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CPD: Lesions plan – managing the skin condition hidradenitis suppurativa

first_img No comments yet. Leave a Reply Click here to cancel reply.Comment Name (required) Email (will not be published) (required) Website Previous Article Next Article Hidradenitis suppurativa is a persistent chronic inflammatory skin disease of the hair follicles that can cause painful lesions Photo: Shutterstock Hidradenitis suppurativa is an inflammatory skin disease that causes painful lesions and scarring and which, though rare, can have disabling effects, both physical and mental. Rashidat Adeniba and Anne Harriss look at how occupational health can support those with the condition to return to work, examining the case of a female passenger vehicle driver.Hidradenitis suppurativa (HS) a chronic, rare and disabling disease that often establishes with painful lesions which may cause hypertrophy and immobility (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016). This case study explores the effects of HS on a woman employed as a passenger vehicle driver. It assesses the impact of her health on her ability to conduct her role and the recommendations for adjustments to support her return to work following her hospital admissions.Emma (pseudonym) aged 36 is of Afro-Caribbean ethnicity and worked full-time in a safety-critical role. Any type of personal impairment can endanger the lives of themselves and others (Carter et.al. 2013).About the authorsRashidat Adeniba is an occupational health nurse and Anne Harriss is Professor Emeritus and course director at London South Bank UniversityHS is a persistent chronic inflammatory skin disease of the hair follicles; it causes painful lesions that can lead to hypertrophic immobile scars (British Association of Dermatologists, 2017; World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016). It affects around 1% of the population in Europe, often occurring in otherwise healthy adolescents and adults, with women being three times more likely to be affected than men and it affects African and Afro-Caribbean populations in particular.Emma was diagnosed with HS three years previously. HS has had a significant impact on Emma’s physical and psychological wellbeing, causing embarrassment and depression. It has triggered fever and fatigue, preventing her from performing everyday activities such as carrying shopping and dressing because of her limited limb mobility from dermal contractures and lymphoedema (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016).PathophysiologyHS is long term, repetitive and painful, especially where there is inflammation in areas of skin that consist of apocrine sweat glands (British Association of Dermatologists (2017). Blockages of hair follicles resulted in a combination of boil-like lumps, areas leaking pus and scarring.The main areas affected by HS include the groin, armpits, perineum and buttocks (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016). The causes of HS are unclear, the effects are inflammation leading to the development of infections within hair follicles resulting in abscesses (British Association of Dermatologists, 2017).The hair follicles become obstructed by keratinised stratified squamous epithelium; these eventually rupture and their contents become deposited into the surrounding dermal tissue (Young, 2018). Apocrine sweat glands produce a sticky, cloudy and possibly odorous secretions (Slade et al 2003).The symptoms for HS may reduce after menopause but symptom patterns vary from person to person, and patients with HS can have up to 30 active open abscesses in one area (National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) 2016).There is usually a delay in diagnosing HS because it can be confused with simple infected lesions. There are no precise histological tests to confirm the diagnosis, which is made as a result of clinical presentation and examination of the affected area (Young, 2018).Occupational health referralThe role of the occupational health nurse (OHN) in case management consists of supporting the employee and offering advice to managers on how to deal with the employee’s limitation (Chantry and Harriss, 2017), advising the manager of the reciprocal effects of the client’s health on work and their work on their health and wellbeing.The aim is to assist the manager to understand how the employee can be supported while at work, particularly with respect of possible adjustments that will enable the employee to remain at work.Following a referral from her line manager, Emma attended the OH department for a face-to-face assessment and confirmed her agreement for the referral by signing a consent form.Emma had painful abscesses in both axillae and had been off sick from work for two months due to recurrent HS in both axillae, which she described as being the size of an orange prior to being drained six weeks prior to her OH assessment.These required regular dressings undertaken by the practice nurse at her general practitioner (GP) practice. She described living with these chronic wounds as being challenging, as they significantly affected her quality of life (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016).The choice of treatment for HS is based on severity of disease, type and extent of lesions and resistance to previous treatments (World Union of Wound Healing Societies 2016). There are limited options for effective treatment in HS. It is important to explore co-morbidities and propose lifestyle recommendations, such as weight loss in obese sufferers, and cessation in smoking are found to be very beneficial in improving HS, and associated cardiovascular risks. Other advice includes the use of medicated soaps, wearing cotton underwear, particularly soft, and friction free bras. The wearing of loose clothing and especially avoiding tight jeans trouser is also recommended (Slade et.al, 2003).Usually analgesia includes the use of non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs). Opioids may be used if NSAIDs are not effective. Emma’s GP recommended ibuprofen 800mg as required and she was also prescribed prednisolone 7.5mg daily, which had been reduced from a daily dose of 20mg.Systemic steroids such as prednisolone can be beneficial because of the general anti-inflammatory effects. However, relapse can be difficult to control when steroid dosage is reduced, especially if there are infections within the lesions (Slade et al, 2003).Emma recounted that she had had both abscesses drained. According to Slade et al (2003), drainage of individual lesions can result in temporary relief, however recurrence is foreseeable. If the patient does not respond to medical treatment, surgical intervention is the alternative option. Decker et al, cited in Young (2018), found that most patients with HS who had been treated by surgical interventions reported they would recommend it to other patients.Emma reported her wish to return to work but raised concerns that her work uniform might be uncomfortable, as it was likely to rub against her armpit. She was also concerned her abscesses could ooze while she was on duty. Emma indicated she was unable to wear her bra because of the location of the abscesses.The OHN should confirm the employee has given consent for