but in the end we made our possession and territory count. There was a collective understanding for us that we had to repay the Australian public for their loyalty.”Reflecting back on the match and where his team had excelled, Smith said: “I was very impressed with the way we scrummed and the way we handled the lineouts. There’s a few things we need to work on, but I’m just delighted with the outcome.”While Smith felt he knew where the Wallabies had got it right, SA captain Smit couldn’t quite put his finger on where it went wrong for the Springboks. “It’s hard to pinpoint where it went wrong,” he said. “We had our moments and just couldn’t put it together.”‘The new grey area of rugby’Bok coach Peter de Villiers was clearly unimpressed by referee Barnes’ decisions at scrum time. He called the scrums “the new grey area of rugby”, adding: “You do not know which way it is going to go, and sometimes it is more guesswork.”Early on in the contest, Jacques Fourie made a sharp break, but South Africa’s progress was stopped inside the Wallabies’ 22-metre area when they turned over possession. It was the first of what would prove to be a good number of breaks by Fourie and his centre partner Jean de Villiers.Australia took the lead after five minutes when Bakkies Botha was blown up for being offsides. Matt Giteau stuck over the penalty.Brilliant tackleThe Wallabies looked odds-on to score after 16 minutes when winger Lachie Turner received the ball in space on the right hand flank. He raced for the corner and dived for the line. However, Bryan Habana was flying across from the left in cover defence and hit Turner in mid-air and knocked him out of play with a brilliant tackle.Just two minutes later Habana was back at it again, this time stopping Giteau from scoring after the flyhalf had broken through the South African defence before failing to beat the winger in a one-on-one situation.After South Africa forced their way deep into Australian territory, a clearance from the Wallabies found Habana. He tried a long distance dropped goal, but he hit the ball badly and the kick was way off target.De Villiers then made a sharp break through the Australian backline. He fed Fourie, who cut inside and was then brought down only five metres from the tryline. The ball control at the ruck wasn’t good, however, and the ball went loose. Fourie du Preez charged down an attempted clearance before the Australians were finally able to clear their lines.Lead doubledAfter 25 minutes Australia doubled their lead to 6-0 when Heinrich Brussouw was penalised for playing the ball with his foot while lying on the ground at a ruck. Giteau slotted the easy kick.The Springboks responded by surging onto the attack and after a couple of minutes of pressure and retained possession, Morne Steyn struck a drop goal to get South Africa onto the scoreboard.Not to be outdone, Giteau snapped over a drop goal of his own six minutes later, to put Australia 9-3 ahead.Four minutes from the break, Steyn became the fastest South African to 100 test points when he kicked a penalty after replacement hooker Stephen Moore was blown up for playing the ball on the ground. His achievement is all the more remarkable when one considers that in his eight tests, he has come on as a substitute three times.Just before the break, the Springboks launched an attack that took them deep into the Australian 22. From a ruck, Du Preez fed Brussouw and he dived over the tryline to score. Referee Barnes, however, ruled the scrumhalf’s pass forward and the Boks were denied points.Second halfSouth Africa started the second half well and a monster tackle by captain Smit on Moore forced a turnover. The Boks made ground into the Australian 22 but, as happened often during the game, they turned over possession while in a good attacking position.Steyn attempted a second drop goal four minutes into the second period, but he didn’t strike the ball cleanly and it passed just to the left of the posts.A sweeping Australian attack saw Rocky Elsom make good ground before Bismarck du Plessis was pinged, rather questionably, at a ruck only 10 metres from the South African tryline. Wallaby scrumhalf Will Genia took a quick tap and dived over the line. His opposite number, Fourie du Preez, however, ripped the ball loose as Genia went over to prevent an Australian score.Counter-attackAustralia continued to do most of the pressing, forcing the Springboks to play from deep inside their own half. The pressure nearly paid off just after the hour mark when the Wallabies launched a counter-attack, using the width of the field.A grubber into the left hand corner of the South African 22 was fielded by Adi Jacobs, on for an injured Bryan Habana, just before a number of chasing Australian backline players. Caught right up against the sideline, only five metres from the tryline, Jacobs flung a pass inside over his shoulder. Giteau, however, snatched the pass