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Our target now is to win the Confederation Cup: Solomon Asante

first_imgTP Mazembe midfielder Solomon Asante says his side will make amends by wining CAF Confederation Cup following their failure to progress to the group stage of the CAF Champions League.Mazembe who were eliminated from the Champions League by South African side Orlando Pirates have been drawn with Liga Maculmana of Mozambique in the final qualifying round.The four-time African champions will now have to make the most of this competition to appease their fans according to Solomon Asante.“The fans are disappointed but that is football, we have to put that behind us and concentrate on the CAF Confederation Cup,” Asante told Joy sports“We have to be well prepared because our target now is to win the confederations cup to bring back the smiles to the Mazembe fans and the people of Congo.“We will just put our disappointment of not making it in the Champions league behind and concentrate on the confederations cup.”last_img read more

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CattleWomen’s Corner: Grilled balsamic flank steak recipe

first_img1 2/3 cups olive oil1/3 cup balsamic vinegar2 yellow onions, sliced thin2 garlic cloves, minced1 tablespoon … Grilled balsamic flank steak is an outdoor dinner-party type of dish — something to put on the grill when the weather is nice and the beer is cold.Keep it simple. The balsamic vinegar, olive oil and beef broth add acidity and depth to the marinated flank steak.This recipe comes from The Nolan Ryan Beef & Barbecue Cookbook.3 1/2 pounds flank steak, trimmed of all fatlast_img read more

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SETI Communication Only Outward So Far