preparation and release of an occupational health report (Faculty of Occupational Medicine, 2018). At the end of the assessment, the OHN released a copy of the OH report to Emma’s manager. Emma reviewed the report before release ensuring that she was happy with the content and providing an opportunity for her to correct any unintended factual errors.Psychological aspects of hidradenitis suppurativaThe skin is the largest and most visual organ of the body and has an important role in interpersonal relationships, self-esteem and perception of self and public image. People with HS can struggle with certain aspects of their lives because of the effects of HS. These can include abscess, fistulae and scarring causing soreness, exudate and odour in the affected area (Matusiak, et al 2010).Emma expressed the view that she was experiencing some residual pain and discomfort in both armpits. Exudate from the lesion resulted in odour and stained her clothes, causing her embarrassment when in public places.Ather et al (2006), cited in Young (2018), refer to embarrassment, self-consciousness, and social isolation of this condition, which is incapacitating and with adverse effects on the individual’s ability to function in employment and domestic roles (Nicoli et al, 2013 and Patel et al, 2017, cited in Young, 2018).Emma communicated that she was reluctant to go out in case someone knocked into her, causing her wound ooze. HS is physically and psychologically debilitating for sufferers, resulting in social isolation, failed relationship and depression (Slade et al, 2003; Theut Riis et al, 2016).Impact of hidradenitis suppurativa on quality of lifeHS has been recognised to have a significant impact on quality of life because of its effects on an individual’s ability to perform common activities of daily living, including going to work, walking up and down stairs, lifting objects above the head or taking part in sports. Pain is the most distressing factors for patients with HS (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016). Emma reported symptoms of pain, itchiness, oozing and she had several scars from previous lesions.Functional assessment and impact of condition on roleFunctional assessment is evaluating the functional components of the individual’s role and tasks. It provides the OHN with the information required to assess the individual’s specific circumstances (Everton et al, 2013). According to Murugiah et al (2002), assessment of fitness to work should evaluate personal aspects, work characteristics, work environment and other functional components. Emma’s role included collecting passengers’ fares, checking tickets and passes and giving timetable or route information. The nature of Emma’s role could be psychologically and physically demanding.Psychological demands included the requirement of high levels of concentration, and the need to stay alert and focused whilst on duty. There were occasions when bus drivers were subjected to verbal abuse by passengers; this could affect their ability to maintain their focus. It was essential therefore that both managers and OHN paid attention to any inadequacy in concentration because of its safety-critical role (Heron and Greenberg, 2013). The physical demands of Emma’s role included sitting for long periods of time and repetitive movement whist operating vehicle controls, including controlling the steering wheel.The functional impairment for a person with HS is the location of the abscess. HS lesions in the armpit are considered more painful than those in the groin. Furthermore, to reduce the conflicts between the disease severity and the disability experienced, both the physical and psychological impact of HS must be considered together (World Union of Wound Healing Societies, 2016).Emma had been prescribed prednisolone to manage the inflammation from the abscesses. The side-effect of this medication includes mood changes, restlessness and inability to sleep. These were essential considerations regarding Emma’s ability to concentrate whilst undertaking work tasks.Bowles and Harriss (2018) highlight that personal aspects relate to the assessment of the individual that must be related to the employee’s role. Driving was challenging for Emma, as she was still experiencing pain from the abscesses in both axillae and pain resulted in her being unable to raise her hands above her head.It is essential to compare individuals to their work; OHNs must have a good knowledge of the job specification in terms of essential and desirable qualities required for the job (Murugiah et al, 2002). The OHN conducting Emma’s assessment showed good knowledge of her role and understood the impact of Emma’s role on her health and vice versa. During functional assessment, the advice given by the OHN must be based on vigorous principles that are legal, clear and evidence based.Biopsychosocial modelThe biopsychosocial model is used mainly to give OHNs information, indication or alert about a person or their problem. The biopsychosocial model was used in accessing Emma’s physical, social, psychological and behavioural aspects of her condition.Red flags are the medical barriers. For Emma, these were wound healing as HS wounds can be problematic requiring lots of attention. Yellow flags include thoughts, feeling and behaviours, having unhelpful beliefs about pain and work, fear of movement and of re-injury (Watson, 2010). These were identified with Emma during the assessment. She expressed her concerns to go back to work because of the pain she was currently experiencing from the abscess in her armpits. She expressed fear of using public transportation, such as buses and trains.Blue flags are considered as the employee and the workplace, including identifying any concerns in regards to the employee’s ability to meet the demands of job. Additionally, lack of support at work, the employee’s view that the job is very stressful, and poor communication between employer and employee. Consequently, it is important whether the employer has a flexible approach in the workplace to support modified duties or work options to help promote a return to work (Watson, 2010).Emma lives with her husband and two children; she had excellent supported at home. On the contrary, she did not feel supported at work because of the poor relationship and poor communication with her line manager. It is important there is early and continued communication with employee and employer to help manager return to work effectively. Absence management is a manager’s responsibility, and managers should stay in contact with employer during sickness absence to help aid quick return to work (Everton et al, 2013).Waddell and Burton (2003) state that people on sick leave should be encouraged and supported to return to work as soon as possible because work is therapeutic, it helps to promote recovery and rehabilitation. Furthermore, this leads to improved health outcomes, improves quality of life, wellbeing and reduces the detrimental physical, mental and social effects of long-term sickness absence.As Emma had been off from work for two months, she now needed to start exploring her capability to return to work, which would facilitate and improve her quality of life.Legal considerationsHS, as has been made clear, is a debilitating inflammatory