out of the air and dived for the corner.Fourie reacted quickly and hit the flyhalf with a strong tackle. The television match official was called on to rule on whether or not Giteau had scored and replays showed that Fourie had forced him over the sideline before the ball had been grounded.TryOnly two minutes later, the Wallabies scored the opening try of the match. A well-executed backline move freed up Adam Ashley-Cooper and a nicely judged pass from Berrick Barnes put Ashley-Cooper through a gap. Substitute Schalk Burger was too late on the cover defence and the centre ran through unopposed to score.Giteau added the extras to put Australia 16-6 ahead.The Wallabies continued to keep the Springboks pinned in their own half, which led to the Boks trying to play from very deep.With four minutes remaining, scrumhalf Du Preez attempted to launch a counter-attack, but when he was tackled by Elsom the ball went loose. There was a suggestion that the big flanker might have knocked on, but referee Barnes waved play on.Victorys securedWallaby fullback James O’Conner scooped up the loose ball and found himself in the clear. He raced through to score the Wallabies’ second try and secure the victory.Giteau missed the conversion, but not long after that the final whistle sounded and the Springboks were left without a point from the match.This coming weekend, in Hamilton, John Smit and company can wrap up the Tri-Nations title if they, at the very least, hold New Zealand without a bonus point. The Springboks, however, have bigger ambitions than that, and they want to capture the Tri-Nations silverware with a victory.Would you like to use this article in your publication or on your website? See: Using SAinfo materiallast_img read more

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5 Years Since its First Tweet, Twitter Shows That 3 is Better Than 1

first_imgTwitter’s engineers work a lot. We now know that. We also now know that there are 200 of them who have been working since last June to make sure of one thing – that three data centers are better than one.Today is Twitter’s five year anniversary, a fitting day to get a glimpse for how a new, upgraded infrastructure will give some guarantee that Twitter will be around for five more years and hopefully a lot longer than that.In a revealing blog post yesterday by Twitter engineer Michael Abbott, we learn a lot has changed since last June when Twitter went down for ten hours. Have a breakdown like that and it raises questions about the future of any organization. Twitter recognizes that. The new infrastructure is Twitter’s core team telling us and trying to convince us that the service is built for long-term scalability with uptime a sure thing and not a question mark.Twitter is HiringFirst off, it’s only a last mention in the post but Twitter is hiring, looking for more to join its ranks. Abbott:P.S. Twitter is hiring across engineering and operations. If you want to develop novel systems that scale on the order of billions, join the flock.That’s an important point. It shows that Twitter will continue to invest people into its infrastructure. It distinguishes Twitter as a world-class technology company that is building an intellectual capacity as much as anything else.It also backs up what Abbott says are the long-term plans that Twitter made and began putting into place last September. A plan that Abbott writes will guarantee three things:Keep pace with capacity needs.Give the user and developer community better reliability.Allow for new product offerings. alex williams Top Reasons to Go With Managed WordPress Hosting The infrastructure sits at the core of the strategy. To start, the engineers replicated Twitter’s core systems to a second data center, where it moved, among other things, Jack Dorsey’s first tweet from @jack to the latest from @honeybadger. The second data center served as a staging laboratory for Twitter’s replication and migration strategies. Simultaneously, Twitter prepped its third larger data center as its final nesting ground. And who is @honeybadger you may ask? Honeybadger is a Twitter creation that stopped by a Twitter company meeting last week. Honeybadger is hilarious. We’re not sure what @honeybadger has to do with Twitter’s new data centers except for the entertainment quotient.But the infrastructure investment is a confident step for Twitter, showing that it’s here for the long-run with a level of service users and developers expect from a world-class technology company. Tags:#cloud#Data Centers center_img Related Posts Serverless Backups: Viable Data Protection for … How Intelligent Data Addresses the Chasm in Cloud Cloud Hosting for WordPress: Why Everyone is Mo…last_img read more

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The state apparatus vanished when floods swept Jammu & Kashmir. But it must get its act together to deal with the aftermath. Is it up to the task?