first_imgWhile we wait for responses, all we hear are echoes of our own intelligent signals into space.Astronomers and biologists who yearn to find company in the universe met yesterday in Puerto Rico for a conference, Space.com reports. Titled “The Intelligence of SETI: Cognition and Communication in Extraterrestrial Intelligence,” its purpose was “to discuss the many forms alien intelligence could take.”All the communication, though, seems one-way: outward. “Can We Talk to E.T.?” Mike Wall headlines. If we must. They are not talking to us, so far. Much of the discussion seems about our strategy for reaching out.“Philosophical questions aside, from a pragmatic perspective, if we are to send a message, we must design it in a way that it can be understood and used by the broadest range of forms that intelligent life could take,” University of Washington biologists Dominic Sivitilli and David Gire said in a statement. “We can make substantial progress toward this goal by understanding the diversity of forms that intelligent life has taken on this planet.“They didn’t word it with the dreaded phrase “intelligent design,” but those two words were used, and were key to the point, even if separated by other words. How is our own intelligence to be explained? One remarked that “‘exaggerated’ intelligence, as in humans, may be a rare accident of chance, as rare as a peacock’s tail.” Stuff happens. Maybe that’s why Space.com’s opening graphic shows constellations: the peacock, an octopus, and the profile of Charles Darwin, author of the Stuff Happens Law.Fermi Paradox AgainA visionary physicist has a new way of finding the aliens. You could do this at home, with a backyard telescope, Science Daily says: just look for cosmic beacons they are sending. They must be out there, because we are just now getting good enough at photonics to send super-bright, reinforced-energy beacons of our location, and we’re not more intelligent than the aliens, are we? He suggests the possibility of SEDI, the Search for Directed Intelligence.On second thought, Philip Lubin (UC Santa Barbara) realizes there are implications of his technological theory.Lubin added. “Could we see each other? Can we behave as a lighthouse, or a beacon, and project our presence to some other civilization somewhere else in the universe? The profound consequences are, of course, ‘Where are they?’ Perhaps they are shy like us and do not want to be seen, or they don’t transmit in a way we can detect, or perhaps ‘they’ do not exist.”It’s hard to believe the aliens are all shy. Humans sure are not, broadcasting messages into space with reckless abandon. Which brings us back to the old Fermi Paradox: if they are out there, and if they are so much more advanced than us, where are they? They should have made their presence known long ago.Isn’t it ironic how the believers in SETI hate intelligent design, but find it very useful? They use intelligence to project messages, and they would certainly infer intelligent causes if they detected complex specified information from space. They know it’s possible to distinguish natural causes from intelligent causes, even when you can’t identify the designer. That’s the core principle of intelligent design.The possibility that Earth is unique in the universe as an abode for intelligent physical beings should not be dismissed too quickly, even with quintillions of stars out there. For one, it fits the empirical evidence from SETI (i.e., complete silence). For another, humans are not obscure, being about halfway in size between subatomic particles and galaxies.* Finally, we have the Creator’s word that he formed Earth to be inhabited (Isaiah 45:18-20). Nowhere did He say that He created other physical beings with souls outside of the Earth. And Earth was so special in His plan, He sent His Son to redeem the rebels that turned from Him.That should not imply, however, that the rest of the universe is wasted space. Nothing is wasted if He creates things for His own pleasure (Revelation 4:11). We don’t know the abode of the angels, who are extremely numerous according to the Bible, with ranks and hierarchies of power. And God’s future plans for the universe, and humans within it, are only vaguely revealed. Furthermore, heaven may not be limited to the dimensions we can currently sense.*Consider these four arguments for the unique existence of humans in a vast universe. (I, your humble commentator David Coppedge, have not found these discussed by others, so I’m going to claim priority unless shown otherwise. I’ve taught these ideas at star parties for several years.)Why are humans so small in a vast universe?We appear small by necessity. Given the laws of physics that make atoms and stars possible, human beings must be smaller than rocky planets of a limited size with sufficient gravity to hold them to the planet’s surface. They must also orbit a star with the right mass and type to permit a suitable environment on that planet. If God had made us larger than planets and stars, we could not exist, because our mutual self-gravity would destroy us. We would become black holes, not people. We would be incapable of communicating as God intended.If God had made us larger than planets and stars, He could easily have extended His creation by the same amount, leaving us with the same conundrum, “Why are we so small in such a vast universe?” His purpose was to declare His glory, including His omnipotence (Psalm 19:1).In the spectrum of size—from subatomic particles to galaxy clusters—there is only a narrow range suitable for the existence of complex, communicating life. At the extremes, diversity decreases, but in the middle, the capacity for individuality skyrockets. Consider: stars and galaxies fall into a limited number of categories; for the most part, they are much the same, and certainly incapable of constituting intelligent beings able to communicate. Planets, being smaller, are very diverse, but they are prisoners of gravity and the vacuum of space (SETI doesn’t plan on communicating with stars or planets, but with beings roughly our size on a planet somewhere). At the other end of the size spectrum, subatomic particles and atoms can be classified on a single sheet of paper. Diversity starts climbing with molecules, but they are too prone to atomic and electrical forces to have free will. Cells are extremely diverse, and they communicate profusely, yet only over limited areas, and without sentience as far as we know. It is only at the size range we inhabit (plants and animals) where true sentient communication between intelligent beings possessing free will is physically possible. And as humans, if Philip Rubin is right, we could theoretically project signals of our presence across the whole universe.Let me know what you think. Does this make sense? Are these arguments original? (Probably not, but I’d like to know.) (Visited 42 times, 1 visits today)FacebookTwitterPinterestSave分享0last_img read more

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Planning a Retrofit in the Pacific Northwest