disease that can have significant impairment on a person’s physical, emotional and psychological wellbeing. Emma could be considered under the Equality Act 2010. Besides, whether the Equality Act applies or not is a legal decision.Jackson (2012) emphasises that a person with impairment must meet the three elements of section 6(1)(b) of the Equality Act 2010. These are: must have a significant adverse effect, must have a long-term effect that is likely to last for or have lasted 12 months, and must affect the person’s normal activities of daily living.The legal aspect of fitness assessment may require a coherence between the occupational health service, GP, hospital consultant and employers (Murugiah et al, 2002). OHN must have awareness to ensure that employers are fully compliant with their duty to make reasonable adjustment.The Equality Act’s employment code recommends that it is good practice for an OHN to put emphasis on any reasonable adjustment that may be needed, even when in doubt, if the person falls within the Equality Act 2010 (Kloss, 2012).Adjustments to support a prompt return to workVocational rehabilitation is defined by Waddell et.al (2013, p. 5) as “whatever helps someone with a health problem to stay at, return to and remain in work”. Consequently, return to work is a significant aspect of an OHN’s role.Prolonged absence from normal activities such as work can often be destructive to a person’s mental, physical and social wellbeing. Therefore, a timely return to appropriate work is beneficial to the client and their family by boosting recovery and reducing disability (Aylward et al, 2013).As already outlined, Emma had been off sick for two months. Therefore, a return-to-work plan was important and a key outcome measure for workplace health management.The decision as to whether the adjustment is reasonable should be made by the manager; the OHN role is to advise on functional capacity and make recommendations (Kloss, 2012).During Emma’s OH assessment, she indicated that her GP had issued a fit note for a further four weeks’ absence to allow more time for her wounds to better heal. The fit note was designed to allow GPs to have more productive conversation about work and health-facilitating discussions regarding what the individual can do rather than what they cannot do (Aylward et al, 2013).The following recommendations were discussed with Emma:A phased return to work undertaken over three weeks, with the first week working half days undertaking administration duties. From the second week, she would gradually increase her working hours. By the third week she should return to her role as a bus driver.Wearing a looser-fitting uniform to prevent any friction against her wound.Taking time off to attend hospital appointments and wound dressing at her GP practice if required.ConclusionHS is a debilitating disease that had a significant effect on Emma’s ability to function at work impacting on her physical and psychological wellbeing. An OH referral ensured her successful return to her normal full-time work responsibilities.This was possible by addressing any barriers to an effective return to work. Effective communication between the manager, employee and OHN facilitated an effective return to work.ReferencesAylward, M, Cohen, A D, and Sawney, E P. (2013) Support, rehabilitation, and interventions, in: Palmer, K T, Brown, I and Hobsob, J. (eds.) Fitness for work: The medical aspects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 69-87.Bowles, M, and Harriss, A. (2018) Wrist pain at work: occupational health referral of a laboratory work. Available from: https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/wrist-pain-at-work-occupational-health-referral-of-a-laboratory-worker/British Association of Dermatologists (2017) Hidradenitis suppurativa. Available from: March 2019Carter, T, Major, G H, Evans, A S and Colvin, P A. (2013) Health and transport safety: fitness, in: Palmer,K T, Brown, I and Hobson, J. (eds.) Fitness for work: The medical aspects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 564- 571.Chantry, S and Harriss, A. (2017) Role of OH in supporting return to work of man with rare neurological disorder. Available from: https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/role-oh-supporting-return-work-man-rare-neurological-disorder/Everton, S, Mogford, S, Romano-Woodward, D and Thornbory, G. (2013) Health assessment, case management and rehabilitation, in: Thornbory, G. (ed.) Contemporary Occupational health nursing: A guide for practitioners. Oxon: Routledge, pp.98-120.Faculty of Occupational Medicine (2018) Ethics guidance for occupational health practice. London: Faculty of Occupational Medicine of the Royal College of Physicians.Heron, R and Greenberg, N. (2013) Mental health and psychiatric disorders, in: Palmer, K T, Brown, I, and Hobsob, J. (eds.) Fitness for work: The medical aspects. Oxford: Oxford University Press, pp. 132-154.Jackson, K (2012). Disability discrimination at work, in: Kloss, D and Ballard, J (eds). Discrimination law and occupational health practice. Barnet: The At Work Partnership Ltd, pp. 44-71.Kloss, D. (2012) Disability management and law, in: Kloss, D and Ballard, J (eds). Discrimination law and occupational health practice. Barnet: The At Work Partnership Ltd, pp. 72-99.Matusiak, L, Bieniek, A and Szepietowski, J C. (2010) Psychophysical aspects of hidradenitis suppurativa, Acta Derm Venereol, 90 (3) pp. 264-268.Murugiah, S, Thornbory, G, and Harriss, A. (2002) Assessment of fitness. Available from: https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/assessment-of-fitness/National Institute for Health and Care Excellence (NICE) (2016) Adalimumab for treating moderate to severe hidradenitis suppurativa. Available from: https://www.nice.org.uk/guidance/ta392/chapter/4-Committee-discussionSlade, D E M, Powell, B W, and Mortimer, P S. (2003) Hidradenitis suppurativa: pathogenesis and management. The British Association of Plastic Surgeons, 56, pp.451-461.Theut Riis, P, Vinding, G R, Ring, H C, and Jemec, B E, (2016) Disutility in Patients with Hidradentitis Suppurativa: A cross sectional study using EuroQoL-5D, Acta Dern Venereol, 96 (2) pp. 222-226.Waddell, G, and Burton, K A. (2003) Is work good for your health and wellbeing? Available from: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/214326/hwwb-is-work-good-for-you.pdfWaddell, G, Burton, K A, and Kendall, N A S (2013). Vocational rehabilitation what works, for whom and when? Available from: https://assets.publishing.service.gov.uk/government/uploads/system/uploads/attachment_data/file/209474/hwwb-vocational-rehabilitation.pdfWatson, H. (2010) CPD: Psychosocial flags system. Available from: https://www.personneltoday.com/hr/cpd-psychosocial-flags-system/World Union of Wound Healing Societies (2016) Understanding hidradenitis suppurativa. Available from: http://www.wuwhs2016.com/files/WUWHS_HS_Web.pdfYoung, T. (2018) Back to basics: understanding hidradenitis suppurativa, Wound UK, 14 (1), pp. 51-55. Related posts:No related photos. CPD: Lesions plan – managing the skin condition hidradenitis suppurativaOn 5 Jul 2019 in Continuing professional development, Return to work and rehabilitation, Sickness absence management, Occupational Health, Personnel Todaylast_img read more