first_imgA flood victim with her children in SrinagarZinda ho?” As the people of Srinagar return to the forced sham that passes for normalcy two weeks after the fury of the Jhelum changed their lives forever, that brutal, forthright question seems to have been transformed into a straightforward term of endearment.,A flood victim with her children in SrinagarZinda ho?” As the people of Srinagar return to the forced sham that passes for normalcy two weeks after the fury of the Jhelum changed their lives forever, that brutal, forthright question seems to have been transformed into a straightforward term of endearment. The ‘Assalaam aleikum’ will come later, perhaps next week or the week after. Today, just these words, part-reassurance-part-statement, are enough. Are you alive? Already, Srinagar’s world is being circumscribed by the events of the last fortnight. Seven days ago, by September 12, the fury of the flood was abating a week before that, on September 6, it was just about beginning. As reminiscences of those hours take over, survivors report their slow oscillation between a crowded bunch of memories-and emptiness.The slow rise of water as it, surprisingly, lapped at your feet that unforgettable morning of September 7 in the kitchen, at about 6.30 a.m. So you step out of your ground floor apartment in Jawahar Nagar to see where it is coming from, open the small gate that leads to the street and look right. There’s a wall of water moving rapidly in your direction, about 8-10 feet high, carrying a whitecoloured Scorpio vehicle in its wake. You step back and run back home, fear overwhelming your thudding heart. The next hour is taken up in transporting the goods of your elderly landlord from the second to the third floor. By the time you return to your own ground-floor apartment, the gas cylinders are floating in the water, hitting your chest. You can hardly keep your grip on the floor. It is impossible to retrieve the hand-written, 250-year-old Koran normally kept on the top shelf, out of reach of children and all other harm, that has been especially gifted to you by the family.advertisementNearly two weeks later, as Srinagar fights to hold on to a semblance of its old dignity, the fragility of its citizenry is exposed for all the world to see. On the Bemina-Tengpora road close to the airport, several people displaced by the waters have set up tents on the flyover’s central verge. By the middle of November, winter will set in, which means they have two months to find a house to live in. In these parts, the winter is so severe that cement doesn’t take long to freeze over. The normally short working season, from April to November, has just become even more truncated.In Jawahar Nagar and Raj Bagh, colonies of the middle bureaucracy and the new rich, the water is still chest-high. But several residents have already returned home to protect the remainder of their worldly goods. That’s because the looters, allegedly shikarawallahs offering a helping hand to victims desperate to get away, are said to return in the dead of night. What the Jhelum gives, it also takes away. Meanwhile, two heavy-duty pumps sent by the Central government started working in the Rajbagh area more than a week after the disaster. But as the water level recedes, local volunteers are finding more and more bodies of those who didn’t make the escape.Apathy fuels outrageAcross Srinagar, old men grown grey with unkept promises made by successive governments are slow to anger, as you ask them about that morning and how and why the Jhelum broke its banks. Younger men, fed on a cyclical diet of conflict and resentment, curfew and hartal as well as much bigger words such as “intifada”, have a much shorter fuse. But as they ride the waters in wooden boats, some of them converted from coffins borrowed from the local masjid, their anger wells over into cursing beneath their breath.Flood waters inundate Lal Chowk, the commercial hub of Srinagar”Where are our MLAs? They haven’t shown their faces to us in our hour of need. This Nasir Wani, before he got elected as the National Conference MLA from Amirakadal constituency, used to have a monthly account in my provision store in Jawahar Nagar and would often find it difficult to pay up. Today he is a very rich man. Where did he get his money from? All these men know is to make money off our pain and our grief,” says Mushtaq, riding on a local volunteer’s boat to shore up supplies at home.This mounting anger against an apathetic political class, which failed to stand by its people as the life-giving river became a river of death, is fuelled by an insensitive civil administration which preferred to fall back on bureaucratic lethargy and red-tapism rather than cut short the rules in the distribution of food supplies in this hour of crisis. Stories abound of godowns full of rice and wheat which could not be opened because the man who had the key to the lock had gone to Jammu. In an exclusive interview with INDIA TODAY, Jammu and Kashmir Chief Minister Omar Abdullah admitted that 24 crucial hours were lost in one instance because officials insisted that trucks carrying supplies would need to be first registered, their dispatch order signed and only then