first_img“Adding insulation over an air-leaky wall isn’t the best investment, since the air leaks can be anywhere,” Dorsett says. “Whether you add insulating sheathing or not, fixing the air leaks is the first order of business.”One option would be to drill holes through the siding and sheathing (or removing a clapboard) and blowing in either cellulose or fiberglass from the outside of the house. That, Dorsett says, would “tighten things up a lot” and give Steeg a whole-wall R-value of about 10, even before any exterior insulation was added. Even a single 2-inch layer of ComfortBoard would cut the heat loss through the walls nearly in half.“An old 102-year-old house like the one you describe is a good candidate for blower-door-directed air sealing,” adds GBA senior editor Martin Holladay. “Hire a home performance contractor or a weatherization contractor equipped with a blower door and focus on air sealing.”Steeg plans on removing all of the existing siding, he replies, so it will be easy to drill holes through the sheathing and blow in some insulation. However, he wonders whether it would be safer to remove the drywall inside the house to insulate the wall cavities because in that case he would be able to check the wiring.“That way I could remove all existing bat insulation (most likely incorrectly installed, just like it is incorrectly installed in the attic) and I can inspect the wiring,” Steeg writes. “With an old house like this I don’t want to do anything without seeing it first.”He adds that when he removes the siding, he will be able to seal cracks and seams in the sheathing and install housewrap.“I could place a membrane over the sheathing to completely air seal the walls,” he says, “but in an old house like this I’d be nervous. Rainscreen over 4 inches of Roxul over taped Tyvek over my sheathing seems like the least risky approach to insulating the walls of my home.” New windows will make a big differenceOne reason the house feels so cold may be the single-pane windows and clear glass storm windows, or clear double-pane windows, do not have a low-e coating, Dorsett says.“Weatherstripping the windows and replacing the storms with tight, low-e storms can also make a huge difference in comfort,” he says. “The low-e storm on the exterior raises the temperature of the interior side glass, reducing the convection drafts and raising the radiant temperature slightly. That might make the most economic sense if you don’t have to pull the windows when adding the exterior insulation.“If you’re pulling the windows and replacing them, a U-0.25-ish double-pane with low-e coatings on surface #2 (the usual low-e glass unit) and surface #4 (the inside facing surface glass) can make a major uptick in comfort,” Dorsett continues. “The low-e on #4 lowers the surface temperature of the window a bit, but it reflects body-heat and room heat back toward the source, improving the mean radiant temperature (the primary source of comfort) by quite a bit.”In fact, he says, the comfort shortcomings in the house can best be explained by single-pane window sash.“The U-factor of wood sash single-panes is usually about U-1.0, aluminum sash single panes run about U-1.2. That is about 10 times the heat loss of a cedar-clad 2×4/R-11 wall per square foot, about 4 times the heat loss of an uninsulated 2×4 wall, and the windows are likely to dominate the current heat load numbers, while dragging down the mean radiant temperatures.”Unless Steeg is shooting for Passive House performance, triple-glazed windows would be overkill. Yet replacing older units with low-e glass would make a dramatic difference in the mean radiant temperature of the room, and thus just how comfortable the house will be. What’s the best exterior insulation?Steeg clearly has mineral wool in mind for exterior insulation, in part because of the horrific fire in London earlier this year at a high-rise apartment building clad in a product containing polyethylene foam insulation.Holladay, however, tells him that a foam insulation exterior will not increase the risk of fire.“But if rigid foam makes you nervous, you can certainly use semi-rigid mineral wool instead if that’s what you want to do,” he says. “Just be aware that installing semi-rigid mineral wool isn’t as easy as installing rigid foam, because mineral wool is squishier. That makes fastening the furring strips a little trickier — it’s harder to get the furring strips co-planar with mineral wool than it is with rigid foam.”Yet there’s another reason Steeg might prefer mineral wool over rigid foam insulation — ants.Carpenter ants are a particular problem in the Pacific Northwest, he says. Citing an article by Paul Fisette, Steeg notes that carpenter ants like wet wood because it’s easy to chew. And they like foam insulation. Air Sealing an Attic Air-Sealing a BasementAll About Glazing OptionsGreen Basics: Windows, Glass, Ratings, and InstallationWhat Should I Do With My Old Windows? Calculating the Minimum Thickness of Rigid Foam Sheathing Installing Mineral Wool Insulation Over Exterior Wall SheathingCould a Grenfell Tower Fire Happen Here? Our expert’s opinionHere’s what Peter Yost, GBA’s technical director, added:Even if it’s all about thermal comfort, you still need to honor the physics embedded in hygrothermal management.Here is a document I use with all my clients on what we have to manage and why in older buildings: Hygothermal Analysis Summary.pdf.The order of priority is always the same:(1) Bulk water management(2) Air leakage (convective) control(3) Addressing dedicated directional drying potential(4) Thermal (conductive) control.Can you detail housewrap as a key element of your continuous air barrier? Sure, just make sure that it connects/extends to overlap with below-grade wall and roof air barrier components. But where is the control of air leakage most important? Low and high (from stack effect in cold climates, Climate Zone 4 and above), so rim joists and attic should receive the greatest initial attention in terms of air sealing. You should strongly consider redoing your wiring before you address the #2 priority, air leakage.Windows absolutely are key to thermal comfort, from both a convective and conductive perspective. You can keep your existing windows and increase thermal comfort, and if you choose that route try using this tool to learn more about your options. If you are considering a window replacement, use this tool for guidance. Brad Steeg’s Seattle home was built in 1915, and from the description he provides in this post at GBA’s Q&A forum, it’s not hard to understand why Steeg is so uncomfortable during the winter: not much insulation, single-pane windows, and lots of air leaks.“During the winter, my thermostat reads 70° but it still feel cold because the cold walls and ceiling suck the heat out of my body,” Steeg writes.Exterior walls on the single-story, 900-square-foot house are framed with 2x4s. Steeg says some fiberglass batt insulation has been “stuffed in nooks and crannies” as previous owners opened up walls in the past. But the insulation is apparently spotty, and what’s there is dirty, indicating plenty of air gaps.His plan is to add Tyvek housewrap, two layers of 2-inch-thick Roxul ComfortBoard 80 mineral wool insulation, 2×4 furring strips to create a rainscreen gap, and, finally, fiber-cement siding. Ceiling insulation will have to wait until an electrical upgrade in the future.Steeg’s single goal is “comfort.” The question for this Q&A Spotlight is whether he’s on the right track. RELATED ARTICLES Air-sealing before insulationA continuous layer of insulation on the outside of the wall is typically a good idea, but adding insulation to a wall with lots of air leaks is putting the cart before the horse, suggests Dana Dorsett. Hygothermal-Analysis-Summary.pdflast_img read more