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USS Mustin Drops Anchor in Pyeongtaek

first_img USS Mustin Drops Anchor in Pyeongtaek View post tag: drops View post tag: USS Mustin Back to overview,Home naval-today USS Mustin Drops Anchor in Pyeongtaek View post tag: Anchor October 3, 2013center_img Training & Education View post tag: Pyeongtaek Share this article The forward-deployed Arleigh Burke-class guided missile destroyer USS Mustin (DDG 89) arrived in Pyeongtaek, Republic of Korea (ROK), for a port visit Sept. 27.Mustin is currently on patrol in the 7th fleet area of operations supporting security and stability in the Indo-Asia-Pacific region.Mustin is visiting Pyeongtaek for planning conferences and meetings with the Republic of Korea Navy (ROKN) to prepare for a scheduled exercise between the ROKN and the U.S. Navy.“Mustin Sailors are proud to continue the decades of cooperation between our two countries,” said Cmdr. Joseph Ring, commanding officer of Mustin. “This port visit and the upcoming exercise will strengthen personal bonds between our armed forces and reinforce our ability to operate with the ROKN.”During the visit, Sailors from Mustin will meet with counterparts from the ROKN to jointly engage in community service projects and hold friendly sporting competitions.[mappress]Press Release, October 03, 2013; Image: Navylast_img read more

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Extension Specialist- Family Life and Human Development

first_imgProvides educational leadership in the development, management,implementation, and evaluation of research based, integrativestatewide Extension programs that meet the needs oflimited-resource and socially-disadvantaged audiences. Deliverstraining and educational support materials for field staff andtheir clientele/ customers in family education, consistent with thephilosophy, policy and overall mission, goals and educationalobjectives of Cooperative Extension at North Carolina A&T.Specifically, this position provides educational leadership for astatewide program in family life and human development with specialemphasis on limited resource families consistent with thephilosophy, policy and overall education objectives of the NorthCarolina Agricultural Extension Service. Responsible forprogramming in the areas of parent education, child care anddevelopment, family and interpersonal relationships and youthprograms in human development.last_img read more

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Professor accuses Cambridge of anti-white racism

first_imgSpeaking to Cherwell, Professor Biggar said “Cambridge University declares that it ‘utterly refutes’ my claim that it engages in political discrimination. I have substantiated what I have claimed with argument and evidence. Writing in in the Oxford Magazine, a circular produced by and for faculty members, in second week of this term, Biggar penned an article entitled “Cambridge and the Exclusion of Jordan Peterson”, addressing the decision taken by Cambridge to rescind the offer of a visiting fellowship, extended to the Canadian polemic on the 19th of February. Professor Nigel Biggar has accused Cambridge University of“discriminat[ion] on the unjustifiable grounds of race, gender, and above allmoral and politics”. Biggar’s article charges Cambridge on three accounts:communicating the decision to rescind the offer to the Student Union, beforecontacting Peterson, not providing reasoning for its decision, and itsinconsistent attitudes towards free speech and the actions of faculty members. In December 2017, Dr Gopal, a Reader in Cambridge’s EnglishFaculty, and Fellow of Churchill College attacked his work, tweeting “we needto SHUT THIS DOWN”. The response, a widespread social media movement againstBiggar, came as a reaction to what the Oxford academic terms his “modest viewthat ‘empire’ can mean a variety of things, is capable of good as well as evil,raises ethical questions worth thinking about, and requires sophisticated moralevaluation.” “It is a political act to associate the University with an academic’s work through offers which legitimise figures such as Peterson. His work and views are not representative of the student body and as such we do not see his visit as a valuable contribution to the University, but one that works in opposition to the principles of the University.” “He, along with his colleagues, rushed to judgement”, saidBiggar, speaking about the judgement made by Stephen Toope, the Vice Chancellorof Cambridge University. The Director of the McDonald centre for Theology, Ethics andPublic Life, went on to say that “if you’re white, male, culturallyconservative, and given to expressing reasoned doubt of prevailing mores,you’ll be given no benefit of doubt at all.” He claims that “the full significance of Cambridge’sreaction in this case only becomes clear when related to an earlier one”, goingon to describe Cambridge Fellow Dr Priyamvada Gopal’s online attack on his work“Ethics and Empire” as “incontinent abuse”, based on the same rhetoric as thedecision to withdraw Peterson’s invitation. A Cambridge University spokesperson told the Evening Standard: “We recognise Nigel Biggar’s right to hold views on Cambridge in relation to discrimination against white, male, conservative men, which are claims which we refute utterly.” He goes on to claim that the “fact that Dr Gopal’s behaviourappears to have violated their university’s own Social Media Guidelines seemsto have bothered them not at all.” The Oxford Regius professor wrote that, having examinedPeterson’s actions and career, he believed critics of the Canadian “had no goodreason to infer from a single, ambiguous photograph that Jordan Petersonendorsed ‘Islamophobia’”, referring to an image taken of Peterson with his armaround a man saying “I am a proud Islamophobe”. “When one puts Cambridge University’s serial inaction in thecase of Dr Gopal alongside its precipitate action in the case of ProfessorPeterson, what is revealed is this: the University does in fact discriminate onthe unjustifiable grounds of race, gender, and above all morals and politics. “He failed to ask the obvious questions that any fair-mindedobserver would have asked. Biggar then extends his comparison, appearing to state thatDr Gopal received preferential and inconsistent treatment from the University,on the basis of her race, sex and political biases. Dr Gopal described the piece in the Oxford Magazine as a ‘tedious bore”, saying “These power imbalances are so profoundly built in to bullying, harassment, stalking, racism, sexism etc”. At the time, Cambridge’s Student Union (CUSU) offered thefollowing statement “We are relieved to hear that Jordan Peterson’s request fora visiting fellowship to Cambridge’s faculty of divinity has been rescindedfollowing further review. “To refute it would require counterargument andcounter-evidence. Since Cambridge has supplied neither, it has not refuted myclaim; it has merely rejected it without explanation. Once again its leadershiphas shown itself incapable of engaging in the accountable giving-and-taking ofreasons, which is the very raison d’etre of a university.” “However, if you’re white, male, culturally conservative,and given to expressing reasoned doubt about prevailing mores, you’ll be givenno benefit of doubt at all. And, should you do so much as appear to transgressill-conceived norms of inclusiveness, you’ll be summarily and rudely excluded.” “If you’re non-white, female, and aggressively ‘woke’, thenyou’ll be accorded maximal benefit of doubt, given a pass on official norms ofcivility, and let free to spit hatred and contempt on social media. In response to this, an extensive blog post from Peterson, entitled “Cambridge University Rescinds my Fellowship”, condemned the university and union, ending with the statement “I think that it is no bloody wonder that the faith is declining (and with it, the values of the West, as it fragments) with cowards and mountebanks of the sort who manifested themselves today at the helm. I wish them the continued decline in relevance over the next few decades that they deeply and profoundly and diligently work toward and deserve.”last_img read more