released.advertisementBut the anger that manifests against Abdullah’s government is also spilling over into resentment against the army, the air force as well as National Disaster Relief Force (NDRF) personnel, who are being increasingly perceived as demanding gratitude from an ingrate people-although, Kashmiris admit, they have all performed yeoman service. As they put it, “a completely insensitive mainstream media” has changed the tone of the army/air force/NDRF rescue, by forcing Srinagar’s citizenry to publicly admit homage.”Don’t get us wrong,” says Manzoor Ahmed, a retired driver who lives in downtown Srinagar. “We know that the Indian Army saved hundreds of people in this flood, and we are grateful for that. When the army men went in with their boats, they didn’t worry whether people were Kashmiri or tourist, Muslim or Pandit, their only concern was who was in greater danger and needed to be rescued first. We appreciate that very much. But when your media keeps rubbing it into our face that we are ungrateful for all that is being done for us, then it really bothers,” he adds.Ahmed says people should also not forget that hundreds of Kashmiri civilians also put themselves into grave personal danger by taking their shikaras into the roiling waters of the Jhelum and rescuing ailing men, pregnant women and children. Several worked alongside the army, several alone. “We must all acknowledge their contribution,” he adds.Asked why he and his government were missing from the streets of Srinagar, Abdullah said, “At first, we were constrained by the lack of communications. The telephone network was completely down and even I couldn’t get in touch with my ministers or my senior officials. Then we were trying to get the people out. But I agree, the government needs to be seen interacting with the people in their hour of crisis. The crowds may get hostile, but we have to understand that,” he added.Here and nowIn this volatile climate, Abdullah admits the challenges ahead are grave. Large parts of the city are still under water -notably Jawahar Nagar and Rajbagh, where the Jhelum breached its banks and converted these colonies into a veritable death-trap, as well as parts of Bemina, Tengpora and Batamaloo-and stagnant water is a direct invitation to water-borne diseases such as gastroenteritis, dysentery and diarrhoea. Union health minister Dr Harsh Vardhan, who flew into Srinagar to take stock, and his doctors have advised that all children in the age-group of 0-15 years be inoculated against measles. Dog bites are being reported, and the fear of rabies is rising, as scared and famished street dogs who have survived the flood look to assuage their hunger.advertisementVIP colony Jawahar Nagar is one of the worst-affected areas in SrinagarWith insulin and anti-blood pressure drugs in high demand, Kiran Mazumdar-Shaw of Biocon is believed to have sent a few tonnes of the former from Bangalore. Relief organisations are in fact putting their best face forward, among them the Kashmir Valley in Delhi for Flood Relief (KVIDFR), which started out as a group of well-meaning as well as well-to-do South Srinagar kids from out of town, but has grown into an organised group that has gone into the deepest parts of the city to provide relief to people.The fear of an impending epidemic, especially if the water-logged areas are not cleared soon, gnaws at government and private doctors alike. Old British records from the 1902 flood that last submerged the Kashmir Valley reveal that while only 92 died in the Jhelum’s fury, as many as 15,000 were killed by the diseases that came in the wake of the flood. According to Dr Naqshbandi of the private Ahmed hospital near the Srinagar airport-to which several patients were shifted since the government hospitals were shut-the lack of diagnostic equipment, now lost in the flood, will significantly deter the detection of even simple diseases.Moreover, with the winter looming large, the forced proximity of people is likely to aggravate infections. Orders have also been issued to remove carcasses of animals- chickens, dogs, cows littering street corners. On the outskirts of Srinagar, more than half the cattle at the army’s 330-strong dairy farm have died; the government is still looking for place to bury them. People who were rescued from their flooded homes even 3-4 days after the arrival of the flood and happened to walk past the army dairy, reported a thunderous lowing of the cattle those nights, as if it were a prophecy of doomsday.The telecommunication network, both government owned and private, remains spotty at best. Bitter that the lines are still down, Abdullah holds fort from Hari Nivas, one of several beautifully appointed pleasure houses of the former maharaja of Kashmir. He has finally been able to call a meeting of his council of ministers here more than a week after the flood, as his Secretariat is still under a couple of feet of water. But these elected representatives are said to be mutinous, and don’t want to stay in Srinagar.Volunteers distribute drinking water bottlesStories abound. Health minister Taj Mohiuddin was so keen on leaving the capital that he barely met his wife for an hour before rushing to his constituency, Uri. Revenue, relief