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Panathinaikos beats PAOK in challenging last quarter

first_imgPanathinaikos beat PAOK in Thessaloniki 68-72 and now enjoys a 12-1 record and the second position in the Greek league standings. The Northern Greek team’s record fell to 7-6.Nick Calathes was the first scorer of the Greens with 16 points, 8 rebounds and 4 assists. Chris Singleton followed with 15 points, Mike James finished with 11 points and youngster Lefteris Bochoridis had 10.For PAOK, Jordan Silbert led with 18 points, Thaddus McFadden followed with 16.The visitors were up by 15 at halftime, 27-42, and their lead was even expanded to 21 points in the third period (54-33), yet PAOK started trimming the deficit. At first with a 7-0 run, then with more pressure on the ball to reduce the deficit to single digit amounts.PAOK scored 31 points in the final period alone, leaving Panathinaikos stunned, though the Greens were able to grab the win in the end.Source: Eurohoops.netTweetPinShare0 Shareslast_img read more

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10 months agoSuper agent Raiola on Napoli defender Koulibaly: A problem for all club owners and players

first_imgSuper agent Raiola on Napoli defender Koulibaly: A problem for all club owners and playersby Carlos Volcano10 months agoSend to a friendShare the loveSuper agent Mino Raiola fears for Italian football after the incidents around Inter Milan’s victory over Napoli on Boxing Day.Inter’s 1-0 win against Napoli was marred by four fans being stabbed outside San Siro, one dying from a collision with a van and Kalidou Koulibaly receiving racist abuse from Nerazzurri supporters.“Racism is ignorance by definition,” he told ANSA.“It’s difficult to talk to the ignorant, but we must always fight against them and be united together.“Having said that, where is the government, both the real one and the one in football? Where is the union? Where are the unity and solidarity between all the players and clubs?“This is a problem for all club owners and players. If Italy fails to defeat this cancer then it has no future in football.“Football is the mirror of society. It takes a unique objective, bravery, good ideas and b***s.” About the authorCarlos VolcanoShare the loveHave your saylast_img read more

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Fatal shooting of Colten Boushie a freak accident defence