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Chip Miller Surf Fest Raises Money for Good Cause

first_imgBy Maddy VitaleThe 16th Annual Chip Miller Surf Fest brought more than 200 surfers out with their families Friday morning to the 7th Street surfing beach in Ocean City to help raise awareness and funds for Amyloidosis research.It was just one of three big events planned in memory of Miller, who raised his family in Ocean City.After the Surf Fest, the fundraiser was heading to OC Waterpark for a night of food, partying and a host of rides.On Sunday, there will be a Skate Fest fundraiser held by the Chip Miller Amyloidosis Foundation beginning at 11 a.m. at the Ocean City Skate Park.Lance Miller, of Ocean City, says the goal is to grow the foundation.Miller was diagnosed in 2004 with Amyloidosis, a rare disease which occurs when abnormal protein, called amyloid, builds up in one or more organs causing a malfunction. A few months later, he passed away.For Lance Miller, of Ocean City, Chip Miller’s son, every event that helps keep his father’s memory alive, and possibly helps someone else who suffers with the disease, is an important day.“I said to God, ‘My dad is looking down on us,”‘ Miller said as he watched surfers take to the water. “We lucked out today. Everyone came out. The weather is perfect.”Surfers said the waves Friday were some of the best they’ve seen in a long time.Surfers catch waves all day at 7th Street Beach in Ocean City.Renowned surfer and skateboarder, Zoe Herishen, 12, of Wildwood Crest and Wood-Ridge, N.J., came out for the cause.“It’s really cool and awesome,” Zoe said. “I surfed one heat so far.”Zoe’s parents, Tracey and Ken Herishen, also came along for the Surf Fest.“We absolutely love Lance. He is a great guy and so inspiring. He is doing great things for the kids. We look forward to this event every year,” Tracey Herishen said.Harley Carly, 14, (left) of Manasquan, gets a congratulatory hug from fellow surfer, Zoe Herishen, 12, of Wildwood Crest.Zoe’s friend, Harley Carly, 14, of Manasquan, said it is fun to see her surfing friends.“A lot of us surfers get to see each other and hang out and have a good time,” Harley said minutes after coming out of the water.Ocean City professional surfer, Rob Kelly, had a good time helping out with the heats.“It’s always an awesome event regardless of the waves, but the waves today have been the best waves we’ve had all summer,” Kelly said. “It’s really exciting.”Professional surfer, Rob Kelly, center, of Ocean City, gives a wave.Michael Garland, who handles public relations for the Chip Miller Amyloidosis Foundation, said of Surf Fest, “It is a great way for the foundation to kick off the fundraising season and awareness for Amyloidosis.”For Lance Miller, the goal is to not only raise money, but also to broaden the reach and educate people about Amyloidosis. The foundation continually adds events, contests and other features, he said, to continue to make it a memorable experience for participants and their families.He and his father used to surf together.Lance Miller with his daughter, Ella.Now, he is teaching his daughter, Ella, 10, to surf.On Friday, she decided to ride a wave without any help from her father.“I like it,” Ella said of surfing.“I told her if she goes out and catches a wave on her own, I’ll buy her a surfboard,” Miller said.For more information about the organization, visit www.ChipMiller.org or via the CMAF Facebook page, www.facebook.com/AmyloidosisAwarenes. Surfers enjoy a day of good waves for a good cause.Spectators watch the action.The OC Waterpark was part of the Chip Miller Amyloidosis Foundation weekend of events in Ocean City. Surfers wait for the call to head out and ride the waves during the Surf Fest.last_img read more