and rehabilitation minister Ajaz Ahmad Khan would rather stay in the Jammu region, near his constituency Gool Arnas, as does Minister for Housing, Horticulture, Culture and Sports, Raman Bhalla. None of them have been sighted on the streets of the capital since the deluge, although several were spotted on the freshly mowed lawns of Hari Nivas. Plans are now believed to be afoot to persuade them to accompany trucks of food supplies into the flood-affected areas so that the people, furious at being abandoned in their hour of need, do not take out their pent-up frustration and anger on them.Chief Secretary Iqbal Khandey, also standing on the lawns of Hari Nivas in the company of Bhalla, Urban Development and Urban Local Bodies minister Nawang Rigzin Jora and Abdullah’s confidante Devinder Rana, is unwilling to answer questions about why he and the rest of his civil administration have failed to lead the civilian relief effort. Asked where the government relief camps are located, Khandey at first points to the Dal, upon which a junior official softly interjects to say that most people have left from there, then adds that there are a few in the Nishat Bagh area.Meanwhile, the city has been divided into three zones, one senior official in charge of each to supervise the removal of garbage. Restoring the city’s water supply is a priority, which even in ordinary times was mixed with alum and chlorine; a few days ago 200 tonnes was ordered to be flown in. The army is supplementing the effort by providing reverse osmosis (RO) systems that churn out 300,000 gallons of water a day. But everywhere in the city, in areas like Maisuma considered to be the stronghold of separatist leader Yasin Malik as well as in the innards of Barbar Shah, the filthy streets are being cleaned by the people who live there. Elsewhere in Sheikh Bagh, close to Lal Chowk, shopkeepers have deployed their own hosepipes to pump the water out. If the state is deploying people, they are few and far in between and largely invisible.Certainly, the army has played a stellar role in providing medical services in Srinagar, treating infants as young as four days. As many as 80 medical teams and six army field hospitals have been established, which are likely to remain operational at least for another month.Economy under waterThe loss to life and property in the Jammu region has also been severe. Intersected by the mighty Chenab and the Tawi rivers and their various tributaries and feeders, the shock effect of the late monsoon deluge was felt when a bus carrying a marriage party fell into the river below, killing as many as 63 people, out of the total toll of 164 so far. According to Northern Army Commander Lt-Gen D. S. Hooda, who led the army’s rescue operations in the state, “No one expected the speed at which the water came. Many casualties occurred as people tried to cross causeways,” he said. Luckily, the rains stopped around September 8, allowing the waters to flow onwards into Pakistan in the following 24 hours, making the task of connecting Rajouri and Poonch much easier. Electricity and water supply was restored, as was communication and the vital road supply route.A flooded ward in SMHS hospital, the valley’s top general hospitalAccording to Shakeel Qalander, entrepreneur and member of former PM Manmohan Singh’s economic advisory council, back-of-the-envelope calculations puts the estimated loss to the Jammu & Kashmir economy at a staggering Rs 100,000 crore. With the floods also having affected several districts in south Kashmir like Anantnag and Pulwama, about three lakh houses (out of approximately 20 lakh in the state) have been either fully or partially destroyed; the stagnant water is expected to undermine the plinth by about 25 years. The expected loss in this sector alone amounts to Rs 30,000 crore, even as the government has announced Rs 75,000 for a damaged house and Rs 3.5 lakh for death. Abdullah said he had requested the central government to extend insurance against fire also to floods. Other key sectors, namely agriculture and horticulture -the current standing crop of paddy and apples respectively- shaves off another fraction of the state GDP.Tourism, including hotels, houseboats and commercial establishments (and each shop’s goods worth about Rs 25 lakh), will set the state back by another Rs 25,000 crore. Additional losses from the extensive damage to infrastructure- roads, bridges, etc-add up the rest. “This has been a huge flood which has caused such extensive damage that we will take decades to recover. We are grateful to civil society and state governments elsewhere in the country for helping the people of Jammu and Kashmir, but we also demand that the Central government allow foreign countries such as the UK, as well as international organisations such as the UN, to disburse aid to us in our time of need,” Qalander said.Winter threatAs the winter looms large, officials point out that the state only has until the middle of November to carry out its major tasks. Kashmiris are hoping that national infrastructure companies will build prefabricated houses and supply them quickly perhaps, some wealthy enterprises will even adopt villages or parts of Srinagar city. Operationalising the