first_imgThe Canadian Press BATTLEFORD, Sask. – A defence lawyer says an Indigenous teen who died in a shooting on a Saskatchewan farm was the victim of a freak accident.Gerald Stanley’s lawyer is making his opening arguments before a jury hearing the man’s second-degree murder trial.Scott Spencer told jurors that 22-year-old Colten Boushie’s death wasn’t justified, but they must put themselves in Stanley’s shoes.He said the Stanley family was facing intruders on their farm near Biggar, Sask., in August 2016 which created a panic situation.Spencer suggested it wasn’t unreasonable for warning shots to be fired to scare off the intruders and called the fatal shooting a “freak accident in the course of an unimaginably scary situation.”Boushie was sitting in the driver’s seat of a grey Ford Escape when he was shot.“This is not a justified death. It is never right to take somebody’s life. But that’s not what this case is all about,” Spencer told court in Battleford, Sask., on Monday.“For farm people, your yard is your castle. We have a family. They were working on their ranch. That’s what the day started like for Gerry and his family. What happened is they faced essentially (an) intruder.”Court has heard an SUV with a flat tire carrying five people drove onto the Stanley farm. The driver testified the group had been drinking during the day and tried to break into a truck on a neighbouring farm, but went to the Stanley farm in search of help with the tire.Stanley’s son has testified that on the day of the shooting, he and his father heard an ATV start and thought it was being stolen. The pair ran toward the SUV and threw a hammer at the windshield as the driver tried to leave the farm.Sheldon Stanley said he went into the house to get his truck keys and heard two gunshots. He said he heard a third when he came back out. He told court he saw his father, looking sick, with a gun in his hand saying, “It just went off.”“You have to view it from Gerry’s perspective and what he faced. The fear, the unknown. When you’re in a situation where you have intruders and you don’t have the luxury of being able to wait for police assistance. This case comes down to what’s reasonable,” Spencer said.“It’s not a self defence. What can you do to protect yourself in those circumstances? You can’t use lethal force but is it reasonable to deal with the circumstance to protect you and your family?”Spencer suggested Stanley’s gun misfired.“The reality is the gun just went off. If they would have just stopped … stopped stealing … just walked away he wouldn’t have had to go over there.” said Spencer, who added that Stanley will take the stand to explain what happened.The Crown wrapped up its case last week.last_img read more

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Experts tell inquiry to enforce Canadas Human Right obligations

first_imgTom Fennario APTN NewsA Manitoba professor says housing, education and health services are not policy issues – but human rights issues.“Sometimes, particularly when we refer to human rights there’s this idea that they’re just moral precepts and what Canada could be doing or should be doing, when in fact they are law with binding obligations,” Brenda Gunn told the inquiry on day three of the hearings in Wendat.Gunn recommends the inquiry identify Canada’s human rights obligations, and then hold the country to [email protected]@tfennariolast_img read more

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Tim Cook makes 1st visit to Canada as Apple CEO visits Toronto

first_imgTORONTO – Apple Inc.’s Tim Cook visited Canada for the first time as CEO Monday, surprising students at a downtown Toronto Apple store to highlight the importance of learning to code, and dropping in on a group of developers to thank them for their contributions to the tech giant’s app store.The unannounced visit by Cook, who as Apple’s chief executive since 2011 has overseen the rollout of the iPhone 7 and the Apple Watch, was the first time an Apple CEO has visited Canada since Steve Jobs made the trek north in the late 1980s.Cook surprised a class of Grade 7 students in Toronto’s east end as they learned how to program robots to dance on tables using Apple’s Swift programming language, recently introduced by the company as a low-barrier-to-entry way of coding.“Swift came out of the fundamental recognition that coding languages were too geeky. Most students would look at them and say, ‘that’s not for me,” Cook said as the pre-teens participated in an Apple-designed “Everyone Can Code” workshop, which helps children learn how to build mobile apps, at the Apple Store in Toronto’s Eaton Centre.“That’s not our view. Our view is that coding is a horizontal skill like your native languages or mathematics, so we wanted to design a programming language that is as easy to learn as our products are to use.”There are 250,000 apps in the App Store that have been coded with Swift, including popular ones such as LinkedIn and AirBnb. In 2016, Apple released Swift Playgrounds, which turns learning the programming language into a game for people of all ages — though especially for students.The Canadian visit follows a similar surprise last week, when Cook visited a school in the United Kingdom, as part of a whistle-stop tour of Europe, where Apple recently launched its “Everyone Can Code” curriculum in several schools.The CEO’s tour to promote the benefits of Apple technology comes after the company recently came under fire from shareholders over concerns about the addictive effects of gadgets and social media on young people.New York-based Jana Partners LLC and the California State Teachers’ Retirement System said in a Jan. 6 open letter to Apple that the company must offer more choices and tools to help children fight addiction to its devices.Among their proposals to Apple: Establish a committee of experts, including child development specialists; offer Apple’s “vast information resources” to researchers; and enhance mobile device software so that parents have more options to protect their children’s health.But Cook’s Canadian stop in was squarely focused on the benefits, both educational and economic, of Apple’s technology.There are more than 120,000 jobs in Canada directly related to Apple’s iOS and App Store ecosystem, the company said Monday. These positions can include developers, designers, entrepreneurs and other highly skilled roles.“Canada is an extremely important market for us. We have a great team in Canada,” Cook said.“I want to do everything I can do to highlight their innovation, their companies and their work, because it is a critical part of the entire user experience. I wanted to come say thank you.”Demand for digital skills in Canada continues to expand and the federal government has identified coding as a key job development skill. By 2021, there will be 210,000 Canadian jobs in the space and, based on forecasted numbers of computer science graduates, the country won’t have the skilled workers to fill these positions.Denise Salsman, who teaches the Grade 7 class that Cook surprised, said that in less than a year of implementing code into the classroom, her students have seen an improvement in their grades.“Coding is something my students, who will have jobs we don’t even know about yet, need to know.”Cook’s visit came the same day the federal government launched its first major investment in coding education.Navdeep Bains, Federal Minister of Innovation, Science and Economic Development introduced CanCode, a federal program designed to help Canadian students improve their digital skills.“It’s a $50 million program launched by our government to pave the path for Canada’s future leaders,” Bains said at a stop at Microsoft Canada in Mississauga, Ont.Bains said the program will give more than one million children and their teachers across Canada the chance to develop their digital skills.Follow Josh McConnell at @JoshMcConnell on Twitter.last_img read more