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George Clinton & Parliament Releases Wild Music Video For First New Song In 38 Years [Watch]

first_imgGeorge Clinton has revived his long-dormant funk outfit Parliament for the group’s first album in nearly four decades. Dubbed Medicaid Fraud Dog, the forthcoming record is a long-awaited follow up to the band’s 1980 LP, Trombipulation.The first taste of Medicaid Fraud Dog came recently with the release of the album’s debut single, “I’m Gon Make U Sick O’Me”. With its slow-burning funk groove, female background singers, hand-clapping beat, and a guest appearance by Geto Boys rapper Scarface, the song is a hodgepodge of sounds that harkens back to Parliament’s heyday while also embracing more modern musical styles. Today the song is matched with a new music video.The new video for “I’m Gon Make U Sick O’Me” features Scarface as Dr. Feel Good, who serves George Clinton prescription medicine to heal him from an illness in a psychedelic hospital setting. Watch “I’m Gon Make U Sick O’Me” below:George Clinton, who turns 77 in July, has more than 50 dates scheduled between now and Near Year’s, including shows in the U.S., Europe, and Japan. About a week and a half ago, the Parliament/Funkadelic frontman announced that he is going to retire from touring in May 2019. Head to his website for more information.last_img read more

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Meaningful meal

first_imgThere aren’t many people who can point to a single day when everything in their life changed, but Jesse Sanchez ’14 can.“The day was March 31 — three days after my 18th birthday,” he said. “I come home to an email from the Harvard College Admissions Office. ‘Dear Mr. Sanchez’ … I couldn’t believe it. At that moment, I realized I was accepted to Harvard University.”Being accepted, however, was only the first hurdle Sanchez faced in coming to Harvard.Even a single semester’s tuition was far beyond his family’s income. Without some sort of support, it was unlikely this Californian would ever set foot in Cambridge. For Sanchez and thousands of other Harvard students, that support arrived in the form of Harvard’s Financial Aid Initiative.“As I reflect on the last four years of my life, I ask myself how all of this was possible,” Sanchez said recently. “I realize that this opportunity to change my family’s reality came from people like you. And there are no words to express my gratitude. My life could have been very, very different, but you have helped make this an opportunity that I will always cherish — always.”Sanchez’s comments came during the Celebration of Scholarships dinner, an annual event that brings together students who benefit from financial aid with donors who support the program. With more than 300 students and donors on hand, Sanchez shared his story and described his plans to work in Mexico next year as a Fulbright Scholar.Held earlier this month in Annenberg Hall, the dinner was co-hosted by longtime financial aid supporters Jerry Jordan ’61, M.B.A. ’67, and his wife, Darlene, and featured comments from Harvard President Drew Faust and Dean of Admissions and Financial Aid William R. Fitzsimmons, both of whom extolled the Financial Aid Initiative as being among Harvard’s most important programs.“Ensuring the success and strength of financial aid is one of my highest priorities as president,” Faust told donors and students. “What Harvard is depends on who it is. Attracting the most talented students is essential to all we’ve ever been and hope to be, and I’m convinced that enabling such talented students to have the benefit of a Harvard education is also essential to all we want the world to be.”For donors like Brian Keane ’83, M.B.A. ’87, the dinner marks an invaluable chance to see, in an up-close-and-personal way, how their donation affects the lives of students in meaningful ways.“We believe that the greatest investment we can make in anyone is an education,” Keane said. “It cannot be overstated how important education is. It is one of the most powerful instruments of economic growth and well-being. To help make Harvard more reachable for more people by giving to financial aid is very meaningful to me and my family.”Established in 2000, the Keane Family Scholarship Fund provides support to 10 Harvard College students, and is specifically directed at students from the New England region. Over the years, Keane said, the program has provided opportunities for a diverse group of students, from those who grew up on farms to those who lived in inner cities, with interests as diverse as music and technology.“They are unbelievably diverse,” Keane said of the students who benefit from financial aid. “They are all incredibly capable in their own way. What makes the Harvard experience so amazing has, in large part, to do with the community of students they join on campus. The academics, obviously, are exceptional, but I don’t think anywhere else are you going to get the diverse, incredible student body you find here. That’s part of why we support Harvard — so Harvard can continue to be that place.”Harvard’s Faculty of Arts and Sciences (FAS) launched its portion of the University capital campaign in October. At $600 million, financial aid is the largest of the six goals for the Faculty of Arts and Sciences’ $2.5 billion drive.“Because of our unwavering commitment to keeping a Harvard College education affordable for all students, regardless of family income, the real cost for most families will remain far less than the so-called ‘sticker price,’ ” said FAS Dean Michael D. Smith. “We owe a debt of gratitude to our extremely generous alumni, whose support makes our financial aid program possible.While the program offers clear benefits to the students on campus by finding exceptional students and giving them the opportunity to go on to become exceptional citizens, its effects reach far beyond the gates of Harvard Yard.Nicolas Jofre ’13 (Ricardo Salas Scholarship Fund) is among those who benefited from financial aid; he now runs The Student Union, a Boston-based initiative that encourages high school students and recent graduates to become involved in education policy.“Had it not been for the financial aid I received, I would not have been able to attend Harvard,” Jofre said.Looking back on it now, Jofre said if he’d had to forgo a Harvard education, it’s unlikely his life would have continued on the same trajectory he’d set during his high school career.“I was very engaged in education advocacy in California, and had the privilege of serving on the state Board of Education at 17 years old,” he said. “I don’t know that the many wonderful things I did at Harvard, and that I’m doing now, would have happened had I gone to community college. In many ways, financial aid … really gave me the opportunity to live up to my fullest potential. It has definitely made the difference of a lifetime.”Although she was accepted at other colleges, Gabriela Ruiz-Colon ’16 (Helen L. and Benjamin J. Buttenwieser Scholarship Fund) said the excitement that came with the acceptance was often tempered with concerns about the cost of tuition.“I was able to embrace Harvard immediately, knowing that the Financial Aid Office was going to have my back, and they have been incredible,” she said.  “Harvard gives you everything you need to become the person you want to be.”last_img read more