national highway and keeping it open is another priority as that is the lifeline of the Valley. The Srinagar-Baramullah railway track has just been restored, but it will take some time to normalise the link to Banihal. The exodus of outside labour, back to Bihar and Uttar Pradesh and Punjab, will add to Kashmir’s woes.Victims take shelter in boats in PulwamaCertainly, the 2014 flood has irrevocably changed the way Srinagar looks at itself, as well as the rest of the country. But as it waits for its fate to change, it focuses on tales of heroism that no one can take away. Like the story of Fazil, a 22-year-old small-time businessman dealing in tiles, who bought a boat for Rs 5,000 on the morning of September 7 and didn’t rest until he had rescued over a 100 people from the watery jaws of death in Jawahar Nagar.Or like the story of Talha Jahangir, satirist and much loved broadcaster on Radio Kashmir, who was in conversation with a government official the evening before the waters struck, just as the Jhelum began her assault of the city. The well-meaning official, hoping to avoid a general panic, kept assuring the Kashmiri people on air that there was nothing to fear from the encircling rumours of devastation, until Jahangir gently told him that the water had reached his feet inside the studio and that he was cutting short the show. Radio Kashmir as well as the local Doordarshan station shut down soon after.Or even like the rescue of Srinagar’s very important people on Church Lane, carried out by jawans of the CRPF’s 79th Battalion in the adjacent Badami Bagh cantonment area: senior bureaucrats, including chief secretary Khandey, three senior judges besides Chief Justice M.M. Kumar, as well as the state’s intelligence chief B. Srinivas were taken out, along with 40-50 hired help who had been left behind. All the government ministers for whom they worked had fled the previous night, warned by news of the impending tide. Even in its worst hour of crisis, Kashmir’s elite had not been afraid of invoking a caste system of entitlement.With inputs from Manu PubbyFollow the writer on Twitter @jomalhotraTo read more, get your copy of India Today here.last_img read more

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Got A Question For Louise Winchester?

first_imgWhether it be a question about the 2011 World Cup, her role as coach of NSWCCC, or anything else you would like to know, send in your questions and we will ask her. Send in your questions to [email protected] or post a question on the TFA Facebook or Twitter pages and her answers will be filmed and will feature on the Touch Football Australia (TFA) YouTube page. To keep up-to-date with all of the latest news and information in the lead up to and during the 2011 X-Blades National Youth Championships, go to www.nyc.mytouchfooty.com. Don’t forget to follow Touch Football Australia on Facebook and Twitter by clicking on the following links: www.facebook.com/#!/pages/Touch-Football-Australia/384949403384 www.twitter.com/touchfootyaus Touch Football Australia’s YouTube Channel will also be updated regularly throughout the event with highlights and interviews from the 2011 X-Blades National Youth Championships. To view the Channel, please click on the following link: www.youtube.com/touchfootballauslast_img read more

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Womens soccer Ohio State picks up pair of victories over weekend

In the 52nd minute, OSU senior forward Nichelle Prince was fed a ball through Purdue’s defense to face off 1-on-1 with the goalkeeper, ultimately resulting in a score for the Olympian.  This upped the Buckeye’s lead to 3-0.  Two minutes later in the 54th, Prince’s shot again found the back of the net, making it a 4-0 lead.  Strong defense continued throughout the game, but ultimately could not be perfect, as Purdue senior midfielder Milaro Gianna snapped the shutout, scoring Purdue’s only goal of the day.OSU prevailed with a 4-1 victory in the end. The Buckeyes hit the road Thursday, first traveling to College Park, Maryland to face off against the 4-9-1 (1-5-0 Big Ten play) Terrapins.  OSU began with a powerful and quick attack, where senior forward Lindsay Agnew scored the first goal in the first minute to propel the Buckeyes to the lead.  Less than a minute later, junior midfielder Emma Firenze netted her first goal of the season, doubling the Buckeyes’ lead to 2-0. Quick goal-scoring was a common theme on the weekend, as the Buckeyes had a fiery start again versus the Boilermakers, with a goal in the eighth minute by Edwards.  This marked her third goal within the two weekend matches.  Near the end of the first half, senior midfielder Nicole Miyashiro assisted a goal by redshirt senior forward Morgan Wolcott to put the Buckeyes up 2-0. OSU’s shots doubled that of Purdue’s at the end of the first half, with 10 shots to five.   The Buckeyes improved to 9-4-2 on the season (3-2-2 Big Ten play), recording a total of eight goals in two games while maintaining strong defensive play, only conceding one goal.  OSU’s next game is against the Indiana Hoosiers at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium at 7 p.m. Thursday. OSU senior defender Nicole Miyashiro battles a Northwestern defender for the ball on Oct. 1, 2016 at Jesse Owens Memorial Stadium. Credit: Aaron Tomich | Lantern reporterA week of practice that constantly emphasized finishing offensive attacks led to a frenzy of goal-scoring this weekend for the Ohio State women’s soccer team.   OSU entered the second half versus Maryland having nine shots against 5.  Agnew created multiple scoring opportunities, including two crosses connecting with junior forward Sammy Edwards, both resulting in goals.  This put the Buckeyes up 4-0 after 58 minutes.  The Buckeye defense held strong, closing the game with a shutout over Maryland, earning the team’s eighth win on the season. Sunday, OSU made its way to West Lafayette, Indiana, to play the 3-10-1 (1-6-0 Big Ten play) Purdue Boilermakers.   read more