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Toronto and New York stock indices close lower as technology stocks weigh

first_imgTORONTO – Canada’s main stock index closed down Monday despite a rise in oil prices as technology stocks continued to weigh on markets in both Toronto and New York.The technology sell-off started last week when Facebook and Twitter released results that raised growth concerns. On Monday, Twitter dropped 7.6 per cent to add to its 20.5 per cent plunge Friday, while Facebook fell 3.6 per cent to make for a 23 per cent drop in three days.The S&P/TSX information technology sector was down 3.71 per cent Monday, including a drop of 7.95 per cent for Shopify Inc., as the plunge in U.S. stocks had a knock-on effect, said Michael Greenberg, portfolio manager at Franklin Multi-Asset Solutions.“The big contributor there is Shopify, but they haven’t even had their earnings call, so I think it’s really just a bit of a contagion of what’s happening in the U.S.”The drop in technology stocks, along with retreats for mining and health-care stocks, left the Toronto Stock Exchange’s S&P/TSX composite index down 48.48 points at 16,345.47.The index traded as high as 16,442.96 points during the day. The Toronto Stock Exchange as a whole saw 219.1 million shares traded.The S&P/TSX capped energy index provided the most support for the composite with a 0.62 per cent climb. Energy stocks rose as the September crude contract closed up $1.44 at US$70.13 per barrel and the September natural gas contract ended up two cents at US$2.80 per mmBTU.Oil prices were climbing as concerns increased on transit problems in the Middle East and other geopolitical issues have heightened supply concerns, said Greenberg.“You’re just sort of seeing some of the geopolitical risk premium being built back into energy prices at a time when there’s a bit of concern for say, Saudi Arabia to meaningfully increase production.”In New York, the Nasdaq composite index ended down 107.42 points or 1.39 per cent at 7,630.00 as Netflix, Amazon, and Google also closed lower. The Dow Jones industrial average ended down 144.23 points at 25,306.83 and the S&P 500 index closed down 16.22 points at 2,802.60.The Canadian dollar averaged 76.80 cents US, up 0.24 of a US cent.The December gold contract closed down $1.20 at US$1,231.50 an ounce and the September copper contract was down a penny at US$2.79 a pound.CGI Group Inc. closed down 53 cents, or 0.64 per cent, at $82.91 after announcing its U.S. arm had been awarded a six-year cybersecurity contract from the U.S. government, worth a total of US$530 million. The contract builds on work that CGI Federal Inc. has already done to enhance the cybersecurity posture of agencies participating in a multi-year program overseen by the U.S. Department of Homeland Security.last_img read more