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Mississippi police: Officers killed armed burglary suspect

first_imgMERIDIAN, Miss. (AP) — Authorities say Mississippi police fatally shot a burglary suspect who was armed with a knife. Meridian Mayor Percy Bland said Tuesday that police responded to a neighborhood after a homeowner called 911 to report a burglary in process. He said responding officers chased a suspect and an officer fired his gun in self-defense. Police Chief Chris Read said the suspect attacked one of the officers with the knife. The officer sustained cuts to the back of his neck and was treated for a cut. Read said three officers have been placed on paid leave. The suspect and officers haven’t been identified.last_img read more

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Student Affairs names 8 ND student award recipients

first_imgAlthough the Division of Student Affairs was unable to host its annual Student Leadership Awards Banquet due to the outbreak of COVID-19, eight students are being recognized for their commitment to Notre Dame and the contributions they have made in their time as an undergraduate.Eric Kim, a marketing and film, television and theatre double major, received the Rev. A. Leonard Collins, C.S.C. Award, which honors a graduating senior who has displayed a substantial personal effort to advance the interests of students at Notre Dame. Kim was involved with the Student Union Board throughout his time at Notre Dame and served as its executive director his senior year where he focused on creating a welcoming space.“My main goal, even beyond [being] an executive director but throughout my four years, was to help create a diverse and inclusive environment at our events,” Kim said.Christian Abraham Arega, a biochemistry major with an anthropology minor, received the Rev. Theodore M. Hesburgh, C.S.C Award, meant to honor a graduating senior whose contributions have advanced the climate of welcome and inclusion within or beyond the University community. A resident assistant in Howard Hall, Arega has also been involved in the International Scholars Program, Building Bridges Mentorship Program and Fighting Irish Scholars Program. She said she was shocked to receive this award.“It really caught me off guard the most because I felt like this was a very challenging year for me and that I didn’t really do as much as I would have liked,” Arega said. “It was a really cool way to realize that even when we’re going through the hardest of times, it’s possible to still be good and still do good, and people see through the hard times, and they see you for who you are.”Julaine Zenk, a fifth-year psychology student studying brain cognition and behavior, received the Sister Jean Lenz, O.S.F. Leadership Award, honoring a post-baccalaureate student who has displayed leadership in promoting a more diverse, inclusive campus community. Zenk has had a large role in organizing graduate orientation each year to help introduce new graduate students to the Notre Dame community.“As a grad student, you sometimes just don’t feel like you’re part of the University community because you’re not living on campus, and it very much feels more like a job than like this is your school, your community. So I strove to help people find their place in the Notre Dame community,” Zenk said.Carolina Robledo, a music vocal performance major with minors in history and education, schooling and society, received The Blessed Basil Moreau, C.S.C., Leadership Award, which honors a graduating senior who embodies Father Moreau’s vision of educating both the heart and mind and who has demonstrated significant effort to advance the Catholic character of the University. Robledo was heavily involved in campus ministry in her time at Notre Dame and said she was ecstatic when she heard she had received this award.“Having been given this award reminds me of the mission of evangelization that we have, and sometimes we’re evangelizing without even knowing it,” Robledo said. “I knew that I was living out my Catholic faith and trying to do it for myself in my own personal life, but sometimes we forget that we can also have an impact on others.”Tim Jacklich, a political science major, received The John W. Gardner Student Leadership Award, given to a senior who exemplifies the ideals of the University through outstanding volunteer service beyond the University community. Jacklich served in many different volunteer positions in his time at Notre Dame, including the Robinson Community Learning Center, serving as an assistant teacher at Holy Cross School and spending the summer after his junior year in Puerto Rico as part of the Cross-Cultural Leadership Program.“I was involved in a really exciting project in San Juan that was in service of a very poor neighborhood in San Juan, and we were designing an entrepreneurship curriculum to be used in a local high school,” he said. “I worked with some great colleagues, fellow students from Notre Dame, and was able to apply my Spanish and my knowledge of education and ultimately achieve some really cool results.”Senior Laksumi Sivanandan, political science and American Studies double-major, received the Mike Russo Spirit Award, which honors an undergraduate student who exemplifies service and personal character and strives to bring out the best in themselves and others. Sivanandan was a leader in Class Council and was elected vice president of her class her sophomore year. She said she was not expecting to receive the award.“I have the privilege of working with so many caring, compassionate people who love Notre Dame so much, and I would never have thought that I would be on the same level as them. When I heard the news I was honestly pretty shocked but also it’s nice to feel that all of your work is respected and valued,” Sivanandan said.Madeline Coady, an accounting major with a Catholic social tradition minor, received the Ray Siegfried Award for Leadership Excellence, awarded to a graduating senior who exemplifies leadership, generosity and devotion to the Catholic faith and an affinity for athletics. Coady was a member of the Notre Dame women’s rowing team and was heavily involved with the Center for Social Concerns.“I never realized how important [a Catholic college] was to me until I pegged that Notre Dame had such a big Catholic tradition,” she said. “I’m super thankful for my time at Notre Dame; it has truly changed my life. I’d do it all over again in a heartbeat.”David Korzeniowski, a film, television and theatre major with minors in journalism, ethics and democracy (JED) and history, received the Denny Moore Award for Excellence in Journalism, given to a graduating senior who exemplifies personal integrity and character, commitment to Notre Dame and writing ability. He was a student broadcaster at Fighting Irish Media and worked for Scholastic Magazine, serving as managing editor his junior and senior year. He said he felt grateful to represent Notre Dame through journalism.“I think that journalism is a really important part of our school and our country in terms of getting accurate and helpful information out to people who might otherwise not be informed,” Korzeniowski said. “I think it’s a responsibility that journalists have to take their job seriously, and I’m glad to have been able to represent Notre Dame and the JED program in that realm.”Tags: Class of 2020, commencement 2020, division of student affairs, student awardslast_img read more