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OSU studentathletes prove blood is thicker than pool water

Ohio State synchronized swimmer Meghan Kinney didn’t think it was serious when she experienced pain in her knee. Doctors told her otherwise. “I had been training on national team in California for six months and I noticed this pain in my knee,” Kinney said. “I was expecting to hear maybe I needed surgery … instead they sat me down and told me they found a tumor.” Osteosarcoma, or cancer of the bone, was causing the knee pain that Kinney had believed to be nothing more than a tear in her meniscus. “I felt like my life was in jeopardy,” Kinney said. Kinney was diagnosed Oct. 5 and left the synchronized swimming team to recover from her chemotherapy treatments and the surgery to remove the tumor in her knee. “It was complete shock. It was one of those moments they always say, ‘You never thought this could happen to you,’ it was exactly like that,” Kinney said. “I just felt right away nothing else mattered.” Doctors removed the tumor from her knee, and followed up with full body scans to make sure there were no other tumors. They did not find any. After the removal, Kinney has no cancer in her body, but is going through extensive chemotherapy to make sure the cancer never comes back. “The only cancerous tumor they found was in my knee,” Kinney said. “I am getting eight more months of chemo to prevent anything in the future, because if it came about in the first place it could come back in a while.” When word got around to other OSU athletes, the rowing team took charge to help raise money for her. The effort became known as Team Meghan and has been a collective effort of multiple teams across campus to raise money for Kinney. “I think it’s just really cool to see the Buckeye family, especially in athletics, just coming together to support one of their fellow Buckeyes,” said Monica Finnigan, a senior synchronized swimmer. “Some people don’t even know Meghan. Nobody on the rowing team knew Meghan before they started this fundraiser.” Those involved in the effort, which has been going on for nearly two months, set the goal to raise $10,000. The money will be used to help Kinney with medical expenses throughout her fight with osteosarcoma. “I want to do this,” said freshman synchronized swimmer Julia Gaylard. “It’s not something that we just needed a few people to do this. I want to help her family and help her because she’s a Buckeye and one of us.” Team Meghan has raised nearly $4,500 for Kinney from selling wristbands, including $1,925 that was raised during the men’s hockey games on Feb. 18 and 19. The wristbands, which are teal and have “Support TeamMeghan.com” written on them, have no set price. Whatever the amount of the donation, the supporter receives a wristband in return. “We can talk about how Buckeyes are there for each other, but it’s happening. It’s so powerful to see. And the other teams have been huge in helping. It’s so meaningful,” said Katherine Greene, a junior synchronized swimmer. “It’s been so incredible to see that.” Kinney’s teammates said she has impacted the team and holds a place in their hearts, and helping to raise money and support her in her fight with cancer was something that they were more than happy to do. “Meghan is so dear to my heart, that I wouldn’t do this for just anybody. The fact that she is such a close friend, I feel very privileged to be able to help her,” Greene said. “I just feel so happy to do this for her. I really feel so blessed.” Other teams involved in Team Meghan, whether through donating money or volunteering time, are fencing, men’s swimming and diving, men’s hockey, men’s track, women’s volleyball and men’s golf. Kinney said she is grateful that so many people, most of whom did not know her before Team Meghan, are willing to help her. “It means the world to me,” Kinney said. “The rowing team started selling these bands, before I knew it the whole team was involved in this fundraising effort for me.” Kinney said the hardest part for her has been not having control in her own life because of the cancer. “I feel like something’s been taken away from me,” she said. Kinney has hopes to return to the pool when she recovers from the surgery, which also included a knee replacement, and her treatment. “Swimming, it’s my passion, it’s my second home, being in the water,” Kinney said. “As soon as I can I’ll be back in the water.” read more