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Students react to first football game of season amidst pandemic

first_imgNotre Dame football returned Saturday with a win over Duke in Notre Dame Stadium on a game day like no other. With the campus largely closed off to spectators and fans, many traditions were banned or modified for the highly anticipated weekend. Students shared their experiences of the historic season opener with The Observer. Isabella Volmert | The Observer Only students, faculty and football players’ families are allowed as spectators in Notre Dame Stadium this year. Students are seated by household and are spread out throughout the stadium.First-years Mary Hanstad and Adison Steinke enjoyed their first Notre Dame football game, despite the lack of tailgating and other events on campus. “We heard about a lot of traditions,” Mary Hanstad said. She said she was still glad to experience some of them including the in-game cheers and touchdown push-ups. On and off rain cast a shadow over the games, however, the weather and the radically different atmosphere did not stop the Irish from beating Duke 27-13. Senior Olivia Venvertloh said she was grateful for the game day, which provided “a sense of normalcy.”The former Farley resident now resides off campus, and she attended the game with her two roommates, who celebrated with brunch beforehand.Despite the differences, Venvertloh said she and her friends were going to go and make the most their last first football game no matter what.“I wasn’t even sure it was going to happen,” she said. “Now we have the opportunity to be in the stadium and have the game day experience.”Venvertloh looks forward to the rest of the season.“I’m definitely excited for another win,” she said. The parking lots were void of tailgaters, but students still celebrated before the game by playing various lawn games such as spike ball and corn hole on the quad and taking pictures in front of the dome. A sign on south quad informed campus visitors the quad was reserved for student activity only. At the game, students grouped by household were scattered throughout the stadium. The cheerleaders led the crowd, this year in a line from the stands, below the first row of seats on the west side instead of on the field. Armed with pom-poms and signs, the cheerleaders and leprechaun Conal Fagan, who is a senior, could not sport any tumbling acts, but could still lead the traditional “Go, Irish!” stadium chant. Leprechaun Lynnette Wukie, who is a senior, served as new game day host, which was a new position this year meant to lead the students in games and announcements during the time outs. The band, spaced out, stood in the normal student section and played the traditional pregame music and a number of songs during halftime, although they could not march. Family members of the players and the opposing team sat in the visitor’s sections of the stadium. First-year Maria Frech and band member said the game lived up the the hype. The trumpet player especially liked the cheers and the band traditions. “It has always been my dream to be in the band and play at the games,“ she said. Frech said she’s looking forward to the next game despite the restrictions. Students jigged “Rakes of Mallow“ and enjoyed the fourth quarter Sgt. Tim McCarthy’s safety reminder. After each touchdown, students did push-ups with the help of their household in the tradition style or did real push-ups on the stands.Sophomore Josh O’Brien noted how Notre Dame is one of few universities allowing an autumn football and student spectators. “I like that we even get to be there,” he said. He did miss the noise of the regular 80,000 fans, he said. “It’s different in the crowd,” he said. First-year Luke Fortener also noted how the reduced crowd resulted in a quieter stadium. A South Bend native, Fortener has been to numerous games over the years. He said he was most excited for, “the community among the students.”James Chrisman, sophomore, said a tradition he missed was tailgating and sitting in the student section like normal. “It’s strange to be spread out,” he said. Chrisman said he was able to enjoy the game with the people around him, but wished students could have made their own group of friends to sit with, instead sitting with their households.  First-year Emma Eckstein sat with another resident of her dorm, since neither of their roommates bought tickets. While she still enjoyed the game, “the atmosphere was kind of off,” Eckstein said. Eckstein said she might have set her expectations too high for the first game. “I’m looking forward to it [the next home game] now I know what to expect,” she said. In order to attend, students were required to wear a mask at all times and remain in their assigned seats. Sophomore Summer Kerksick expressed concern about the actual health practices of the student spectators. “People weren’t really following the mask wearing and social distancing guidelines,” she said. Kerksick said at the beginning of the game, students wore their masks and sat in their assigned seats. However, as the game progressed, students began moving down and sitting in larger groups with others. “That became really frustrating,” Kerksick said. Kersick said students around her began pulling off their masks and some even began juuling. She saw students ask fellow students to put them back on, but she wished the ushers would have enforced the protocols more. Kerksick said she hoped the University will do more to enforce the protocols at future games. Notre Dame faces the South Florida Bulls this Saturday, Sept. 13 at 2:30 p.m.Tags: 2020 football season, COVID-19, Duke, Game Day, ND Football, Notre Dame football, Season Openerlast_img read more